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I cannot understand these 2 strange behaviour

1. First Behaviour

I have declared a variable like this

double[][] dd =
{
    new double[10],
    new double[10]
};

It does not give error.

But if i do like this it gives error

double[][] dd;

dd = { // Here it gives 2 errors says Invalid Expression { and ; expected 
      new double[10], 
      new double[10] //Here and in the above line it says only  
                     //assignment, call, increment....can be used as a statement
     };

Error is gone if i do this

double[][] dd;

dd = new double[][]{
                     new double[10],
                     new double[10]
                   };

Why?

2. Second Behaviour

More over it does not error if an extra comma , is put after last element of array in any of the above cases

{
 new double[10],
 new double[10], //This comma here is not given as error. Why?
};

Should that extra comma not specify that one more entity should be added after it.

4

Quite old docs, but still relevant. What you're looking at are Array Initializers

Array initializers may be specified in field declarations (Section 10.4), local variable declarations (Section 8.5.1), and array creation expressions (Section 7.5.10.2).

Note, it doesn't say that they're available in assignment statements, which is what you're attempting with your first error.


To your second question, the reason why the extra , is allowed is convenience - it's especially useful if code is being generated programmatically if you don't have to special case the first or last item. You'll find similar syntax in e.g. enum declarations.

1
  1. Your examples are examples of C#'s Array Initializer syntax. An initializer expression can only occur on the line where you define the variable. It looks to me like you're expecting the {} notation to be much like, say, Python or Ruby's [] array literal expressions. They're not really.

  2. It allows that trailing comma simply to make it easier an more uniform to have a list of items that go in your initializer that changes length over time. For example, since you have that comma there, adding a new item to the end only involves editing one line, and not editing one line to add a comma and another line to add the new content.

0
  1. First is due to Array Initializers as being mentioned by others. The similar behavior is extended to other objects using Object Initializers, and Collection Initializers.

  2. See the Jon Skeet answer for .NET now support trailing comma in array like python does

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