In Java, I have text from a text field in a String variable called "text".

How can I save the contents of the "text" variable to a file?

20 Answers 20

If you're simply outputting text, rather than any binary data, the following will work:

PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter("filename.txt");

Then, write your String to it, just like you would to any output stream:

out.println(text);

You'll need exception handling, as ever. Be sure to call out.close() when you've finished writing.

If you are using Java 7 or later, you can use the "try-with-resources statement" which will automatically close your PrintStream when you are done with it (ie exit the block) like so:

try (PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter("filename.txt")) {
    out.println(text);
}

You will still need to explicitly throw the java.io.FileNotFoundException as before.

  • 4
    @Justin, you could also pass an absolute path (e.g. "/tmp/filename.txt") to the FileOutputStream constructor, to save the file anywhere you want – Jonik Jun 28 '09 at 8:54
  • 7
    Btw, this could be simplified using the convenience constructors PrintStream has had since 1.5. This would suffice: PrintStream out = new PrintStream("filename.txt"); – Jonik Jun 28 '09 at 16:22
  • 10
    Need to close that file though at some point...? codecodex.com/wiki/ASCII_file_save#Java – JStrahl Jun 22 '12 at 8:03
  • 2
    You want to use try{} catch(){}finally{}, where in finally{} you close the file if it is not null. – Benas Aug 13 '14 at 13:34
  • 15
    In java8 you can try(PrintStream ps = new PrintStream("filename")) { ps.println(out); } this will handle close for you – Anton Chikin Feb 6 '15 at 16:14

Apache Commons IO contains some great methods for doing this, in particular FileUtils contains the following method:

static void writeStringToFile(File file, String data) 

which allows you to write text to a file in one method call:

FileUtils.writeStringToFile(new File("test.txt"), "Hello File");

You might also want to consider specifying the encoding for the file as well.

  • 10
    Just a minor correction, the second fragment should read: FileUtils.writeStringToFile(new File("test.txt"), "Hello File"); – pm_labs Feb 9 '12 at 0:31
  • 3
    For those of us who prefer Guava, it can do this too. – Jonik Dec 29 '13 at 15:50
  • 5
    The function is now deprecated, you should add the default charset --> FileUtils.writeStringToFile(new File("test.txt"), "Hello File", forName("UTF-8")); – Paul Fournel Nov 9 '17 at 8:10

Take a look at the Java File API

a quick example:

try (PrintStream out = new PrintStream(new FileOutputStream("filename.txt"))) {
    out.print(text);
}
  • @XP1 I know, that's a great improvement. I've used Lombok for this in Java 6: just go @Cleanup new FileOutputStream(...) and you're done. – Jorn Sep 4 '11 at 9:31
  • 4
    Don't forget to call out.flush(); then out.close(); – Alex Byrth Jan 11 '16 at 1:16
  • @AlexByrth why should he? – Andrew Tobilko Sep 11 at 16:51
  • 1
    Large files are recorded in the background (another thread) and take time to record. Calling flush () ensures that everything has been written on the next line, synchronizing the operation. But this is optional, but good practice if you handle large files, as logs. – Alex Byrth Sep 12 at 18:10

Just did something similar in my project. Use FileWriter will simplify part of your job. And here you can find nice tutorial.

BufferedWriter writer = null;
try
{
    writer = new BufferedWriter( new FileWriter( yourfilename));
    writer.write( yourstring);

}
catch ( IOException e)
{
}
finally
{
    try
    {
        if ( writer != null)
        writer.close( );
    }
    catch ( IOException e)
    {
    }
}
  • 3
    Removing all try/catch and simplify it I'm also able to do it in one line just by doing the: (new BufferedWriter( new FileWriter( filename))).write(str); – Artem Barger Jun 27 '09 at 19:46
  • 6
    So, show your simple and nice solution. I would be glad to learn how to do it in better way. – Artem Barger Jun 27 '09 at 20:06
  • 4
    Ignore the trolls... they always criticize without offering their own solution. Thanks for saving me from writing my own code / downloading extra library & introducing dependency... – kape123 Jan 27 '11 at 4:50
  • 1
    It seems that .close() doesn't throw (at least in Java 7?), is the last trycatch perhaps redundant? – Kos Jun 14 '12 at 10:43
  • 12
    Swallowing exceptions like that is going to make life hard for you when exceptions really do occur. At the very least you should rethrow them: throw new RuntimeException(e); – Roger Keays Feb 11 '13 at 19:05

In Java 7 you can do this:

String content = "Hello File!";
String path = "C:/a.txt";
Files.write( Paths.get(path), content.getBytes(), StandardOpenOption.CREATE);

There is more info here: http://www.drdobbs.com/jvm/java-se-7-new-file-io/231600403

  • 6
    content.getBytes() ? Encoding ??? – Mr_and_Mrs_D Apr 17 '14 at 14:43
  • 1
    In case someone later wondered, the encoding would be the platform standard. – Haakon Løtveit Nov 29 '15 at 14:12
  • 3
    content.getBytes(StandardCharsets.UTF_8) can be used to explicitly define the encoding. – John29 Apr 28 '16 at 20:43

Use FileUtils.writeStringToFile() from Apache Commons IO. No need to reinvent this particular wheel.

  • 18
    I couldn't disagree more. These libraries are there so we don't introduce subtle bugs in such a simple solution. – skaffman Jun 27 '09 at 20:04
  • 3
    No, obviously not. I'm only disagreeing that your solution might not be the first thing I'd throw at someone who's a beginner Java programmer. You aren't suggesting that you've never written such a thing, are you? – duffymo Jun 27 '09 at 21:25
  • 7
    I have, yes, but that's before I found commons-io. Since finding that, I've never written that sort of thing by hand, even in a one-class project. If I'd known about it from day one, I'd have used it from day one. – skaffman Jun 27 '09 at 21:40
  • 5
    Exactly, but you're an experienced developer. Your bio says your a JBOSS/Spring user, but certainly you wouldn't have been up to either one in your first "Hello, World" effort. I'm not disagreeing with the proper use of libraries. I'm saying that people attempting a language for the first time should try to know it at its bottom, even if that means doing things that they'll discard later on when they're experienced and know better. – duffymo Jun 27 '09 at 21:45
  • 2
    I implemented this without commons and got a less than obvious exception thrown. I then implemented this using commons and it told me exactly what was wrong. Moral of the story: why live in the dark ages if you don't have to? – SilentNot Apr 14 '14 at 17:42

You can use the modify the code below to write your file from whatever class or function is handling the text. One wonders though why the world needs a new text editor...

import java.io.*;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        try {
            String str = "SomeMoreTextIsHere";
            File newTextFile = new File("C:/thetextfile.txt");

            FileWriter fw = new FileWriter(newTextFile);
            fw.write(str);
            fw.close();

        } catch (IOException iox) {
            //do stuff with exception
            iox.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Use Apache Commons IO api. Its simple

Use API as

 FileUtils.writeStringToFile(new File("FileNameToWrite.txt"), "stringToWrite");

Maven Dependency

<dependency>
    <groupId>commons-io</groupId>
    <artifactId>commons-io</artifactId>
    <version>2.4</version>
</dependency>

I prefer to rely on libraries whenever possible for this sort of operation. This makes me less likely to accidentally omit an important step (like mistake wolfsnipes made above). Some libraries are suggested above, but my favorite for this kind of thing is Google Guava. Guava has a class called Files which works nicely for this task:

// This is where the file goes.
File destination = new File("file.txt");
// This line isn't needed, but is really useful 
// if you're a beginner and don't know where your file is going to end up.
System.out.println(destination.getAbsolutePath());
try {
    Files.write(text, destination, Charset.forName("UTF-8"));
} catch (IOException e) {
    // Useful error handling here
}
  • 2
    If you're using Guava, there is also Charsets.UTF-8. – florian Oct 30 '15 at 14:07
  • 2
    @florian: It's Charsets.UTF_8 actually – Tim Büthe Mar 29 '16 at 17:59
  • The parent folder must exist. Example: destination.mkdirs(). – AlikElzin-kilaka Jun 19 at 8:19

In case if you need create text file based on one single string:

import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Paths;

public class StringWriteSample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String text = "This is text to be saved in file";

        try {
            Files.write(Paths.get("my-file.txt"), text.getBytes());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
import java.io.*;

private void stringToFile( String text, String fileName )
 {
 try
 {
    File file = new File( fileName );

    // if file doesnt exists, then create it 
    if ( ! file.exists( ) )
    {
        file.createNewFile( );
    }

    FileWriter fw = new FileWriter( file.getAbsoluteFile( ) );
    BufferedWriter bw = new BufferedWriter( fw );
    bw.write( text );
    bw.close( );
    //System.out.println("Done writing to " + fileName); //For testing 
 }
 catch( IOException e )
 {
 System.out.println("Error: " + e);
 e.printStackTrace( );
 }
} //End method stringToFile

You can insert this method into your classes. If you are using this method in a class with a main method, change this class to static by adding the static key word. Either way you will need to import java.io.* to make it work otherwise File, FileWriter and BufferedWriter will not be recognized.

Use this, it is very readable:

import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Paths;

Files.write(Paths.get(path), lines.getBytes(), StandardOpenOption.WRITE);
  • It's also a copy of an existing answer. :c – james.garriss Jul 21 '16 at 18:14
  • 1
    sorry but i didn't invent java8 , i am not the only one that use this line . but it is not a copy past from other answers to the same question – Ran Adler Jul 24 '16 at 5:37

You could do this:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

class WriteText
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {   
        try {
            String text = "Your sample content to save in a text file.";
            BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter("sample.txt"));
            out.write(text);
            out.close();
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
            System.out.println("Exception ");       
        }

        return ;
    }
};

Using Java 7:

public static void writeToFile(String text, String targetFilePath) throws IOException
{
    Path targetPath = Paths.get(targetFilePath);
    byte[] bytes = text.getBytes(StandardCharsets.UTF_8);
    Files.write(targetPath, bytes, StandardOpenOption.CREATE);
}
  • A word to the wise - this will create a new file if it isn't there, but will overwrite the characters of the existing file if it is. If the new data is smaller, that will mean you probably create a corrupted file. Ask me how I know! – Chris Rae Feb 5 '17 at 23:29
  • Ok, how do you know? – ojblass Mar 10 at 2:58
  • Just use Files.write(targetPath, bytes); to overwrite the file then. It will work as expected. – BullyWiiPlaza Mar 10 at 12:09

Using org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils:

FileUtils.writeStringToFile(new File("log.txt"), "my string", Charset.defaultCharset());

If you only care about pushing one block of text to file, this will overwrite it each time.

JFileChooser chooser = new JFileChooser();
int returnVal = chooser.showSaveDialog(this);
if (returnVal == JFileChooser.APPROVE_OPTION) {
    FileOutputStream stream = null;
    PrintStream out = null;
    try {
        File file = chooser.getSelectedFile();
        stream = new FileOutputStream(file); 
        String text = "Your String goes here";
        out = new PrintStream(stream);
        out.print(text);                  //This will overwrite existing contents

    } catch (Exception ex) {
        //do something
    } finally {
        try {
            if(stream!=null) stream.close();
            if(out!=null) out.close();
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            //do something
        }
    }
}

This example allows the user to select a file using a file chooser.

  • @Eric Leschinski : thank you for making my answer more professional (i also assumed this was exactly what the OP wanted since this is what actually most people wants,just dump the text and replace it) – Bhathiya Perera Aug 15 '13 at 17:36
  • 2
    Once the original question has been answered and the OP is satisfied and long-gone, pages like this serve only as a useful artifact to people who land here from a Google search. I landed on this page in order to create a mini text appender to a file. So it's good to speak to the entire audience rather than the OP after the OP has moved on. – Eric Leschinski Aug 15 '13 at 20:19

It's better to close the writer/outputstream in a finally block, just in case something happen

finally{
   if(writer != null){
     try{
        writer.flush();
        writer.close();
     }
     catch(IOException ioe){
         ioe.printStackTrace();
     }
   }
}

You can use the ArrayList to put all the contents of the TextArea for exemple, and send as parameter by calling the save, as the writer just wrote string lines, then we use the "for" line by line to write our ArrayList in the end we will be content TextArea in txt file. if something does not make sense, I'm sorry is google translator and I who do not speak English.

Watch the Windows Notepad, it does not always jump lines, and shows all in one line, use Wordpad ok.


private void SaveActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {

String NameFile = Name.getText();
ArrayList< String > Text = new ArrayList< String >();

Text.add(TextArea.getText());

SaveFile(NameFile, Text);

}


public void SaveFile(String name, ArrayList< String> message) {

path = "C:\\Users\\Paulo Brito\\Desktop\\" + name + ".txt";

File file1 = new File(path);

try {

    if (!file1.exists()) {

        file1.createNewFile();
    }


    File[] files = file1.listFiles();


    FileWriter fw = new FileWriter(file1, true);

    BufferedWriter bw = new BufferedWriter(fw);

    for (int i = 0; i < message.size(); i++) {

        bw.write(message.get(i));
        bw.newLine();
    }

    bw.close();
    fw.close();

    FileReader fr = new FileReader(file1);

    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);

    fw = new FileWriter(file1, true);

    bw = new BufferedWriter(fw);

    while (br.ready()) {

        String line = br.readLine();

        System.out.println(line);

        bw.write(line);
        bw.newLine();

    }
    br.close();
    fr.close();

} catch (IOException ex) {
    ex.printStackTrace();
    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Error in" + ex);        

}

I think the best way is using Files.write(Path path, Iterable<? extends CharSequence> lines, OpenOption... options):

String text = "content";
Path path = Paths.get("path", "to", "file");
Files.write(path, Arrays.asList(text));

See javadoc:

Write lines of text to a file. Each line is a char sequence and is written to the file in sequence with each line terminated by the platform's line separator, as defined by the system property line.separator. Characters are encoded into bytes using the specified charset.

The options parameter specifies how the the file is created or opened. If no options are present then this method works as if the CREATE, TRUNCATE_EXISTING, and WRITE options are present. In other words, it opens the file for writing, creating the file if it doesn't exist, or initially truncating an existing regular-file to a size of 0. The method ensures that the file is closed when all lines have been written (or an I/O error or other runtime exception is thrown). If an I/O error occurs then it may do so after the file has created or truncated, or after some bytes have been written to the file.

Please note. I see people have already answered with Java's built-in Files.write, but what's special in my answer which nobody seems to mention is the overloaded version of the method which takes an Iterable of CharSequence (i.e. String), instead of a byte[] array, thus text.getBytes() is not required, which is a bit cleaner I think.

If you wish to keep the carriage return characters from the string into a file here is an code example:

    jLabel1 = new JLabel("Enter SQL Statements or SQL Commands:");
    orderButton = new JButton("Execute");
    textArea = new JTextArea();
    ...


    // String captured from JTextArea()
    orderButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
            // When Execute button is pressed
            String tempQuery = textArea.getText();
            tempQuery = tempQuery.replaceAll("\n", "\r\n");
            try (PrintStream out = new PrintStream(new FileOutputStream("C:/Temp/tempQuery.sql"))) {
                out.print(tempQuery);
            } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            System.out.println(tempQuery);
        }

    });

protected by ꜱᴜʀᴇꜱʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Jan 10 '14 at 9:27

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