960

I want to add a comma in the thousands place for a number.

Would String.Format() be the correct path to take? What format would I use?

0

22 Answers 22

1409
String.Format("{0:n}", 1234);  // Output: 1,234.00
String.Format("{0:n0}", 9876); // No digits after the decimal point. Output: 9,876
9
  • 15
    How can I replicate the "N" specifier but with as many decimal digits as are present in the number? Nov 23, 2012 at 10:33
  • 59
    @Justin: According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0c899ak8.aspx, the ',' (and the '.') are replaced with the correct localized characters. Mar 4, 2013 at 9:29
  • 2
    If you want to force a decimal format on your page other than the system defined format, you can change the CurrentCulture like this example: var nlBE = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("nl-BE"); nlBE.NumberFormat.CurrencyDecimalDigits = 2; nlBE.NumberFormat.CurrencyDecimalSeparator = ","; nlBE.NumberFormat.CurrencyGroupSeparator = "."; System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = nlBE;
    – DerpyNerd
    Oct 11, 2016 at 6:05
  • 9
    @VVVV - then you are probably passing in a string instead of a number. If you have a string, you need to first convert to float or double. Try string.Format("{0:n0}", Double.Parse(yourValue)); Oct 26, 2017 at 2:51
  • 2
    To replicate the behavior of the n specifier, but with as many decimal digits that are present in the number itself, I had to go with this format string instead #,##0.## (from another answer here)
    – evilkos
    Feb 14, 2018 at 9:37
436

I found this to be the simplest way:

myInteger.ToString("N0")
8
  • 1
    You can also use it with string.Format, as in string.Format("Here is some number with commas, and no decimals, {0:N0}", 123456789(; Oct 21, 2011 at 2:52
  • 17
    shouldn't it be myInteger.ToString("N0") ... string.tostring i don't think would work. May 14, 2014 at 22:05
  • 1
    I know it's been 5 years now, but thanks! It works for numbers > 4 characters, and < 4 characters.
    – AskYous
    May 18, 2015 at 16:21
  • 1
    @AskYous - Well, it also works for 4 characters.. Might as well say it works for any length. Nov 17, 2017 at 15:27
  • 1
    This is working but it's changing on regional settings
    – saulyasar
    Mar 27, 2018 at 14:38
159
int number = 1000000000;
string whatYouWant = number.ToString("#,##0");
//You get: 1,000,000,000
8
  • 31
    This solution is not good from an internationalisation point of view - other cultures use characters other than , as a thousands separator, for example a space or even ..
    – Justin
    Jan 31, 2012 at 17:04
  • 7
    Works thanks + 1. Have extended so shows up to 2 d.p. number.ToString("#,##0.##") Mar 30, 2012 at 10:38
  • 8
    @MacSigler It's actually not true, see Roger Lipscombe's comment on the answer above: String.Format will apply localization automatically. Oct 17, 2013 at 19:34
  • 12
    @MacSigler That's the thing though, this code does not always print out a comma. Only when the culture is one that expects commas (e.g. en-US or invariant). If the culture is one that expects another separator (e.g. .), .NET will automatically replace the comma with that separator. Again, I urge you to read the link posted by Roger if you still do not understand why this is. Oct 18, 2013 at 18:33
  • 4
    @MacSigler Justin's comment is still correct in that if you don't explicitly force the culture to en-US it will inherit culture settings from the local machine. My understanding is that compiling the code above, then running it on two machines with different cultures (with different number separators) would produce different results. If you want it to always produce a comma, you need to explicitly set a culture that uses the comma (e.g. invariant). Oct 22, 2013 at 14:12
111

If you want culture specific, you might want to try this:

use namespace:"using System.Globalization;"

(19950000.0).ToString("N",new CultureInfo("en-US")) = 19,950,000.00

(19950000.0).ToString("N",new CultureInfo("is-IS")) = 19.950.000,00

Indian culture: (19950000.0).ToString("N",new CultureInfo("hi-IN"))= 1,99,50,000.00

Note: Some cultures use , to mean decimal rather than . so be careful.

1
  • 2
    Bingo! (and "N0" to hide decimal) Feb 25, 2021 at 18:42
90

Standard formats, with their related outputs,

Console.WriteLine("Standard Numeric Format Specifiers");
String s = String.Format("(C) Currency: . . . . . . . . {0:C}\n" +
                    "(D) Decimal:. . . . . . . . . {0:D}\n" +
                    "(E) Scientific: . . . . . . . {1:E}\n" +
                    "(F) Fixed point:. . . . . . . {1:F}\n" +
                    "(G) General:. . . . . . . . . {0:G}\n" +
                    "    (default):. . . . . . . . {0} (default = 'G')\n" +
                    "(N) Number: . . . . . . . . . {0:N}\n" +
                    "(P) Percent:. . . . . . . . . {1:P}\n" +
                    "(R) Round-trip: . . . . . . . {1:R}\n" +
                    "(X) Hexadecimal:. . . . . . . {0:X}\n",
                    - 1234, -1234.565F);
Console.WriteLine(s);

Example output (en-us culture):

(C) Currency: . . . . . . . . ($1,234.00)
(D) Decimal:. . . . . . . . . -1234
(E) Scientific: . . . . . . . -1.234565E+003
(F) Fixed point:. . . . . . . -1234.57
(G) General:. . . . . . . . . -1234
    (default):. . . . . . . . -1234 (default = 'G')
(N) Number: . . . . . . . . . -1,234.00
(P) Percent:. . . . . . . . . -123,456.50 %
(R) Round-trip: . . . . . . . -1234.565
(X) Hexadecimal:. . . . . . . FFFFFB2E
2
  • 2
    This answer packed a lot of useful information. Learning by example I see now what the 0 and 1 mean in the string format.
    – user420667
    Nov 2, 2016 at 16:58
  • Wow, really nice explanation Apr 19 at 15:38
54

This is the best format. Works in all of those cases:

String.Format( "{0:#,##0.##}", 0 ); // 0
String.Format( "{0:#,##0.##}", 0.5 ); // 0.5 - some of the formats above fail here. 
String.Format( "{0:#,##0.##}", 12314 ); // 12,314
String.Format( "{0:#,##0.##}", 12314.23123 ); // 12,314.23
String.Format( "{0:#,##0.##}", 12314.2 ); // 12,314.2
String.Format( "{0:#,##0.##}", 1231412314.2 ); // 1,231,412,314.2
2
  • 1
    What if I want dots as thousand separator and comma as decimal delimiter?
    – FrenkyB
    Sep 12, 2017 at 14:16
  • upvoted because it doesn't display 12,314.0 (like the n1 format) but 12,314 :)
    – NDUF
    Apr 26, 2018 at 8:59
44

The most voted answer was great and has been helpful for about 7 years. With the introduction of C# 6.0 and specifically the String Interpolation there's a neater and, IMO safer, way to do what has been asked to add commas in thousands place for a number:

var i = 5222000;
var s = $"{i:n} is the number"; // results to > 5,222,000.00 is the number
s = $"{i:n0} has no decimal"; // results to > 5,222,000 has no decimal

Where the variable i is put in place of the placeholder (i.e. {0}). So there's no need to remember which object goes to which position. The formatting (i.e. :n) hasn't changed. For a complete feature of what's new, you may go to this page.

38

just simple as this:

float num = 23658; // for example 
num = num.ToString("N0"); // Returns 23,658

more info is in Here

33
String.Format("{0:#,###,###.##}", MyNumber)

That will give you commas at the relevant points.

7
  • 11
    The ":n" method is better since it should respect the user's locale.
    – Torlack
    Sep 19, 2008 at 21:30
  • 15
    This is true, but it's not guaranteed to give you commas at the thousand point because it respect the user's locale. Sep 19, 2008 at 21:35
  • 2
    right back at you: that is true, but it's not guaranteed to respect the user's locale because it uses commas as thousands separator. (As an example, in Portugal the comma is instead the decimal separator.)
    – ANeves
    May 19, 2010 at 17:46
  • 1
    If you want to enforce values after the . you need to replace the # with a 0. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0c899ak8(v=vs.110).aspx: Zero replaces the zero with the corresponding digit if one is present; otherwise, zero appears in the result string whereas the "#" symbol is replaced with the corresponding digit if one is present; otherwise, no digit appears in the result string. Feb 6, 2014 at 9:29
  • this method worked ok for my requirement, the msdn page about the Int32.ToString method that would be a primary place it would be used msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8wch342y.aspx isn't very helpful for this particular application either Mar 25, 2014 at 0:24
24

The following example displays several values that are formatted by using custom format strings that include zero placeholders.

String.Format("{0:N1}", 29255.0);

Or

29255.0.ToString("N1")

result "29,255.0"

String.Format("{0:N2}", 29255.0);

Or

29255.0.ToString("N2")

result "29,255.00"

3
  • nice answer but what about 29.255,00 ?
    – Roxy'Pro
    May 10, 2019 at 11:15
  • @Roxy'Pro Change the locale / culture? May 12, 2019 at 19:32
  • @MaartenBodewes I thought there is corresponding letter like "N1", "F1" or smth like that =) But chaning culture would work definatelly..
    – Roxy'Pro
    May 12, 2019 at 21:59
21

If you wish to force a "," separator regardless of culture (for example in a trace or log message), the following code will work and has the added benefit of telling the next guy who stumbles across it exactly what you are doing.

int integerValue = 19400320; 
string formatted = string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, "{0:N0}", integerValue);

sets formatted to "19,400,320"

20

C# 7.1 (perhaps earlier?) makes this as easy and nice-looking as it should be, with string interpolation:

var jackpot = 1_000_000; // underscore separators in numeric literals also available since C# 7.0
var niceNumberString = $"Jackpot is {jackpot:n}";
var niceMoneyString = $"Jackpot is {jackpot:C}";
2
13

Simpler, using string interpolation instead of String.Format

 $"{12456:n0}"; // 12,456
 $"{12456:n2}"; // 12,456.00

or using yourVariable

 double yourVariable = 12456.0;
 $"{yourVariable:n0}"; 
 $"{yourVariable:n2}"; 
11
int num = 98765432;
Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0:#,#}", num));
1
  • 3
    Or Console.WriteLine("{0:#,#}",num); if you just want to print it. But string.Format(...) is more useful I guess.
    – Indy9000
    Aug 25, 2011 at 14:42
11

For example String.Format("{0:0,0}", 1); returns 01, for me is not valid

This works for me

19950000.ToString("#,#", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture));

output 19,950,000

1
  • but if we take 19950000 value into variable and do like this var test = "19950000"; test.ToString("#,#", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)); its not wokring
    – Neo
    Sep 28, 2020 at 6:45
9

Note that the value that you're formatting should be numeric. It doesn't look like it will take a string representation of a number and format is with commas.

6
String.Format("0,###.###"); also works with decimal places
3

You can use a function such as this to format numbers and optionally pass in the desired decimal places. If decimal places are not specified it will use two decimal places.

    public static string formatNumber(decimal valueIn=0, int decimalPlaces=2)
    {
        return string.Format("{0:n" + decimalPlaces.ToString() + "}", valueIn);
    }

I use decimal but you can change the type to any other or use an anonymous object. You could also add error checking for negative decimal place values.

3

You want same Format value and culture specific.

 Double value= 1234567;
 value.ToString("#,#.##", CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("hi-IN"));

Output: 12,34,567

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  • 1
    This is very specific to the India Culture, it would be better to use a more generic answer. Sep 13, 2021 at 9:14
1

I tried many of the suggestions above but the below work better for me:

string.Format("{0:##,###.00}", myValue)

but this fails when you have values like 0.2014 where it gives .21 For this I use

string.Format("{0:#,##0.00}", myValue)
-3

If you want to show it in DataGridview , you should change its type , because default is String and since you change it to decimal it considers as Number with floating point

Dim dt As DataTable = New DataTable
dt.Columns.Add("col1", GetType(Decimal))
dt.Rows.Add(1)
dt.Rows.Add(10)
dt.Rows.Add(2)

DataGridView1.DataSource = dt
-4

The method I used to not worry anymore about cultures and potential formatting issues is that I formatted it as currency and took out the currency symbol afterwards.

if (decimal.TryParse(tblCell, out result))

{
  formattedValue = result.ToString("C").Substring(1);
}
1
  • 9
    This code is not culture independent - it will use whatever default culture is set on the machine running the code. This could create undesired output where that culture places their currency symbols at the end of the number rather than the start (e.g. fr-FR), or uses more than one character to denote the currency (e.g. da-DK), or does not separate thousands using commas (e.g. most of mainland Europe).
    – raveturned
    Jun 13, 2012 at 21:08

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