14

When I was trying to add some input fields with css

I got a problem

I couldn't make more than one css for some input fields

this is the fields I have

<input type="text" name="firstName" />
<input type="text" name="lastName" />

and the css is

input
{
   background-image:url('images/fieldBG.gif');
   background-repeat:repeat-x;
   border: 0px solid;
   height:25px;
   width:235px;
}

I want to make the first field (firstName) with this css

input
{
   background-image:url('images/fieldBG.gif');
   background-repeat:repeat-x;
   border: 0px solid;
   height:25px;
   width:235px;
}

and the second one (lastName) with this css

input
{
   background-image:url('images/fieldBG2222.gif');
   background-repeat:repeat-x;
   border: 0px solid;
   height:25px;
   width:125px;
}

help please :-)

6

Use the ID selector.

CSS:

input{
    background-repeat:repeat-x;
    border: 0px solid;
    height:25px;
    width:125px;
}

#firstname{
    background-image:url('images/fieldBG.gif');
}
#lastname{
    background-image:url('images/fieldBG2222.gif');
}

HTML:

<input type="text" ID="firstname" name="firstName" />    
<input type="text" ID="lastname" name="lastName" />

All your inputs will be styled with the generic input style, and the two special ones will have the styling specified by the ID selector.

  • This works, but it's generally bad practice to style with ID's. The below answer is a much better way to accomplish the task OP is trying to do. – Raults Sep 4 '18 at 19:32
  • I disagree. Applying CSS to an ID instead of a class is exactly for this type of situation -- A one-off. Don't abstract a lone use case! – Chris Cudmore Sep 18 '18 at 16:09
75

You can style by type or name the form elements using CSS.

input[type=text] {
    //styling
}
input[name=html_name] {
    //styling
}
  • In this case html_name is firstName/lastName – Andrew May 14 '12 at 18:55
  • 2
    but you should put quotation marks around the value (not sure if it works without). Like input[type="text] - That's how I have always used it.. – Dion May 14 '12 at 18:57
  • @DRP96 practically right, I just wrote a generic statement (the quotes should be implicitly added). – Andrew May 14 '12 at 19:11
5

You have to change your HTML file:

<input type="text" name="firstName" /> 
<input type="text" name="lastName" />

...to:

<input type="text" id="FName" name="firstName" />
<input type="text" id="LName" name="lastName" />

And modify your CSS file to:

input {
    background-repeat:repeat-x;
    border: 0px solid; 
    height:25px; 
    width:125px;
}


#FName {
    background-image:url('images/fieldBG.gif');
}


#LName {
    background-image:url('images/fieldBG2222.gif');
} 

Best of Luck!

3

Add an 'id' tag to each of your inputs:

<input type="text" id="firstName" name="firstName" />
<input type="text" id="lastName" name="lastName" />

then you can use the #selector in CSS to grab each one.

input {
  background-repeat:repeat-x; 
  border: 0px solid;
  height:25px;
}

#firstName {
  background-image:url('images/fieldBG.gif');
  width:235px;
}

#lastName {
  background-image:url('images/fieldBG2222.gif');
  width:125px;
}
0

Use Classes to style. they are a better solution. using classes you can style each input type individually.

<html>
    <head>
        <style>
            .classnamehere {
                //Styling;
            }
        </style>
    </head>

    <body>
        <input class="classnamehere" type="text" name="firstName" />
    </body>
</html>

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