26

A common condition that all programs should do is to check if variables are assigned or not.

Take the below statements:

(1)

if Assigned(Ptr) then
begin
  // do something
end;

(2)

if Ptr <> nil then
begin
  // do something
end;

What is the difference between Assigned(Ptr) and Ptr <> nil?

3

2 Answers 2

39

It's usually the same... except when you check a function...

function mfi: TObject;
begin
  Result := nil;
end;

procedure TForm1.btn1Click(Sender: TObject);
type
  TMyFunction = function: TObject of object;
var
  f: TMyFunction;
begin
  f := mfi;

  if Assigned(f) then
  begin
    ShowMessage('yes'); // TRUE
  end
  else
  begin
    ShowMessage('no');
  end;

  if f <> nil then
  begin
    ShowMessage('yes');
  end
  else
  begin
    ShowMessage('no');  // FALSE
  end;
end;

With the second syntax, it will check the result of the function, not the function itself...

5

As far as performance, there is no difference. I personally prefer the second form as I find that humans can parse the meaning quicker.

4
  • 13
    Very odd human that finds <>nil easier to read than assigned. I personally prefer the exact opposite for the exact same reason. In other words I think option 1 is easier to parse. May 15, 2012 at 14:20
  • I would also say if Assigned to be more human readable rather than <> operands.
    – user1175743
    May 15, 2012 at 14:41
  • 4
    I think the reason is that at first glance Assigned can be any old function call. May 15, 2012 at 15:45
  • 1
    I also prefer Assigned. Easier to read and "safer". It always behaves the same, unlike this example with "F: TMyFunction". What really bugs me is working in a code base where both are used. For someone who doesn't know better, it leads to the very question the OP asked. "What is the difference, and why is one here but another there?" Aug 9, 2016 at 15:56

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