In my serialiser/deserialiser, I have the following snippet:

    if (element_type.IsValueType && collection_type.IsArray)
    {
        try
        {
            GCHandle h = GCHandle.Alloc(array_object, GCHandleType.Pinned);
            int arrayDataSize = Marshal.SizeOf(element_type) * c.Count;
            var array_data = new byte[arrayDataSize];
            Marshal.Copy(h.AddrOfPinnedObject(), array_data, 0, arrayDataSize);
            h.Free();
            WriteByteArray(array_data);

            return;
        }
        catch (ArgumentException)
        {
            //if the value type is not blittable, then we need to serialise each array item one at a time
        }
    }

The purpose of which is to try and write an array of value types to a stream, in the most efficient way possible (that is, just the content as a bunch of bytes).

The problem comes when the type is a value type but not blittable, and Alloc() fails. At the moment the exception is caught and control passed to code which deals with the array as if it consisted of reference types.

This check however (due to the throwing and catching of the exception which I understand is very slow) is proving to be a severe bottleneck due to the number of value types that are encountered in my application. So I am wondering, what is the fastest way to check if a type is blittable?

  • I had the same problem, I've ended up caching results for each type (e.g. in static dictionary). Checking was done same as here, try/catch. – Ondrej Petrzilka Jan 18 '14 at 2:08
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm using generic class to cache results. Test is done in same way (trying to allocate pinned handle).

public static class BlittableHelper<T>
{
    public static readonly bool IsBlittable;

    static BlittableHelper()
    {
        try
        {
            // Class test
            if (default(T) != null)
            {
                // Non-blittable types cannot allocate pinned handle
                GCHandle.Alloc(default(T), GCHandleType.Pinned).Free();
                IsBlittable = true;
            }
        }
        catch { }
    }
}
  • Caching is what I ended up doing, though I think your caching technique here is the most efficient I have seen! – sebf Feb 16 '15 at 23:00
  • Note that this won't work on Mono, because GCHandle.Alloc doesn't throw an exception for non blittable types. See github.com/mono/mono/pull/4533 – Jay Lemmon Sep 26 at 10:37

The current answer works for the questioner's case but, according to the specification, arrays of blittable value types are also blittable types themselves. Extended Ondřej's method a bit, so it takes this into account, and also works for reference types:

public static bool IsBlittable<T>()
{
    return IsBlittableCache<T>.Value;
}

public static bool IsBlittable(Type type)
{
    if(type.IsArray)
    {
        var elem = type.GetElementType();
        return elem.IsValueType && IsBlittable(elem);
    }
    try{
        object instance = FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(type);
        GCHandle.Alloc(instance, GCHandleType.Pinned).Free();
        return true;
    }catch{
        return false;
    }
}

private static class IsBlittableCache<T>
{
    public static readonly bool Value = IsBlittable(typeof(T));
}

As a side effect, this returns (albeit correctly) false for string, because GetUninitializedObject can't create it. Assuming Alloc really checks for blittability (except for string), this should be reliable.

  • This will return false with int[] which is nevertheless blittable. Remove the NOT from !elem.IsValueType to fix :) – FooBarTheLittle Nov 4 '15 at 12:39
  • @FooBarTheLittle Thank you! – IllidanS4 Nov 4 '15 at 19:11
  • You're welcome. – FooBarTheLittle Dec 9 '15 at 16:39

The excellent code by @IllidanS4 on this page incorrectly returns false for arrays where the element is a blittable formatted type, meaning that the array is blittable also. Starting from that example, I fixed that problem and added handling for a few more mishandled cases, such as:

  • T[] where T : formatted-type (just mentioned)
  • jagged arrays int[][][]...
  • enums (but not System.Enum ittself)
  • interfaces, abstract types
  • generic types (never blittable).

I also added made the cases for avoiding the expensive Exception block a bit more exhaustive and ran unit tests for all the different kinds of types I could think of.

public static bool IsBlittable(this Type T)
{
    while (T.IsArray)
        T = T.GetElementType();

    bool b;
    if (!((b = T.IsPrimitive || T.IsEnum) || T.IsAbstract || T.IsAutoLayout || T.IsGenericType))
        try
        {
            GCHandle.Alloc(FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(T), GCHandleType.Pinned).Free();
            b = true;
        }
        catch { }
    return b;
}

The nice caching mechanism from the other answer should be used as-is.

  • Nice idea to check for other types. There is only a slight mistake, bool and char, while primitive, aren't blittable (size depends on platform). Also jagged arrays shouldn't be blittable, as they are arrays of object references. Neither are multidimensional arrays, per MSDN, though my code has the same issue. – IllidanS4 Feb 7 '17 at 11:14

Use http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.type.islayoutsequential.aspx and http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.type.isexplicitlayout.aspx:

element_type.IsValueType && collection_type.IsArray && (element_type.IsLayoutSequential || element_type.IsExplicitLayout)
  • 2
    Thanks but unfortunately this does not work. The IsLayoutSequential property is true for at least one non-blittable type I tried (a simple struct with a string). – sebf May 14 '12 at 18:23

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