I have checked my PHP ini file and display errors is set and also error reporting is E_ALL. I have restarted my Apache web server.

I have even put these lines at the top of my script, and it doesn't even catch simple parse errors. For example, I declare variables with a "$" and I don't close statements";". But all my scripts show a blank page on these errors, but I want to actually see the errors in my browser output.

error_reporting(E_ALL);
ini_set('display_errors', 1);

What is left to do?

  • 6
    I've yet to nail down exactly why this works sometimes and not others, but for anyone wanting to quickly toggle errors in a php script (or enable them via a $_REQUEST parameter) these two lines will work most of the time. – brandonscript Oct 28 '13 at 20:15
  • well you can see details of the error by enabling xdebug from php ini file. – jewelhuq Jan 13 '16 at 10:14
  • Find all details here php-show-all-errors.com – Abu Yousef May 4 '17 at 15:32

24 Answers 24

up vote 2647 down vote accepted

This always works for me:

ini_set('display_errors', 1);
ini_set('display_startup_errors', 1);
error_reporting(E_ALL);

However, this doesn't make PHP to show parse errors - the only way to show those errors is to modify your php.ini with this line:

display_errors = on
  • 2
    Also note that you can use these 3 lines, and then include('fileImWorkingOn.php');. Then you can catch the syntax errors too! – Snap May 8 '15 at 18:11
  • 4
    This won't show parse errors – Bsienn Jun 1 '15 at 10:35
  • 9
    While I'm no SysOps, I think more people have an .htaccess file than php.ini, and these would both come before parsing, right? php_flag display_errors 1 for .htaccess – Ryan Taylor Jul 9 '15 at 21:58
  • 1
    So now that the errors get logged, where do they go? I went to /var/log/apache2 and it shows all the logs, but there is no information regarding the program I recently ran. I only get information about system restarts once every morning. – Michael May 17 '16 at 15:14
  • 1
    @Michael The errors go right to the screen or to where the output is redirected to – Fancy John May 18 '16 at 5:35

You can't catch parse errors when enabling error output at runtime, because it parses the file before actually executing anything (and since it encounters an error during this, it won't execute anything). You'll need to change the actual server configuration so that display_errors is on and the approriate error_reporting level is used. If you don't have access to php.ini, you may be able to use .htaccess or similar, depending on the server.

This question may provide additional info.

  • 1
    Did not know that. I edited the php.ini file manually and it is working now. Thanks! – Abs Jun 27 '09 at 19:16

Inside your php.ini:

display_errors = on

Then restart your web server.

  • 8
    +1. On my mac : /etc/php.ini – Shanimal Apr 1 '13 at 3:48
  • 7
    +①. On my ubuntu /etc/php5/apache2/php.ini – m93a Feb 23 '15 at 17:44
  • 4
    for restart (Debian, Ubuntu, etc.) sudo service apache2 restart – Peter Krauss Sep 1 '15 at 13:04
  • 3
    For restart on OS X sudo apachectl -k restart. – Pea Jan 10 '16 at 19:53
  • 1
    fun fact: you can locate your php.ini file loaded if you simply put in phpinfo(); into a blank php file. it's the 7th row down and called Loaded Configuration File – Frankenmint Jul 24 '16 at 4:56

To display all errors you need to:

1. Have these lines in the PHP script you're calling from the browser (typically index.php):

error_reporting(E_ALL);
ini_set('display_errors', '1');

2.(a) Make sure that this script has no syntax errors

—or—

2.(b) Set display_errors = On in your php.ini

Otherwise, it can't even run those 2 lines!

You can check for syntax errors in your script by running (at the command line):

php -l index.php

If you include the script from another PHP script then it will display syntax errors in the included script. For example:

index.php

error_reporting(E_ALL);
ini_set('display_errors', '1');

// Any syntax errors here will result in a blank screen in the browser

include 'my_script.php';

my_script.php

adjfkj // This syntax error will be displayed in the browser

Some web hosting providers allow you to change PHP params in the .htaccess file.

You can add the following line:

php_value display_errors 1

I had the same issue as yours and this solution fixed it.

  • 2
    Not php_flag? ie.: php_flag display_errors on – PeterM Oct 27 '15 at 18:45
  • 2
    I tried this and got 500 Internal Server Error. – posfan12 Dec 23 '16 at 14:34
  • And if you are in nginx environment then add the php value to your site (sites-available) configuration under the location ~\.php directive. fastcgi_param PHP_VALUE " error_reporting=E_ALL;\n display_errors=1;"; – Lazaros Kosmidis Oct 9 at 7:25

You might find all of the settings for "error reporting" or "display errors" do not appear to work in PHP 7. That is because error handling has changed. Try this instead:

try{
     // Your code
} 
catch(Error $e) {
    $trace = $e->getTrace();
    echo $e->getMessage().' in '.$e->getFile().' on line '.$e->getLine().' called from '.$trace[0]['file'].' on line '.$trace[0]['line'];
}

Or, to catch exceptions and errors in one go (this is not backward compatible with PHP 5):

try{
     // Your code
} 
catch(Throwable $e) {
    $trace = $e->getTrace();
    echo $e->getMessage().' in '.$e->getFile().' on line '.$e->getLine().' called from '.$trace[0]['file'].' on line '.$trace[0]['line'];
}
  • It would be nice to show the traceback as well – Fancy John Oct 17 '16 at 5:55
  • Do you mean PHP7 or PHP7.1 ? I am confused, I tried as the validated answer proposed and it works, I think you are proposing something a bit different IMHO, indeed "no backward compatibility" and if you have to modify a full PHP < 7 code and need to add try{} catch() {} code everywhere in your already defined php code, I don't even want to think the mess that's going to be.. – vdegenne Jan 22 '17 at 11:22
  • @FancyJohn, this could help: $bt = debug_backtrace(); print_r($bt);. – Frank Forte Mar 23 '17 at 3:25
  • @ballangddang, I ran into the issue with PHP 7.0, where the only way I could get the error to display was using the try/catch blocks and specifically catching Error. If you rewrite all requests (except maybe JavaScript, CSS, Images, etc) to the index.php file, then have the try catch block there, it makes it easier. Yes, any system that does not have a single entry point would be a major headache to update. – Frank Forte Mar 23 '17 at 3:28
  • Does PHP not show unhandled exceptions? Pretty sure it does? – Martin Tournoij Jun 5 '17 at 2:20

This will work:

<?php
     error_reporting(E_ALL);
     ini_set('display_errors', 1);    
?>

Use:

ini_set('display_errors', 1);
ini_set('display_startup_errors', 1);
error_reporting(E_ALL);

This is the best way to write it, but a syntax error gives blank output, so use the console to check for syntax errors. The best way to debug PHP code is to use the console; run the following:

php -l phpfilename.php

Set this in your index.php

ini_set('display_errors', 1);
ini_set('display_startup_errors', 1);
error_reporting(E_ALL);
  • 1
    Yes, it's works fine...Thanks @Sumit. – Vikas Dobariya Sep 29 '17 at 11:22

Create a file called php.ini in the folder where your PHP file resides.

Inside php.ini add the following code (I am giving an simple error showing code):

display_errors = on

display_startup_errors = on

Here is a PHP script:

<?php
    ini_set("display_startup_errors", 1);
    ini_set("display_errors", 1);

    /* Reports for either E_ERROR | E_WARNING | E_NOTICE  | Any Error*/
    error_reporting(E_ALL);

    echo(abc); /* Notice: abc is an undefined constant */
?>

For a more detailed explanation of PHP errors, visit PHP Error - error_reporting().

  • 1
    How is this any different from Fancy John's answer? – cpburnz May 14 '16 at 16:22

When using PHP as an Apache module, we can a change the configuration settings using directives in Apache configuration files (e.g. httpd.conf) and .htaccess files. You will need “AllowOverride Options” or “AllowOverride All” privileges to do so.

Check this

http://funbird.co.uk/blog/tech-articals/linux-tech-articals/enabling-error-display-php-via-htaccess

If you somehow find yourself in a situation where you can't modifiy the setting via php.ini or .htaccess you're out of luck for displaying errors when your PHP scripts contain parse errors. You'd then have to resolve to linting the files on the command line like this:

find . -name '*.php' -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -n1 -P8 php -l | grep -v "No syntax errors"

If your host is so locked down that it does not allow changing the value via php.ini or .htaccess, it may also disallow changing the value via ini_set. You can check that with the following PHP script:

<?php
if( !ini_set( 'display_errors', 1 ) ) {
  echo "display_errors cannot be set.";
} else {
  echo "changing display_errors via script is possible.";
}
  • find . -name '*.php' -type f -exec php -l {} \; | grep -v 'No syntax errors detected' is simpler – scones Nov 24 '17 at 13:27

If, despite following all of the above answers (or you can't edit your php.ini file), you still can't get an error message, try making a new PHP file that enables error reporting and then include the problem file. eg:

error_reporting(E_ALL);
ini_set('display_errors', 1);
require_once('problem_file.php');

Despite having everything set properly in my php.ini file, this was the only way I could catch a namespace error. My exact scenario was:

//file1.php
namespace a\b;
class x {
    ...
}

//file2.php
namespace c\d;
use c\d\x; //Dies because it's not sure which 'x' class to use
class x {
    ...
}
  • 1
    No, the error reporting is not a loglevel, it is a bitfield. Using 999999 is a very bad idea, use some power-of-two minus 1, for example 2047! – peterh Jul 17 at 13:32
  • You're absolutely right, @peterh! I've changed it to E_ALL as this will enable reporting of all errors (except strict errors in php 5.4 and below). – jxmallett Jul 18 at 2:52

As we are now running PHP7, answers given here are not correct anymore. The only one still OK is the one from Frank Forte, as he talks about PHP7. On the other side, rather than trying to catch error with a try/catch you can use a trick: use include. Here 3 pieces of code:

File: tst1.php

<?php
error_reporting(E_ALL);
ini_set('display_errors','On');
// Missing " and ;
echo "Testing
?>  

Running this in PHP7 will show nothing

Now, try this:

File: tst2.php

<?php
error_reporting(E_ALL);
ini_set('display_errors','On');
include ("tst3.php");
?> 

File: tst3.php

<?php
// Missing " and ;
echo "Testing
?>  

Now run tst2 which set the error reporting then include tst3. You will see:

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected end of file, expecting variable (T_VARIABLE) or ${ (T_DOLLAR_OPEN_CURLY_BRACES) or {$ (T_CURLY_OPEN) in tst3.php on line 4

You can do something like below :

Set below parameters in your main index file

    ini_set('display_errors', 1);
    ini_set('display_startup_errors', 1);

Then based on your requirement you can choose which you want to show :

For All Error, Warning and Notice

    error_reporting(E_ALL); OR error_reporting(-1);

For All Errors

    error_reporting(E_ERROR);

For All Warnings

    error_reporting(E_WARNING);

For All Notice

    error_reporting(E_NOTICE);

For More Info check here

I would usually go with the following code in my plain php project which are very small, if the project grows large then I will recommend.

if(!defined('ENVIRONMENT')){
    define('ENVIRONMENT','DEVELOPMENT');
}

$base_url   =   null;

if (defined('ENVIRONMENT'))
{
    switch (ENVIRONMENT)
    {
        case 'DEVELOPMENT':
            $base_url   =   'http://localhost/product/';
            ini_set('display_errors',1);
            ini_set('display_startup_errors',1);
            error_reporting(E_ALL|E_STRICT);
            break;

        case 'PRODUCTION':
            $base_url   =   'Prod url'; /* https://google.com */
            error_reporting(0);
            /* Mechanism to log errors */
            break;

        default:
            exit('The application environment is not set correctly.');
    }
}

Hope this helps.

You can add your own custom error handler, which can provide extra debug info. Furthermore you can set it up to send you via email.

function ERR_HANDLER($errno ,$errstr, $errfile, $errline){
    $msg="<b>Someting bad happened.</b> [$errno] $errstr <br><br>
    <b>File:</b> $errfile <br>
    <b>Line:</b> $errline <br>
    <pre>".json_encode(debug_backtrace(), JSON_PRETTY_PRINT)."</pre> <br>";

    echo $msg;

    return false;
}

function EXC_HANDLER($exception){
    ERR_HANDLER(0,$exception->getMessage(),$exception->getFile(),$exception->getLine());
}

function shutDownFunction() {
    $error = error_get_last();
    if ($error["type"] == 1) {
        ERR_HANDLER($error["type"],$error["message"],$error["file"],$error["line"]);
    }
}

set_error_handler ("ERR_HANDLER", E_ALL & ~E_NOTICE & ~E_STRICT & ~E_DEPRECATED);
register_shutdown_function("shutdownFunction");
set_exception_handler("EXC_HANDLER");

The best/easy/fast solution that you can use if it's a quick debugging, is to surround your code with catching exceptions. That's what I'm doing when I want to check something fast on production.

try {

//Page code

} catch (Exception $e) {
    echo 'Caught exception: ',  $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}

I Hope this helps.

  • For php7, catch (Throwable $e) is better... Or another catch block underneath catch(Error $e) – Frank Forte Aug 19 '17 at 2:58

This code on top should work error_reporting(E_ALL);

However try to edit the code on phone in file

error_reporting =on

Just write:

error_reporting(-1);

That's what I learnt. In PHP.INI file

error_reporting = E_ALL
display_errors = On
<?php
// Turn off error reporting
error_reporting(0);

// Report runtime errors
error_reporting(E_ERROR | E_WARNING | E_PARSE);

// Report all errors
error_reporting(E_ALL);

// Same as error_reporting(E_ALL);
ini_set("error_reporting", E_ALL);

// Report all errors except E_NOTICE
error_reporting(E_ALL & ~E_NOTICE);
?

>

While your site is live, the php.ini file should have display_errors disabled for security reasons. However, for the development environment, display_errors can be enabled for troubleshooting.

  • How is this answer better than the accepted answer? – hello May 24 at 13:02
  • @hello, It has comments and is formatted in a clear way. – Michael Beck Jun 5 at 21:14

if you have xdebug installed you can override every setting by setting:

xdebug.force_display_errors = 1;
xdebug.force_error_reporting = -1;

force_display_errors

Type: int, Default value: 0, Introduced in Xdebug >= 2.3 If this setting is set to 1 then errors will always be displayed, no matter what the setting of PHP's display_errors is.

force_error_reporting

Type: int, Default value: 0, Introduced in Xdebug >= 2.3 This setting is a bitmask, like error_reporting. This bitmask will be logically ORed with the bitmask represented by error_reporting to dermine which errors should be displayed. This setting can only be made in php.ini and allows you to force certain errors from being shown no matter what an application does with ini_set().

protected by starkeen Jun 8 '16 at 18:22

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.