2

I have an old program written in C with Microsoft Visual C++, and I need to implement some kind of "keepalive", so I am able to receive it thought interprocess communication into a new program which will kill and re-launch the first one if no msg has been received in the last 5 seconds.

The problem is that I have been looking for any tutorial or example of IPC for Windows in C language, but almost everything I find is for C++.

Any help or resource?

EDIT: As @Adriano suggested in answers, I'm trying to use Shared Memory. But the launcher program is being terminated by Windows due to some kind of exception I'm not being able to catch. Happens when calling CopyMemory.

The code is the following:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "windows.h"
#include "iostream"
using namespace std;

int launchMyProcess();
void killMyProcess();
bool checkIfMyProcessIsAlive();

STARTUPINFO sInfo;
PROCESS_INFORMATION pInfo;
HANDLE mappedFile;
LPVOID pSharedMemory;
long lastReceivedBeatTimeStamp;
const int MSECONDS_WITHOUT_BEAT = 500;
const LPTSTR lpCommandLine = "MyProcess.exe configuration.txt";


    int main(int argc, char* argv[])
    {
        mappedFile = CreateFileMapping(INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE, NULL, PAGE_READWRITE, 0, sizeof(int), "Global\\ActivityMonitor");
        LPVOID pSharedMemory = MapViewOfFile(mappedFile, FILE_MAP_READ, 0, 0, sizeof(int));
        if(!launchMyProcess()){
            cout<<"Error creating MyProcess.exe"<<endl;
            UnmapViewOfFile(pSharedMemory);
            CloseHandle(mappedFile);
            return -1;
        }
        while(true){
            Sleep(100);

            if(!checkIfMyProcessIsAlive()){
                cout<<"Relaunching MyProcess...";
                killMyProcess();
                if(!launchMyProcess()){
                    cout<<"Error relaunching MyProcess.exe"<<endl;
                    UnmapViewOfFile(pSharedMemory);
                    CloseHandle(mappedFile);
                    return -1;
                }
            }
        }

        UnmapViewOfFile(pSharedMemory);
        CloseHandle(mappedFile);
        return 0;
    }


    bool checkIfMyProcessIsAlive()
    {
        static int volatile latestMagicNumber = 0;
        int currentMagicNumber = 0;

        CopyMemory(&currentMagicNumber, pSharedMemory, sizeof(int));

        if(currentMagicNumber != latestMagicNumber){
            latestMagicNumber = currentMagicNumber;
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    int launchMyProcess()
    {
        ZeroMemory(&sInfo, sizeof(sInfo));
        sInfo.cb = sizeof(sInfo);
        ZeroMemory(&pInfo, sizeof(pInfo));

        return CreateProcess(NULL, lpCommandLine, NULL, NULL, FALSE, 0, NULL, NULL, &sInfo, &pInfo);
    }

    void killMyProcess()
    {
        TerminateProcess(pInfo.hProcess, 0);
        CloseHandle(pInfo.hProcess);
        CloseHandle(pInfo.hThread);
        Sleep(3000);
    }
  • It doesn't matter if tutorials are in C++, they'll be using the same C WIN32 functions. – Mahmoud Al-Qudsi May 10 '12 at 14:08
  • It doesn't, but a C tutorial would be received with joy :) – Roman Rdgz May 10 '12 at 14:12
  • so I am able to receive it thought interprocess communication into a new program is a bit vague. How, exactly, are you getting information from the old program? This doesn't sound like an IPC problem to me. If your new program spawns the old one, via CreateProcess say, then you can kill it and re-create it quite easily. – Skizz May 10 '12 at 14:14
  • Yes @Skizz the creating/terminating process is working well. Now I haven't implemented any kind of communication between the old program and the new one (launcher). I'm trying to find out which is the best approach for something as simple as emmiting a heart beat, as Mark Wilkins said – Roman Rdgz May 11 '12 at 7:34
2

If your old C application has a message pump (because it has an UI) maybe the simpliest way to check if it's alive or not is IsHungAppWindow() function and Windows will do the stuff for you.

If this is not your case and you need IPC there are many options, it depends on what kind of IPC mechanism you want to use. Here I'll just list some resources.

For an overview of IPC techniques: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa365574(v=vs.85).aspx

Some examples:

EDIT
I think a small example will clarify much more than tons of words. In this example I'll use shared memory but you can use whatever you prefer (and you feel more comfortable with). It's untested so please use it just as reference.

The MONITOR process, should be started first.

VOID CALLBACK CheckItIsAlive(PVOID lpParam, BOOLEAN TimerOrWaitFired)
{
    static int volatile latestMagicNumber = 0;

    int currentMagicNumber = 0;
    CopyMemory(&currentMagicNumber, lpParam, sizeof(int));

    if (currentMagicNumber != latestMagicNumber)
        latestMagicNumber = currentMagicNumber;
    else
    {
        // Do something, it's hanged
    }
}

void main()
{
    // Shared memory used to communicate with the other process
    HANDLE mappedFile = CreateFileMapping(INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE,
        NULL, PAGE_READWRITE, 0, sizeof(int), "Global\\MyActivityMonitor");

    LPVOID pSharedMemory = MapViewOfFile(mappedFile,
        FILE_MAP_READ, 0, 0, sizeof(int));

    // Thread used to check activity
    HANDLE queue = CreateTimerQueue();
    HANDLE hTimer = NULL;
    CreateTimerQueueTimer(&hTimer, queue, 
        (WAITORTIMERCALLBACK)CheckItIsAlive, pSharedMemory,
        0, 5000, WT_EXECUTEDEFAULT);

    // Do your work here...

    // Clean up
    DeleteTimerQueue(queue);

    UnmapViewOfFile(pSharedMemory);
    CloseHandle(mappedFile);
}

The MONITORED process, it'll signal its activity to the Monitor process.

VOID CALLBACK NotifyImAlive(PVOID lpParam, BOOLEAN TimerOrWaitFired)
{
    static int volatile counter = 1;

    int tick = counter++;
    CopyMemory(lpParam, &tick, sizeof(int));
}

void main()
{
    // Shared memory used to communicate with the other process
    HANDLE mappedFile = OpenFileMapping(FILE_MAP_ALL_ACCESS, FALSE,
        "Global\\MyActivityMonitor");

    LPVOID pSharedMemory = MapViewOfFile(mappedFile,
        FILE_MAP_WRITE, 0, 0, sizeof(int));

    // Thread used to signal activity
    HANDLE queue = CreateTimerQueue();
    HANDLE hTimer = NULL;
    CreateTimerQueueTimer(&hTimer, queue, 
        (WAITORTIMERCALLBACK)NotifyImAlive, pSharedMemory,
        0, 5000, WT_EXECUTEINTIMERTHREAD);

    // Do your work here...

    // Clean up
    DeleteTimerQueue(queue);

    UnmapViewOfFile(pSharedMemory);
    CloseHandle(mappedFile);
}

Shared memory is a pretty lightweight resource and you can use whatever you prefer for your timers (if timing isn't a strict requirement you can do some kind of idle processing. Personally I like this 'cause you won't need to lock any thread and probably you have an idle time processing thread).

Timer functions are supported starting from Windows 2000, be sure that _WIN32_WINNT macro is defined with 0x0500 (or more).

Addendum
I didn't mentioned in the list because they exist only in newer versions of OS but you may even use condition variables. Windows 8 will support a very useful WaitOnAddress function but it's still the future so I think you can't use it.

  • It's a console application... and the idea is being able to launch and kill the old program programmatically from the new program. I need something simple just to know if the program is alive so I can decide if I kill the process. Is it possible to do that? – Roman Rdgz May 10 '12 at 14:10
  • @RomanRdgz Yes, you can use one of the IPC listed in the overview (I guess the most simple one). You can use the technique introduced by Mahmoud too, you'll have some kind of "ping-pong" mechanism (signaling events created with CreateEventEx instead of CreateMutex). – Adriano Repetti May 10 '12 at 14:23
  • @RomanRdgz I didn't mention but MSDN uses "desktop application" for both console and GUI applications, it's needed to distinguish web, desktop and Metro. – Adriano Repetti May 11 '12 at 9:07
  • I still have a problem: undeclared identifier at CreateTimerQueueTimer and DeleteTimerQueueTimer. I don't know why, I have "windows.h" included – Roman Rdgz May 11 '12 at 9:26
  • @RomanRdgz It depends the version of the compiler and the SDK you're using, these functions are present from Windows 2000. Add #define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0500 before your windows.h inclusion. – Adriano Repetti May 11 '12 at 9:40
2

From the OP and the various comments, it sounds as if the main goal is to determine if the application is hung. A couple of fairly simple ways to create some kind of "heart beat" that can be monitored by another application would be either shared memory or a named semaphore.

You could use CreateFileMapping and MapViewOfFile in one process to create shared memory and then use MapViewOfFile in the other process to obtain a pointer to it. If you created it to be the size of an integer, a simple method of keep-alive would be to have the process increment the value in memory every few seconds. The other process can read it every few seconds to verify that it is changing.

With a named semaphore (CreateSemaphore and OpenSemaphore), you could do basically the same thing. Have the monitored app signal it periodically and have the monitor wait on it to make sure it has been signaled.

  • The FileMappings sounds really easy, but MSDN says that it is intended only for desktop applications, and I've got console applications here. Maybe I could try with Semaphores... but I don't want any of the processes to block waiting for a signal, so I guess it doesn't fix either to my solution. Any other idea? – Roman Rdgz May 11 '12 at 7:39
  • @RomanRdgz: I believe that a console application running in Windows would be considered a desktop app; you can call Windows API functions from a console application. – Mark Wilkins May 11 '12 at 12:26
1

This seems to be another case of going about something the very long way due to a lack of familiarity with the platform you're dealing with.

If all you need to know as you say in your comment is whether or not your program is alive so you can kill it, you don't even remotely need IPC.

In the beginning of the program you wish to monitor:

HANDLE hMutex = CreateMutex(NULL, FALSE, _T("MyMagicKey"));
WaitForSingleObject(hMutex, INFINITE);

In the "watchdog" program, you check if the other utility is alive like this:

HANDLE hMutex = OpenMutex(SYNCHRONIZE, FALSE, _T("MyMagicKey"));
if (hMutex == NULL && GetLastError() == ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND)
   //The app being watched is already dead
else
   //whatever you want

There are a half-dozen other solutions that apply equally well (or better). If your watchdog is the only one that ever creates the app that's going to be monitored, you can wait on the HANDLE from CreateProcess (or ShellExecuteEx).

  • 2
    First comment doesn't sound really polite! :) He said "kill and re-launch" then the application to monitor didn't simply dead but it may be hanged. – Adriano Repetti May 10 '12 at 14:18
  • @Adriano Yes, he did in his OP - but then in the comment to your post, he says "I need something simple just to know if the program is alive so I can decide if I kill the process." which is a completely different question.... – Mahmoud Al-Qudsi May 10 '12 at 14:23
  • As @Adriano said, I need to know if the process is hanged, not only if it has ended. That would be easy, as you have shown in the code. I need a heart beat from the old program, in such a way that if certain amount of seconds have passed since last heart beat, then I'm going to decide it is indeed hanged. – Roman Rdgz May 11 '12 at 7:42

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