118

Is there a pythonic way to unpack a list in the first element and the "tail" in a single command?

For example:

>> head, tail = **some_magic applied to** [1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55]
>> head
1
>>> tail
[1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55]
1
  • 10
    Remember that lists are not implemented as singly-linked lists in Python, so this operation is costly (as in: the whole list needs to be copied). Depending on what you want to achieve, this might or might not be a problem. I am just mentioning that because this type of list destructuring is often found in functional languages, where it is actually a very cheap operation.
    – Niklas B.
    Commented May 13, 2012 at 23:49

5 Answers 5

246

Under Python 3.x, you can do this nicely:

>>> head, *tail = [1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55]
>>> head
1
>>> tail
[1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55]

A new feature in 3.x is to use the * operator in unpacking, to mean any extra values. It is described in PEP 3132 - Extended Iterable Unpacking. This also has the advantage of working on any iterable, not just sequences.

It's also really readable.

As described in the PEP, if you want to do the equivalent under 2.x (without potentially making a temporary list), you have to do this:

it = iter(iterable)
head, tail = next(it), list(it)

As noted in the comments, this also provides an opportunity to get a default value for head rather than throwing an exception. If you want this behaviour, next() takes an optional second argument with a default value, so next(it, None) would give you None if there was no head element.

Naturally, if you are working on a list, the easiest way without the 3.x syntax is:

head, tail = seq[0], seq[1:]
11
  • 1
    sorry, I used the term tail unproperly. I mean what I say in the example, that is the list without the first element Commented May 10, 2012 at 10:55
  • 1
    @NikolayFominyh They are both the same - they both take the head element and construct a new list containing the tail elements. No difference in complexity. Another class could implement __getitem__/__setitem__ to do the tail operation lazily, but the built-in list does not. Commented Jul 4, 2017 at 1:25
  • 3
    On a list of 800 elements doing it 1M times, I have 2.8s for the head, *tail = seq solution and only 1.8s for head, tail = seq[0], seq[1:] solution. Slicing is still faster for lists.
    – Cabu
    Commented Oct 18, 2017 at 13:45
  • 2
    @CMCDragonkai No, Python's main list class is an array list. This would be O(n) as it involves copying the tail to a new list (with one O(1) get for the head). Commented Mar 22, 2018 at 8:05
  • 1
    This nice syntax is another reason to move to python 3.x
    – daparic
    Commented Dec 14, 2018 at 14:47
40
>>> mylist = [1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55]
>>> head, tail = mylist[0], mylist[1:]
>>> head
1
>>> tail
[1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55]
13

For O(1) complexity of head,tail operation you should use deque however.

Following way:

from collections import deque
l = deque([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9])
head, tail = l.popleft(), l

It's useful when you must iterate through all elements of the list. For example in naive merging 2 partitions in merge sort.

3
  • 1
    It seems like deque(list_instance) has O(N) complexity. Am i wrong? Commented Jun 8, 2017 at 16:30
  • 1
    @НикитаКонин, you are right about construction of deque. However, if you want to access first element more than once, then head, tail = l.popleft(), l is ~O(1). head, tail = seq[0], seq[1:] is O(n). Commented Jun 14, 2017 at 16:23
  • It looks like you can just do head = l.popleft() and tail is just an alias for l. If l changes tail changes too.
    – kon psych
    Commented Feb 24, 2020 at 19:47
3

Python 2, using lambda

>>> head, tail = (lambda lst: (lst[0], lst[1:]))([1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55])
>>> head
1
>>> tail
[1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55]
3
  • 2
    why in the world would you do this instead of just head, tail = lst[0], lst[1:]? if OP means to use a literal then he could split head and tail manually head, tail = 1, [1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55] Commented Mar 29, 2018 at 16:26
  • 3
    (1) Op's question was whether it's possible to do this in one line (so no lst = ... in previous line). (2) Doing head, tail = lst[0], lst[1:] leaves the code open to side-effects (consider head, tail = get_list()[0], get_list()[1:]), and is different than Op's form head, tail = **some_magic applied to** [1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55]. Commented Mar 30, 2018 at 1:02
  • That being said, I acknowledge that this is a bad obfuscated way to get the head/tail. But I thought it was the best answer for Python 2 for Op's specific question. Commented Mar 30, 2018 at 1:03
2

Building on the Python 2 solution from @GarethLatty, the following is a way to get a single line equivalent without intermediate variables in Python 2.

t=iter([1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55]);h,t = [(h,list(t)) for h in t][0]

If you need it to be exception-proof (i.e. supporting empty list), then add:

t=iter([]);h,t = ([(h,list(t)) for h in t]+[(None,[])])[0]

If you want to do it without the semicolon, use:

h,t = ([(h,list(t)) for t in [iter([1,2,3,4])] for h in t]+[(None,[])])[0]
0

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