57

In JavaScript, how would one write a function that converts a given [edit: positive integer] number (below 100 billion) into a 3-letter abbreviation -- where 0-9 and a-z/A-Z are counting as a letter, but the dot (as it's so tiny in many proportional fonts) would not, and would be ignored in terms of the letter limit?

This question is related to this helpful thread, but it's not the same; for instance, where that function would turn e.g. "123456 -> 1.23k" ("123.5k" being 5 letters) I am looking for something that does "123456 -> 0.1m" ("0[.]1m" being 3 letters). For instance, this would be the output of hoped function (left original, right ideal return value):

0                      "0"
12                    "12"
123                  "123"
1234                "1.2k"
12345                "12k"
123456              "0.1m"
1234567             "1.2m"
12345678             "12m"
123456789           "0.1b"
1234567899          "1.2b"
12345678999          "12b"

Thanks!

Update: Thanks! An answer is in and works per the requirements when the following amendments are made:

function abbreviateNumber(value) {
    var newValue = value;
    if (value >= 1000) {
        var suffixes = ["", "k", "m", "b","t"];
        var suffixNum = Math.floor( (""+value).length/3 );
        var shortValue = '';
        for (var precision = 2; precision >= 1; precision--) {
            shortValue = parseFloat( (suffixNum != 0 ? (value / Math.pow(1000,suffixNum) ) : value).toPrecision(precision));
            var dotLessShortValue = (shortValue + '').replace(/[^a-zA-Z 0-9]+/g,'');
            if (dotLessShortValue.length <= 2) { break; }
        }
        if (shortValue % 1 != 0)  shortValue = shortValue.toFixed(1);
        newValue = shortValue+suffixes[suffixNum];
    }
    return newValue;
}
  • While not JS, I've done the same in C++, which you can view at gist.github.com/1870641 -- the process will be the same. You might be better off looking for off-the-shelf solutions, though. – csl May 15 '12 at 11:44
  • Baz, my current start is just a mildly reformatted function from the linked thread, with mentioned issues. Before I'd try to spice up that function, I was hoping someone else might perhaps already have a smart function written somewhere, or knows how to easily do that. Csl, that's great, thanks a lot! Would that conversion also do the "0.1m" style mentioned? – Philipp Lenssen May 15 '12 at 11:48
  • I have migrated my answer to stackoverflow.com/a/10600491/711085 – ninjagecko May 15 '12 at 12:19
  • 8
    what's shortNum ? you never use is, and it's not even declared.. – vsync Oct 7 '15 at 15:11
  • Also there's a mix between . and ,, so 1001.5 is turned to millions instead of thousands. – vsync Oct 7 '15 at 15:13

13 Answers 13

49

I believe ninjagecko's solution doesn't quite conform with the standard you wanted. The following function does:

function intToString (value) {
    var suffixes = ["", "k", "m", "b","t"];
    var suffixNum = Math.floor((""+value).length/3);
    var shortValue = parseFloat((suffixNum != 0 ? (value / Math.pow(1000,suffixNum)) : value).toPrecision(2));
    if (shortValue % 1 != 0) {
        var shortNum = shortValue.toFixed(1);
    }
    return shortValue+suffixes[suffixNum];
}

For values greater than 99 trillion no letter will be added, which can be easily fixed by appending to the 'suffixes' array.

Edit by Philipp follows: With the following changes it fits with all requirements perfectly!

function abbreviateNumber(value) {
    var newValue = value;
    if (value >= 1000) {
        var suffixes = ["", "k", "m", "b","t"];
        var suffixNum = Math.floor( (""+value).length/3 );
        var shortValue = '';
        for (var precision = 2; precision >= 1; precision--) {
            shortValue = parseFloat( (suffixNum != 0 ? (value / Math.pow(1000,suffixNum) ) : value).toPrecision(precision));
            var dotLessShortValue = (shortValue + '').replace(/[^a-zA-Z 0-9]+/g,'');
            if (dotLessShortValue.length <= 2) { break; }
        }
        if (shortValue % 1 != 0)  shortNum = shortValue.toFixed(1);
        newValue = shortValue+suffixes[suffixNum];
    }
    return newValue;
}
  • Thanks! I made some amendments so it fits 100% with the requirements and edited your answer (I hope that is the correct way to do it in StackOverflow, please change if needed). Superb! – Philipp Lenssen May 15 '12 at 15:49
  • Just out of curiosity: which case/requirement did I miss? – chucktator May 15 '12 at 21:52
  • 1
    Those were minor and quickly amended based on your great answer. The following test numbers were slightly missed: 123 became 0.12k (ideal result: 123, as that's still 3 letters and thus ok); 123456 became 0.12m (ideal: 0.1m, as 0.12m is 4 letters, minus dot); same for 0.12b which with amendments now becomes 0.1b. Thanks again for your help! – Philipp Lenssen May 16 '12 at 10:00
  • 1
    I just made a small adjustment to it (yet to be peer reviewed). I added value = Math.round(value); to the very start of the function. By doing that it doesn't break when "value" has decimal places eg. 10025.26584 will turn into 10k instead of NaN – Daniel Tonon Jul 10 '15 at 0:54
  • 2
    shortNum is not defined in the @PhilippLenssen's edit at the end if (shortValue % 1 != 0) shortNum = shortValue.toFixed(1); – Honza Nov 8 '18 at 16:08
24

This handles very large values as well and is a bit more succinct and efficient.

abbreviate_number = function(num, fixed) {
  if (num === null) { return null; } // terminate early
  if (num === 0) { return '0'; } // terminate early
  fixed = (!fixed || fixed < 0) ? 0 : fixed; // number of decimal places to show
  var b = (num).toPrecision(2).split("e"), // get power
      k = b.length === 1 ? 0 : Math.floor(Math.min(b[1].slice(1), 14) / 3), // floor at decimals, ceiling at trillions
      c = k < 1 ? num.toFixed(0 + fixed) : (num / Math.pow(10, k * 3) ).toFixed(1 + fixed), // divide by power
      d = c < 0 ? c : Math.abs(c), // enforce -0 is 0
      e = d + ['', 'K', 'M', 'B', 'T'][k]; // append power
  return e;
}

Results:

for(var a='', i=0; i < 14; i++){ 
    a += i; 
    console.log(a, abbreviate_number(parseInt(a),0)); 
    console.log(-a, abbreviate_number(parseInt(-a),0)); 
}

0 0
-0 0
01 1
-1 -1
012 12
-12 -12
0123 123
-123 -123
01234 1.2K
-1234 -1.2K
012345 12.3K
-12345 -12.3K
0123456 123.5K
-123456 -123.5K
01234567 1.2M
-1234567 -1.2M
012345678 12.3M
-12345678 -12.3M
0123456789 123.5M
-123456789 -123.5M
012345678910 12.3B
-12345678910 -12.3B
01234567891011 1.2T
-1234567891011 -1.2T
0123456789101112 123.5T
-123456789101112 -123.5T
012345678910111213 12345.7T
-12345678910111212 -12345.7T
  • I like this approach because it handles non-integers much better than the other answers. – Grant H. Oct 25 '16 at 20:14
  • Much better solution – Danillo Corvalan Jan 4 '17 at 13:33
  • Thanks. I just put this into my project and it works like a charm. Awesome solution, very solid. – spieglio Jan 21 '17 at 20:54
11

I think you cant try this numeraljs/

If you want convert 1000 to 1k

console.log(numeral(1000).format('0a'));

and if you want convert 123400 to 123.4k try this

console.log(numeral(123400).format('0.0a'));
  • Fantastic solution if you're willing to install a third-party library – Colby Cox Oct 13 '17 at 16:27
7

Here's what I think is a fairly elegant solution. It does not attempt to deal with negative numbers:

const COUNT_ABBRS = [ '', 'K', 'M', 'G', 'T', 'P', 'E', 'Z', 'Y' ];

function formatCount(count, withAbbr = false, decimals = 2) {
    const i     = 0 === count ? count : Math.floor(Math.log(count) / Math.log(1000));
    let result  = parseFloat((count / Math.pow(1000, i)).toFixed(decimals));
    if(withAbbr) {
        result += `${COUNT_ABBRS[i]}`; 
    }
    return result;
}

Examples:

   formatCount(1000, true);
=> '1k'
   formatCount(100, true);
=> '100'
   formatCount(10000, true);
=> '10k'
   formatCount(10241, true);
=> '10.24k'
   formatCount(10241, true, 0);
=> '10k'
   formatCount(10241, true, 1)
=> '10.2k'
   formatCount(1024111, true, 1)
=> '1M'
   formatCount(1024111, true, 2)
=> '1.02M'
  • 5
    This doesn't solve the question as posed, but it's just what I am looking for. Thanks. – leff Dec 6 '17 at 23:32
  • I like the SI-symbols better than k, m, b. 1b in America/UK is 1e9, but 1e12 in many other countries. – Christiaan Westerbeek Jun 7 '18 at 11:13
6

Based on my answer at https://stackoverflow.com/a/10600491/711085 , your answer is actually slightly shorter to implement, by using .substring(0,3):

function format(n) {
    with (Math) {
        var base = floor(log(abs(n))/log(1000));
        var suffix = 'kmb'[base-1];
        return suffix ? String(n/pow(1000,base)).substring(0,3)+suffix : ''+n;
    }
}

(As usual, don't use Math unless you know exactly what you're doing; assigning var pow=... and the like would cause insane bugs. See link for a safer way to do this.)

> tests = [-1001, -1, 0, 1, 2.5, 999, 1234, 
           1234.5, 1000001, Math.pow(10,9), Math.pow(10,12)]
> tests.forEach(function(x){ console.log(x,format(x)) })

-1001 "-1.k"
-1 "-1"
0 "0"
1 "1"
2.5 "2.5"
999 "999"
1234 "1.2k"
1234.5 "1.2k"
1000001 "1.0m"
1000000000 "1b"
1000000000000 "1000000000000"

You will need to catch the case where the result is >=1 trillion, if your requirement for 3 chars is strict, else you risk creating corrupt data, which would be very bad.

  • worked perfectly! thanks! – Daksh Miglani Oct 27 '17 at 15:53
  • Nice solution. Also mad props for using the deprecated with statement :) – stwilz Jun 14 '18 at 4:23
2

A lot of answers on this thread get rather complicated, using Math objects, map objects, for-loops, etc. But those approaches don't actually improve the design very much - they introduce more lines of code, more complexity, and more memory overhead. After evaluating several approaches, I think the manual approach is the easiest to understand, and provides the highest performance.

const formatCash = n => {
  if (n < 1e3) return n;
  if (n >= 1e3 && n < 1e6) return +(n / 1e3).toFixed(1) + "K";
  if (n >= 1e6 && n < 1e9) return +(n / 1e6).toFixed(1) + "M";
  if (n >= 1e9 && n < 1e12) return +(n / 1e9).toFixed(1) + "B";
  if (n >= 1e12) return +(n / 1e12).toFixed(1) + "T";
};

console.log(formatCash(1235000));

1

After some playing around, this approach seems to meet the required criteria. Takes some inspiration from @chuckator's answer.

function abbreviateNumber(value) {

    if (value <= 1000) {
        return value.toString();
    }

    const numDigits = (""+value).length;
    const suffixIndex = Math.floor(numDigits / 3);

    const normalisedValue = value / Math.pow(1000, suffixIndex);

    let precision = 2;
    if (normalisedValue < 1) {
        precision = 1;
    }

    const suffixes = ["", "k", "m", "b","t"];
    return normalisedValue.toPrecision(precision) + suffixes[suffixIndex];
}
  • I think this answer is great. I had a slightly different case where I didn't want to show values with leading zeros. I added if (adjustedValue.charAt(0) === '0') { return adjustedValue * 1000 + suffixes[suffixIndex - 1]; } else { return adjustedValue + suffixes[suffixIndex]; } – user3162553 Apr 27 '16 at 23:05
1

Intl is the Javascript standard 'package' for implemented internationalized behaviours. Intl.NumberFormatter is specifically the localized number formatter. So this code actually respects your locally configured thousands and decimal separators.

intlFormat(num) {
    return new Intl.NumberFormat().format(Math.round(num*10)/10);
}

abbreviateNumber(value) {
    let num = Math.floor(value);
    if(num >= 1000000000)
        return this.intlFormat(num/1000000000)+'B';
    if(num >= 1000000)
        return this.intlFormat(num/1000000)+'M';
    if(num >= 1000)
        return this.intlFormat(num/1000)+'k';
    return this.intlFormat(num);
}

abbreviateNumber(999999999999) // Gives 999B

Related question: Abbreviate a localized number in JavaScript for thousands (1k) and millions (1m)

  • But then the suffixes aren't localized. – glen-84 May 21 '18 at 11:08
1

Code

const SI_PREFIXES = [
  { value: 1, symbol: '' },
  { value: 1e3, symbol: 'k' },
  { value: 1e6, symbol: 'M' },
  { value: 1e9, symbol: 'G' },
  { value: 1e12, symbol: 'T' },
  { value: 1e15, symbol: 'P' },
  { value: 1e18, symbol: 'E' },
]

const abbreviateNumber = (number) => {
  if (number === 0) return number

  const tier = SI_PREFIXES.filter((n) => number >= n.value).pop()
  const numberFixed = (number / tier.value).toFixed(1)

  return `${numberFixed}${tier.symbol}`
}

abbreviateNumber(2000) // "2.0k"
abbreviateNumber(2500) // "2.5k"
abbreviateNumber(255555555) // "255.6M"

Test:

import abbreviateNumber from './abbreviate-number'

test('abbreviateNumber', () => {
  expect(abbreviateNumber(0)).toBe('0')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(100)).toBe('100')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(999)).toBe('999')

  expect(abbreviateNumber(1000)).toBe('1.0k')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(100000)).toBe('100.0k')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(1000000)).toBe('1.0M')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(1e6)).toBe('1.0M')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(1e10)).toBe('10.0G')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(1e13)).toBe('10.0T')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(1e16)).toBe('10.0P')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(1e19)).toBe('10.0E')

  expect(abbreviateNumber(1500)).toBe('1.5k')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(1555)).toBe('1.6k')

  expect(abbreviateNumber(undefined)).toBe('0')
  expect(abbreviateNumber(null)).toBe(null)
  expect(abbreviateNumber('100')).toBe('100')
  expect(abbreviateNumber('1000')).toBe('1.0k')
})
  • After trying every solution above in this thread, this is the only one that works correctly. Thanks Danilo! – ty. Apr 21 at 18:17
1

I'm using this function to get these values.

function Converter(number, fraction) {
    let ranges = [
      { divider: 1, suffix: '' },
      { divider: 1e3, suffix: 'K' },
      { divider: 1e6, suffix: 'M' },
      { divider: 1e9, suffix: 'G' },
      { divider: 1e12, suffix: 'T' },
      { divider: 1e15, suffix: 'P' },
      { divider: 1e18, suffix: 'E' },
    ]
    //find index based on number of zeros
    let index = (Math.abs(number).toString().length / 3).toFixed(0)
    return (number / ranges[index].divider).toFixed(fraction) + ranges[index].suffix
}

Each 3 digits has different suffix, that's what i'm trying to find firstly.

So, remove negative symbol if exists, then find how many 3 digits in this number.

after that find appropriate suffix based on previous calculation added to divided number.

Converter(1500, 1)

Will return:

1.5K
  • there's something wrong. Converter(824492, 1) will return 0.8M. It should return 824k – Sebastian SALAMANCA May 2 at 23:36
0

I found better solution on SO here with fiddle running examples as @chucktator solution returns NaN in many cases. It worked perfectly fine for me.

0
            function converse_number (labelValue) {

                    // Nine Zeroes for Billions
                    return Math.abs(Number(labelValue)) >= 1.0e+9

                    ? Math.abs(Number(labelValue)) / 1.0e+9 + "B"
                    // Six Zeroes for Millions 
                    : Math.abs(Number(labelValue)) >= 1.0e+6

                    ? Math.abs(Number(labelValue)) / 1.0e+6 + "M"
                    // Three Zeroes for Thousands
                    : Math.abs(Number(labelValue)) >= 1.0e+3

                    ? Math.abs(Number(labelValue)) / 1.0e+3 + "K"

                    : Math.abs(Number(labelValue));

                }

alert(converse_number(100000000000));

0

@nimesaram

Your solution will not be desirable for the following case:

Input 50000
Output 50.0k

Following solution will work fine.

const convertNumberToShortString = (
  number: number,
  fraction: number
) => {
  let newValue: string = number.toString();
  if (number >= 1000) {
    const ranges = [
      { divider: 1, suffix: '' },
      { divider: 1e3, suffix: 'k' },
      { divider: 1e6, suffix: 'm' },
      { divider: 1e9, suffix: 'b' },
      { divider: 1e12, suffix: 't' },
      { divider: 1e15, suffix: 'p' },
      { divider: 1e18, suffix: 'e' }
    ];
    //find index based on number of zeros
    const index = Math.floor(Math.abs(number).toString().length / 3);
    let numString = (number / ranges[index].divider).toFixed(fraction);
    numString =
      parseInt(numString.substring(numString.indexOf('.') + 1)) === 0
        ? Math.floor(number / ranges[index].divider).toString()
        : numString;
    newValue = numString + ranges[index].suffix;
  }
  return newValue;
};

// Input 50000
// Output 50k
// Input 4500
// Output 4.5k

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