3

By word, I mean any whitespace-delimited string.

Suppose the file test.txt has the following words delimited by spaces:

hello hello hello hell osd
hello
hello 
hello
hellojames beroo helloooohellool axnber hello
way
how 

I want to count the number of times the word hello appears in each line.

I used the command awk -F "hello" '{print NF-1}' test.txt to show the number of occurrences of the word hello in each line:

3
1
1
1
4
0
0

So it find a total of 3+1+1+1+4 = 10 occurrences.

The problem is the on fourth line: hello only occurs 1 time as a separate word; words such as hellojames and helloooohellool should not be counted because hello is not delimited by whitespace.

So I want it to find 7 occurrences of hello as a separate word.

Can you help me write a command that returns the correct total of 7 times?

  • Do you need the number of occurrences in each line, or just the total? – Adam Liss May 15 '12 at 1:58
  • I just need a total – user1304473 May 17 '12 at 22:22
6
awk '{ for(i=1; i<=NF; i++) if($i=="hello") c++ } END{ print c }' file.txt

If you need it to print every line:

awk '{ c=1; for(i=0; i<=NF; i++) if($i=="hello") c++; print c }'
  • Actually, the third line, After this "hello", there is a hidden white space behind this hello, so when I counted that, hello[space] nextline, which means this is a hello[space] rather than just one "hello" word it works, thanks – user1304473 May 15 '12 at 1:36
  • Sorry, off-by-one; the fields go 1-NF. Not sure why your third line is off, perhaps you have a funny non-printing character in it. – Kevin May 15 '12 at 1:37
3
grep -o '\<hello\>' filename | wc -l

The \< and \> bits are word boundary patterns, so the expression won't find foohello or hellobar.

You can also use awk -F '\\<hello\\>' ... to achieve the same effect.

2

Solution:

sed 's/\s\+/\n/g' test.txt | grep -w hello  | wc -l

Explanation:

sed 's/\s\+/\n/g' text.txt

This replaces every span of whitespace with a newline, effectively reformatting the file test.txt so it has one word per line. The command sed 's/FIND/REPLACE/g' replaces the FIND pattern with REPLACE everywhere it appears. The pattern \s\+ means "one or more whitespace characters", and \n is a newline.

grep -w hello

This extracts only those lines that contain hello as a complete word.

wc -l

This counts the number of lines.


If you want to count the number of occurrences per line, you can use the same technique, but process one line at a time:

while read line; do
  echo $line | sed 's/\s\+/\n/g' | grep -w hello  | wc -l
done < test.txt
0
for word in `cat test.txt`; do
  if [[ ${word} == hello ]]; then
    helloCount=$(( ${helloCount} + 1));
  fi;
done;

echo ${helloCount} 
  • 1
    UUoC! partmaps.org/era/unix/award.html (Also UUo${} but I haven't found a web site for that yet.) :-) – Adam Liss May 15 '12 at 1:41
  • That won't work. He wants a count per line. This replicates the behavior of grep -c (i.e. it counts per file). – Tim Pote May 15 '12 at 1:42
  • @AdamLiss This isn't a UUoC. Cat is needed for the for-loop to work properly. He is essentially wanting to read the file to stout, which your link explicitly states is a valid use of cat. – Tim Pote May 15 '12 at 1:44
  • 2
    @TimPote What's wrong with for word in $(<test.txt); do ? – Adam Liss May 15 '12 at 1:54
  • @AdamLiss Awww snap! I forgot about that syntax. Touche good sir. Touche. – Tim Pote May 15 '12 at 1:55
0
a=$(printf "\01")
b=hello
sed -e "s/\<$b\>/ $a /g" -e "s/[^$a]//g" -e "s/$a/ $b /g" file | wc -w
0
cat $FileName | tr '[\040]' '[\012]' | grep $word | wc -l

This Command will change space in new line then easily you can grep that word and count number of lines those are containing given word.

0

Only change the "needle" and the "file"

#!/usr/bin/env sh

needle="|"
file="file_example.txt"

IFS=$'\n'

counter=0
for line in `cat $file`
do
    counter=$[$counter+1]
    echo $counter"|"`echo $line | grep -o "$needle" | wc -l`
done

It will print the line number and the number of occurrences, separated by a pipe character

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