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I wish to output large numbers with thousand-separators (commas or spaces) — basically the same as in How to display numeric in 3 digit grouping but using printf in C (GNU, 99).

If printf does not support digit grouping natively, how can I achieve this with something like printf("%s", group_digits(number))?

It must support negative integers and preferably floats, too.

4

7 Answers 7

12

If you can use POSIX printf, try

#include <locale.h>
setlocale(LC_ALL, ""); /* use user selected locale */
printf("%'d", 1000000);
2
  • 1
    Not even something like "de_DE". Basically if you want the program to run anywhere, it has to be "", meaning whatever the user has selected. You can also limit yourself to LC_NUMERIC locale category.
    – Jan Hudec
    May 15, 2012 at 14:27
  • 1
    I don't really like this method because it doesn't seem to port to other languages. Take Python, for example, I tried print "%'d" % 1000 and it immediately threw an error. ' seems to be a non-standard format specifier. For that reason, this answer should be taken with a grain of salt if one programs in more languages than just C, and more environments than just the POSIX-compliant ones. Considering the narrow scope of the question, though, I'll give an upvote. May 31, 2016 at 16:43
3

Here is a compact way of doing it:

// format 1234567.89 -> 1 234 567.89
extern char *strmoney(double value){
    static char result[64];
    char *result_p = result;
    char separator = ' ';
    size_t tail;

    snprintf(result, sizeof(result), "%.2f", value);

    while(*result_p != 0 && *result_p != '.')
        result_p++;

    tail = result + sizeof(result) - result_p;

    while(result_p - result > 3){
        result_p -= 3;
        memmove(result_p + 1, result_p, tail);
        *result_p = separator;
        tail += 4;
    }

    return result;
}

For example, a call to strmoney(1234567891.4568) returns the string "1 234 567 891.46". You can easily replace the space with another separator (such as a comma) by changing the separator variable at the top of the function.

5
  • 1
    Thanks, Erick; that's brilliant use of a static to avoid having to declare a separate buffer, though one must be careful to avoid constructs like printf("%s|%s\n", strmoney(1234567890.1234567890), strmoney(-9876543210.9876543210)) which print the same value twice. +1 for using memmove too. Hope you don't mind my beautifying and annotating your code!
    – Gnubie
    Dec 9, 2013 at 20:26
  • @Gnubie I don't wanna be that guy, but comments are bad. They represent a failure to clearly write code. If you have to explain how something works, then it needs to be re-written, not explained. Clever code is error-prone, and comments used to describe said clever code both create more work for a maintainer, and represent a lie waiting to happen. May 31, 2016 at 15:14
  • 1
    I took the liberty of refactoring the function and tidying up the language. Honestly, though, this function needs more than just a refactor. For example, returning a static char array is problematic because any pointer you have to the returned value will change every time the function runs, making it impossible to use this function in parallel with itself. A simpler way would be to pass in a buffer from the caller, rather than create it in the callee, and change the return type to void. That's one example of something that could be improved. May 31, 2016 at 16:30
  • Rather than magic number 64, use a value to handle all double. Perhaps : result[DBL_MAX_10_EXP*4/3 + 7]; Apr 19 at 19:43
  • strmoney(-123.45) --> "- 123.45". "-123.45" expected. Apr 20 at 23:15
2

A secure way to format thousand separators, with support for negative numbers:

Because VS < 2015 doesn't implement snprintf, you need to do this

#if defined(_WIN32)
    #define snprintf(buf,len, format,...) _snprintf_s(buf, len,len, format, __VA_ARGS__)
#endif

And then

char* format_commas(int n, char *out)
{
    int c;
    char buf[100];
    char *p;
    char* q = out; // Backup pointer for return...

    if (n < 0)
    {
        *out++ = '-';
        n = abs(n);
    }


    snprintf(buf, 100, "%d", n);
    c = 2 - strlen(buf) % 3;

    for (p = buf; *p != 0; p++) {
        *out++ = *p;
        if (c == 1) {
            *out++ = '\'';
        }
        c = (c + 1) % 3;
    }
    *--out = 0;

    return q;
}

Example usage:

size_t currentSize = getCurrentRSS();
size_t peakSize = getPeakRSS();


printf("Current size: %d\n", currentSize);
printf("Peak size: %d\n\n\n", peakSize);

char* szcurrentSize = (char*)malloc(100 * sizeof(char));
char* szpeakSize = (char*)malloc(100 * sizeof(char));

printf("Current size (f): %s\n", format_commas((int)currentSize, szcurrentSize));
printf("Peak size (f): %s\n", format_commas((int)currentSize, szpeakSize));

free(szcurrentSize);
free(szpeakSize);
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  • Fails for format_commas(INT_MIN, buf)); Sample: "--2'147'483'648". abs(INT_MIN) is undefined behavior. Apr 19 at 19:48
  • Rather than strlen(buf), code could use the return value of snprintf(). Apr 19 at 19:50
2

My own version for unsigned int64:

char* toString_DigitGrouping( unsigned __int64 val )
{
    static char result[ 128 ];
    _snprintf(result, sizeof(result), "%lld", val);

    size_t i = strlen(result) - 1;
    size_t i2 = i + (i / 3);
    int c = 0;
    result[i2 + 1] = 0;

    for( ; i != 0; i-- )
    {
        result[i2--] = result[i];
        c++;
        if( c % 3 == 0 )
            result[i2--] = '\'';
    } //for

    return result;  
} //toString_DigitGrouping
1
  • "%lld" is not the same sign-ness as unsigned __int64. I recommend to use a match format specifier and type. Apr 19 at 20:01
2
#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    char str[50];
    int len = 0;   
    scanf("%48[^\n]%n", str, &len);

    int start = len % 3;

    for(int i = 0; i < len; i++) {        
        if(i == start && i != 0) {
            printf(" ");
        } else if((i - start) % 3 == 0 && i != 0) {
            printf(" ");
        }    
        printf("%c", str[i]);
    }   

   return 0;
}
3
2
#include <stdio.h>

void punt(int n){
    char s[28];
    int i = 27;
    if(n<0){n=-n; putchar('-');} 
    do{
        s[i--] = n%10 + '0';
        if(!(i%4) && n>9)s[i--]=' ';
        n /= 10;
    }while(n);
    puts(&s[++i]);
}


int main(){

    int a;
    scanf("%d",&a);
    punt(a);

}
1
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

char *commify(char *numstr){
    char *wk, *wks, *p, *ret=numstr;
    int i;

    wks=wk=strrev(strdup(numstr));
    p = strchr(wk, '.');
    if(p){//include '.' 
        while(wk != p)//skip until '.'
            *numstr++ = *wk++;
        *numstr++=*wk++;
    }
    for(i=1;*wk;++i){
        if(isdigit(*wk)){
            *numstr++=*wk++;
            if(isdigit(*wk) && i % 3 == 0)
                *numstr++ = ',';
        } else {
            break;
        }
    }
    while(*numstr++=*wk++);

    free(wks); 
    return strrev(ret);
}


int main(){
    char buff[64];//To provide a sufficient size after conversion.
    sprintf(buff, "%d", 100);
    printf("%s\n", commify(buff));
    sprintf(buff, "%d", 123456);
    printf("%s\n", commify(buff));
    sprintf(buff, "%.2f", 1234.56f);
    printf("%s\n", commify(buff));
    sprintf(buff, "%d", -123456);
    printf("%s\n", commify(buff));
    sprintf(buff, "%.2lf", -12345678.99);
    printf("%s\n", commify(buff));
    return 0;
}

ADD:

/*
char *strrev(char *str){
    char c,*front,*back;

    for(front=str,back=str+strlen(str)-1;front < back;front++,back--){
        c=*front;*front=*back;*back=c;
    }
    return(str);
}
*/
2
  • implementation of the printf option is not supported in many compilers, no choice but to implement it yourself.
    – BLUEPIXY
    May 15, 2012 at 22:37
  • strrev is unavailable on some compilers but can be implemented as in the answer to stackoverflow.com/questions/8534274/… . With it, the code gave me the correct answers, so I've nullified someone's downvote. Thanks, BLUEPIXY.
    – Gnubie
    May 17, 2012 at 14:56

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