23

I want to count two things under different conditions in one query.

SELECT COUNT(*) AS count FROM table_name WHERE name = ?

and

SELECT COUNT(*) as count FROM table_name WHERE address = ? AND port = ?

I need to have a count for rows that have a certain address and certain port, and a SEPARATE count for rows that have a certain name.

I'm aware that I could do

SELECT (COUNT*) as count FROM table_name WHERE (address = ? AND port = ?) OR name = ?

However that is a single count, and I need them to be separate so I can display a more accurate message to the user.

How might I go about doing this? Help would be appreciated!

4 Answers 4

45

What about simply:

SELECT 
    SUM(IF(name = ?, 1, 0)) AS name_count,
    SUM(IF(address = ? AND port = ?, 1, 0)) AS addr_count
FROM 
    table_name
1
  • I think this would be about the same as bobwienholt's in terms of performance, but if one of name, address or port are indexed, it may be faster to add these conditions to the WHERE clause as well: WHERE name = ? OR (address = ? AND port = ?) May 14, 2012 at 1:22
9
SELECT SUM(CASE WHEN Name = ? THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) as name_match
       , SUM(CASE WHEN Address = ? AND Port = ? THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) as address_match
FROM table_name
WHERE (address = ? AND port = ?) OR name = ?
1
  • From what I can tell, this query would be faster than the other two solutions. Would you agree? May 14, 2012 at 1:06
4
SELECT 
  COUNT( CASE WHEN n1 = 'J' THEN 1 END ) AS t1,
  COUNT( CASE WHEN n2 = 'C' THEN 1 END ) AS t2,
  COUNT( CASE WHEN n3 = 'K' THEN 1 END ) AS t3 
FROM test

Using COUNT(CASE...), you can get the count of two-column from single table, even when conditions for both are different (eg: Get count of J from n1 column and count of C from n2 column, and so on..)

Table: test

+----+----+----+----+
| id | n1 | n2 | n3 |
|----+----+----+----+
|  1 | J  | C  | K  |
|----+----+----+----+
|  1 | J  | C  | F  |
|----+----+----+----+
|  1 | J  | K  | C  |
|----+----+----+----+
|  1 | K  | K  | C  |
|----+----+----+----+

Result:

+----+----+----+
| t1 | t2 | t3 |
|----+----+----+
|  3 | 2  | 1  |
|----+----+----+
2

Might be easiest just to do a Union:

SELECT COUNT(*) AS count FROM table_name WHERE name = ? 
    GROUP BY name
UNION ALL
SELECT COUNT(*) as count FROM table_name WHERE address = ? AND port = ?
    GROUP BY address, port
8
  • 1
    I've never actually used a UNION before, but I'm thinking that @bobwienholt's query would be faster. What do you think? May 14, 2012 at 1:03
  • 2
    @DrAgonmoray It's a good question, and I don't really know ... I'm actually inclined to think this way would be faster if there's an index on name as well as address or port. Count is very fast for an indexed column, whereas adding a case statement might require a scan of all the rows. YMMV :)
    – McGarnagle
    May 14, 2012 at 1:06
  • 1
    I tend to agree with dbaseman's assessment. However, I tend to use my method in queries where the WHERE clause is looking at columns different then the ones I'm counting values in. In that case, my method would probably be faster. May 14, 2012 at 1:10
  • Hmm, good to know. Here's a question: if indexing columns makes things faster, not index everything? (Probably because then it would just be like a normal table) So here's a better question: Where do I draw the line concerning how many/what rows I index? May 14, 2012 at 1:12
  • 1
    @DrAgonmoray Yeah, it's always a trade-off with indices. Adding an index makes every insert operation a bit slower, and takes up more disk space. So you have to add them judiciously.
    – McGarnagle
    May 14, 2012 at 1:20

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