3

The Path::Class module is a top-rated module and has very good reviews at cpan.org. I wonder whether the Path::Class:Dir module can create directory tree like this*:

/home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25
  -> lib/
     -> Path/
        -> Class/
           -> Dir.pm
           -> Entity.pl
           -> File.pl
        -> Class.pl
  -> t/
     -> 01-basic.t
     -> 02-foreign.t
     -> 03-filesystem.t
     -> 04-subclass.t
     -> 05-traverse.t
     -> author-critic.t
  -> Build.PL
  -> Changes
  -> dist.ini
  -> INSTALL
  -> LICENSE
  -> Makefile.PL
  -> MANIFEST
  -> META.yml
  -> README
  -> SIGNATURE

*) Source: Path-Class-0.25.tar.gz file and "/" at the end of string indicated directory (like ls -p in *nix systems)

And not like this (full path from root):

  /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/lib/
     -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/lib/Path/
        -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/lib/Path/Class/
           -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/lib/Path/Class/Dir.pm
           -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/lib/Path/Class/Entity.pl
           -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/lib/Path/Class/File.pl
        -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/lib/Path/Class.pl
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/t/
     -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/t/01-basic.t
     -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/t/02-foreign.t
     -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/t/03-filesystem.t
     -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/t/04-subclass.t
     -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/t/05-traverse.t
     -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/t/author-critic.t
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/Build.PL
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/Changes
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/dist.ini
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/INSTALL
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/LICENSE
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/Makefile.PL
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/MANIFEST
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/META.yml
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/README
  -> /home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25/SIGNATURE

I tried to do it but there is something wrong with my code:

#------------------8<------------------
my $dir = Path::Class::Dir->new('/home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25');

my $nfiles = $dir->traverse(sub {
    my ($child, $cont) = @_;
    return if -l $child; # don't follow symlinks

    #print Dumper($child);
    #print "$child\n";

    print $child->{'dir'}{'dirs'}[-1];
    print " -> ";
    print $child->{'file'};
    print "\n";
    return $cont->();
});
#------------------8<------------------

Could you please have a gander at my code and tell me how to make a directory tree without full paths in $child?

Many thanks!

Best regards,
Scottie

  • It is wrong to poke around the hash structure of an object. The object's methods provide the only authorised way of accessing and modifying its contents. For instance, $child->{'dir'}{'dirs'}[-1] is simply $child->basename. – Borodin May 15 '12 at 0:54
4

You need to use the basename method of Class::Path::File (which is also available as a method of Class::Path::Dir) to extract just the last element of the path.

You must also use a parameter to the callback to keep track of the current level of indentation.

This program appears to fulfil your requirement.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Path::Class;

my $dir = dir('/home/scottie/perl/lib/Path-Class-0.25');

$dir->traverse(sub {

  my ($child, $cont, $indent) = @_;
  $indent //= 0;

  if ($indent == 0) {
    print $child, "\n";
  }
  else {
    print '   ' x ($indent - 1), '-> ', $child->basename;
    print '/' if $child->is_dir;
    print "\n";
  }

  $cont->($indent + 1);
});
  • Very good - I was coming to write a similar answer myself. =) – Ken Williams May 15 '12 at 1:44

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