2096

I have a UILabel with space for two lines of text. Sometimes, when the text is too short, this text is displayed in the vertical center of the label.

How do I vertically align the text to always be at the top of the UILabel?

image representing a UILabel with vertically-centered text

48 Answers 48

6

If creating your own custom view is an option, you could do something like this:

- (void)drawRect:(CGRect)rect
{
    CGRect bounds = self.bounds;
    [self.textColor set];
    [self.text drawInRect:bounds
                 withFont:self.font
            lineBreakMode:UILineBreakModeTailTruncation
                alignment:self.textAlignment];
}
6

In UILabel vertically text alignment is not possible. But, you can dynamically change the height of the label using sizeWithFont: method of NSString, and just set its x and y as you want.

You can use UITextField. It supports the contentVerticalAlignment peoperty as it is a subclass of UIControl. You have to set its userInteractionEnabled to NO to prevent user from typing text on it.

6

I know this is an old post but vertically aligning text is a HUGE problem (at least for me it is) and I figured that I should share this solution since I couldn't find one myself.

Using drawRect is a little expensive in my opinion. The proper way to get a UILabel to vertically align is to not use a UILabel. Use a UITextView (multiline UITextField) and observe the content property like so:

- (UITextView*)textView{
     if(!_textView){
        UIEdgeInsets insets = UIEdgeInsetsMake(0, 50, 0, 5);
        CGRect frame = CGRectMake(0.0f, 0.0f, 100.0f, 100.0f);
        _textView = [[UITextView alloc]initWithFrame:UIEdgeInsetsInsetRect(frame, insets)];
        _textView.delegate = self;
        _textView.scrollEnabled = YES;
        _textView.bounces = YES;
        _textView.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];
        [_textView setUserInteractionEnabled:NO];
        [_textView addObserver:self forKeyPath:@"contentSize" options:(NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew) context:NULL];
    }
    return _textView;
}

 -(void)observeValueForKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath ofObject:(id)object change:    (NSDictionary *)change context:(void *)context {
UITextView *tv = object;

CGFloat height = [tv bounds].size.height;
CGFloat contentheight;

#ifdef __IPHONE_7_0
    contentheight = [tv sizeThatFits:CGSizeMake(tv.frame.size.width, FLT_MAX)].height;
#else
    contentheight = [tv contentSize].height;
#endif

    switch(self.verticalAlignment) {
        case VerticalAlignmentBottom:{
            CGFloat topCorrect = ([tv bounds].size.height - contentheight);
            topCorrect = (topCorrect <0.0 ? 0.0 : topCorrect);
            tv.contentOffset = (CGPoint){.x = 0, .y = -topCorrect};
        }
        break;
        case VerticalAlignmentMiddle:{
            CGFloat topCorrect = (height - contentheight * [tv zoomScale])/2.0;
            topCorrect = ( topCorrect < 0.0 ? 0.0 : topCorrect );
            tv.contentOffset = (CGPoint){.x = 0, .y = -topCorrect};
        }
            break;
        case VerticalAlignmentTop:{
            tv.contentOffset = (CGPoint){.x = 0, .y = 0 };
        }
            break;
        default:
            break;
    }
}

Basically what's happening here is we set the class we're in as the observer, looking at the contentSize property with an option of NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew so every time the content changes, -(void)observeValueForKeyPath:ofObject:change:context: will get called and then you can calculate an offset size to align the text appropriately.

I can't take credit for this, the original idea came from here. But, this solution doesn't work on iOS7. After trolling around SO for a few hours, I found this: iOS 7 vertical alignment fix. The key line there is contentheight = [tv sizeThatFits:CGSizeMake(tv.frame.size.width, FLT_MAX)].height;. For some reason in iOS 7, getting the contentSize height doesn't work but that fixes it. Neither of the two solutions worked on their own but after a little tinkering, I was able to synthesize together the above solution.

6

Swift 2.0:

Make constant enum values in a empty Swift file.

//  AppRef.swift

import UIKit
import Foundation

enum UILabelTextPositions : String {

 case VERTICAL_ALIGNMENT_TOP = "VerticalAlignmentTop"
 case VERTICAL_ALIGNMENT_MIDDLE = "VerticalAlignmentMiddle"
 case VERTICAL_ALIGNMENT_BOTTOM = "VerticalAlignmentBottom"

}

Using UILabel Extension:

Make a empty Swift class and name it. Add the following

//  AppExtensions.swift

import Foundation
import UIKit

extension UILabel{ 
 func makeLabelTextPosition (sampleLabel :UILabel?, positionIdentifier : String) -> UILabel
 {
  let rect = sampleLabel!.textRectForBounds(bounds, limitedToNumberOfLines: 0)

  switch positionIdentifier
  {
  case "VerticalAlignmentTop":
   sampleLabel!.frame = CGRectMake(bounds.origin.x+5, bounds.origin.y, rect.size.width, rect.size.height)
   break;

  case "VerticalAlignmentMiddle":
   sampleLabel!.frame = CGRectMake(bounds.origin.x+5,bounds.origin.y + (bounds.size.height - rect.size.height) / 2,
    rect.size.width, rect.size.height);
   break;

  case "VerticalAlignmentBottom":
   sampleLabel!.frame = CGRectMake(bounds.origin.x+5, bounds.origin.y + (bounds.size.height - rect.size.height),rect.size.width, rect.size.height);
   break;

  default:
   sampleLabel!.frame = bounds;
   break;
  }
  return sampleLabel!

 }
}

Usage :

myMessageLabel.makeLabelTextPosition(messageLabel, positionIdentifier: UILabelTextPositions.VERTICAL_ALIGNMENT_TOP.rawValue)
5

I riffed off dalewking's suggestion and added a UIEdgeInset to allow for an adjustable margin. nice work around.

- (id)init
{
    if (self = [super init]) {
        contentEdgeInsets = UIEdgeInsetsZero;
    }

    return self;
}

- (void)layoutSubviews
{
    CGRect localBounds = self.bounds;
    localBounds = CGRectMake(MAX(0, localBounds.origin.x + contentEdgeInsets.left), 
                             MAX(0, localBounds.origin.y + contentEdgeInsets.top), 
                             MIN(localBounds.size.width, localBounds.size.width - (contentEdgeInsets.left + contentEdgeInsets.right)), 
                             MIN(localBounds.size.height, localBounds.size.height - (contentEdgeInsets.top + contentEdgeInsets.bottom)));

    for (UIView *subview in self.subviews) {
        if ([subview isKindOfClass:[UILabel class]]) {
            UILabel *label = (UILabel*)subview;
            CGSize lineSize = [label.text sizeWithFont:label.font];
            CGSize sizeForText = [label.text sizeWithFont:label.font constrainedToSize:localBounds.size lineBreakMode:label.lineBreakMode];

            NSInteger numberOfLines = ceilf(sizeForText.height/lineSize.height);

            label.numberOfLines = numberOfLines;
            label.frame = CGRectMake(MAX(0, contentEdgeInsets.left), MAX(0, contentEdgeInsets.top), localBounds.size.width, MIN(localBounds.size.height, lineSize.height * numberOfLines)); 
        }
    }
}
5

I was working on that particular problem as well, so I've taken the ideas by D.S. and nevan king and basically combined them into a subclass that implements a vertical alignment property, which also allows you to change the alignment more than just once. It borrows the UIControlContentVerticalAlignment type and also supports UIControlContentVerticalAlignmentFill.

From what I've seen, numberOfLines seems to be useless when it comes to vertical alignment, so in this subclass it is always set to 0 when applying vertical alignment. Also, you still have to set lineBreakMode yourself in case you want a multi-line text label.

There it is: QALabel on GitHub

5

For Swift 3...

@IBDesignable class TopAlignedLabel: UILabel {
    override func drawText(in rect: CGRect) {
        if let stringText = text {
            let stringTextAsNSString = stringText as NSString
            let labelStringSize = stringTextAsNSString.boundingRect(with: CGSize(width: self.frame.width,height: CGFloat.greatestFiniteMagnitude),
                                                                            options: NSStringDrawingOptions.usesLineFragmentOrigin,
                                                                            attributes: [NSFontAttributeName: font],
                                                                            context: nil).size
            super.drawText(in: CGRect(x:0,y: 0,width: self.frame.width, height:ceil(labelStringSize.height)))
        } else {
            super.drawText(in: rect)
        }
    }
    override func prepareForInterfaceBuilder() {
        super.prepareForInterfaceBuilder()
        layer.borderWidth = 1
        layer.borderColor = UIColor.black.cgColor
    }
}
4

There are two ways to fix this problem.One is

[mylabel setNumberOfLines:0];
[mylabel sizeToFit];

But the second way is more reliable for this approach, i.e,

 CGSize sizeToFit = [label.text sizeWithFont:label.font constrainedToSize:maxSize lineBreakMode:label.lineBreakMode];
 [mylabel setFrame:CGRectMake(mylabel.frame.origin.x, mylabel.frame.origin.y, sizeToFit.width, sizeToFit.height)];

entering "\n" is not such a good thing but yes if you know the constraints and the size of the data going to be displayed, may be it work good but cannot be expandable if text is longer than size of the label. The Second way ultimately set the frame according to the size of the text going to be displayed.

4
yourLabel.baselineAdjustment = UIBaselineAdjustmentAlignCenters;
4

For those of you with custom table cells attempting to fix this issue, add this to your custom table cell class:

Swift 2.2:

override func layoutSubviews() {
    labelName.sizeToFit()
}

This solved my issue.

4

(As of March 7, 2018)

Swift 4

let maxFrameHeight = 75

myLabel = UILabel()
myLabel.frame = CGRect(x: 9, y: 9, width: 126, height: maxFrameHeight)
myLabel.text = "my labels text displayed"
myLabel.numberOfLines = 0

myLabel.sizeToFit()
let newFrameHeight = myLabel.frame.size.height
let safeNewHeight = min(newFrameHeight, maxFrameHeight)

myLabel.frame = CGRect(x: 9, y: 9, width: 126, height: safeNewHeight)

This will get the desired outcome, and it will make sure the new height of the UILabel doesn't pass a certain maximum height you desire for this label.

  • 1
    It works well, but you have to set numberOfLines = 0! – Ivan Carosati Mar 9 '18 at 5:16
3

Instead of using sizeToFit, you could manually change the label's height;

CGSize size = [descLabel.text sizeWithFont:descLabel.font constrainedToSize:CGSizeMake(labelWidth, labelHeight)];
CGRect frame = descLabel.frame;
frame.size.height = size.height;    
[yourLabel setFrame:frame];

The size returned will be the best fit for the content of your label. If the label's height is fitted to its content, you wouldn't have problems with the content being positioned on the center of the label.

3

This code helps you to make the text aligned to top and also to make the label height to be fixed the text content.

instruction to use the below code

isHeightToChange by default it is true makes the height of label to same as text content automatically. isHeightToChange if it false make the text aligned to top with out decreasing the height of the label.

#import "DynamicHeightLable.h"

@implementation DynamicHeightLable
@synthesize isHeightToChange;
- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame 
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];
    if (self)
    {
        // Initialization code.
        self.isHeightToChange=FALSE;//default

    }
    return self;
}
- (void)drawTextInRect:(CGRect)rect
{
    if(!isHeightToChange){
    CGSize maximumLabelSize = CGSizeMake(self.frame.size.width,2500);

    CGFloat height = [self.text sizeWithFont:self.font
                           constrainedToSize:maximumLabelSize
                               lineBreakMode:self.lineBreakMode].height;
    if (self.numberOfLines != 0) {
        height = MIN(height, self.font.lineHeight * self.numberOfLines);
    }
    rect.size.height = MIN(rect.size.height, height);
    }
    [super drawTextInRect:rect];

}
- (void) layoutSubviews
{
    [super layoutSubviews];
       if(isHeightToChange){
     CGRect ltempFrame = self.frame;
    CGSize maximumLabelSize = CGSizeMake(self.frame.size.width,2500);

    CGFloat height = [self.text sizeWithFont:self.font
                           constrainedToSize:maximumLabelSize
                               lineBreakMode:self.lineBreakMode].height;
    if (self.numberOfLines != 0) {
        height = MIN(height, self.font.lineHeight * self.numberOfLines);
    }
    ltempFrame.size.height = MIN(ltempFrame.size.height, height);

    ltempFrame.size.height=ltempFrame.size.height;
    self.frame=ltempFrame;
       }
}
@end
2

Building on all the other solutions posted, I made a simple little UILabel subclass that will handle vertical alignment for you when setting its alignment property. This will also update the label on orientation changes as well, will constrain the height to the text, and keep the label's width at it's original size.

.h

@interface VAlignLabel : UILabel
@property (nonatomic, assign) WBZVerticalAlignment alignment;
@end


.m

 -(void)setAlignment:(WBZVerticalAlignment)alignment{

    _alignment = alignment;

    CGSize s = [self.text sizeWithFont:self.font constrainedToSize:CGSizeMake(self.frame.size.width, 9999) lineBreakMode:NSLineBreakByWordWrapping];

    switch (_alignment)
    {
        case wbzLabelAlignmentVerticallyTop:
            self.frame = CGRectMake(self.frame.origin.x, self.frame.origin.y, self.frame.size.width, s.height);
            break;
        case wbzLabelAlignmentVerticallyMiddle:
            self.frame = CGRectMake(self.frame.origin.x, self.frame.origin.y + (self.frame.size.height - s.height)/2, self.frame.size.width, s.height);
            break;
        case wbzLabelAlignmentVerticallyBottom:
            self.frame = CGRectMake(self.frame.origin.x, self.frame.origin.y + (self.frame.size.height - s.height), self.frame.size.width, s.height);
            break;
        default:
            break;
    }
}

-(void)layoutSubviews{
    [self setAlignment:self.alignment];
}
1

Simple solution to this problem...

Place a UIStackView bellow the label.

Then use AutoLayout to set a vertical spacing of zero to the label and constraint the top to what was previously the bottom of the label. The label won't grow, the stackView will. What I like about this is that the stack view is non rendering. So it's not really wasting time rendering. Even though it makes AutoLayout calculations.

You probably will need to play with ContentHugging and Resistance though but that's simple as well.

Every now and then I google this problem and come back here. This time I had an ideia that I think is the easiest, and I don't think it's bad performance wise. I must say that I'm just using AutoLayout and don't really want to bother calculating frames. That's just... yuck.

0

Here's a solution in Swift 4.0:

func viewDidLoad() {

    super.viewDidLoad()

    // 20 point top and left margin. Sized to leave 20 pt at right.
    let labelFrame = CGRect(x: 20, y: 20, width: 280, height: 150)
    let myLabel = UILabel(frame: labelFrame)
    myLabel.backgroundColor = UIColor.orange

    let labelText = "I am the very model of a modern Major-General, 
    I've information vegetable, animal, and mineral"
    myLabel.text = labelText

    // Tell the label to use an unlimited number of lines
    myLabel.numberOfLines = 0
    myLabel.sizeToFit()

    view.addSubview(myLabel) // add label
}
0

It can be done with more flexibility setting a height constraint to the label in Interface Builder, binding it to the code with an IBOutlet and changing that height to show the text in a concrete vertical position. Example for center and bottom alignment:

labelHeightConstraint.constant = centerAlignment ? 30 : 15
layoutIfNeeded()
-1

Try this !! Too manual but works perfect for me.

[labelName setText:@"This is just a demo"];

NSMutableString *yourString1= @"This is just a demo";


// breaking string
labelName.lineBreakMode=UILineBreakModeTailTruncation;
labelName.numberOfLines = 3;


CGSize maximumLabelSize1 = CGSizeMake(276,37); // Your Maximum text size

CGSize expectedLabelSize1 = [yourString1 sizeWithFont:labelName.font
                                    constrainedToSize:maximumLabelSize1
                                        lineBreakMode:labelName.lineBreakMode];

[labelName setText:yourString1];


CGRect newFrame1 = labelName.frame;
if (expectedLabelSize1.height>=10)
{
    newFrame1.size.height = expectedLabelSize1.height;
}

labelName.frame = newFrame1;

protected by NullPoiиteя Jun 10 '13 at 5:08

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