161

Possible Duplicate:
Converting array to list in Java

I want to convert String array to ArrayList. For example String array is like:

String[] words = new String[]{"ace","boom","crew","dog","eon"};

How to convert this String array to ArrayList?

274

Use this code for that,

import java.util.Arrays;  
import java.util.List;  
import java.util.ArrayList;  

public class StringArrayTest {

   public static void main(String[] args) {  
      String[] words = {"ace", "boom", "crew", "dog", "eon"};  

      List<String> wordList = Arrays.asList(words);  

      for (String e : wordList) {  
         System.out.println(e);  
      }  
   }  
}
  • 13
    In summary all you need is the line List<String> wordList = Arrays.asList(words); . Is this correct? – Keale Aug 5 '14 at 2:40
  • @Keale If words is an array of strings, then, yes. – Nicolai S Oct 22 '15 at 22:06
  • 18
    Beware: Arrays.asList(...) creates an AbstractList, not a real list. So you can do stuff like wordList.sort((a, b) -> a.length() - b.length()), but you can not do wordList.remove(0), or add to it. This will throw UnsupportedOperationException. – Nicolai S Oct 22 '15 at 22:08
  • 8
    This code creates a List but it is not an ArrayList. So it is an incorrect answer. You cant delete elements from that List -> will throw an exception. – Witold Kaczurba Mar 16 '17 at 15:04
  • @Vito I have to agree that this is probably not a solution to a real problem unless someone can tell my why you would want to convert String[] to List and then not update the list. – Jeff Holt Jul 7 '17 at 19:26
164
new ArrayList( Arrays.asList( new String[]{"abc", "def"} ) );
  • 4
    i think that this solution is better because Arrays.asList return a java.util.Arrays.ArrayList.ArrayList<T>(T[]) so if you try to add something you'll get a java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException – Manuel Spigolon Feb 19 '15 at 15:39
  • 1
    If you have limited number of elemenets in the array, it can be written as new ArrayList( Arrays.asList("abc", "def")); – Diptopol Dam Mar 30 '15 at 3:46
  • 1
    To avoid IDE warnings, new ArrayList<>(...) worked for me as opposed to new ArrayList(...) (note the <>). – Farbod Salamat-Zadeh Aug 26 '15 at 14:31
  • 2
    Best answer for me. With List<String> wordList = Arrays.asList(words);, doing wordList instanceof ArrayList<String> will return false. – alvgarvilla May 24 '16 at 15:39
41

Using Collections#addAll()

String[] words = {"ace","boom","crew","dog","eon"};
List<String> arrayList = new ArrayList<>(); 
Collections.addAll(arrayList, words); 
  • 5
    I like this solution. It is concise and clean. – Dinesh Arora Aug 11 '16 at 14:19
  • Quite why this is not the accepted answer is unknown to me. – Bathsheba Sep 12 '18 at 13:50
  • This is the right answer. asList is wrong. use Collection.addAll(arrayList, string array)... – Silambarasan Sep 21 '19 at 10:24
25
String[] words= new String[]{"ace","boom","crew","dog","eon"};
List<String> wordList = Arrays.asList(words);
  • 7
    The result here is a List, but not an ArrayList. – Marko Topolnik May 10 '12 at 8:45
  • 4
    @MarkoTopolnik you are right, this needs to be wrapped so List<String> wordList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(words)); – Scorpion May 10 '12 at 9:24
11

in most cases the List<String> should be enough. No need to create an ArrayList

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

...

String[] words={"ace","boom","crew","dog","eon"};
List<String> l = Arrays.<String>asList(words);

// if List<String> isnt specific enough:
ArrayList<String> al = new ArrayList<String>(l);

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