13

I am layman to unix and sofar I using R in windows. For example I type following in my R session (in R gui).

# this is a my funny example script 
X <- 1:10
Y <- 21:30
plot(X, Y)
myfun <- function (x){
              x1 <- x^0.2
              return (x1)
             }
myfun(X)

How can I achieve this in unix shell, in two situations -

(1) directly in command line via an interpeter (2) creating a script and running script.

Please provide step considering I am layman to unix.

  • 1
    Maybe you should use R for linux? – Burton Samograd May 15 '12 at 14:32
  • Sorry for the simple question, what is the difference between linux and unix R ? I believe we can run R in unix – SHRram May 15 '12 at 14:35
  • 1
    What have you tried? R should install nicely on unix or linux, and you can access it through the command line with R. You can also look at some of the excellent guis available (I would suggest RStudio as an excellent starting point). Finally, running a script can be done easily. Often you use R CMD BATCH script.R but there are many alternatives and options that are well documented. – Justin May 15 '12 at 14:45
  • 2
    I suggest you go through the R documentation. There you have good instructions for installation and e.g. scripting. – Maehler May 15 '12 at 14:46
25

Assuming you save your script in a simple text file with the name so.R, you can run it under Linux/Unix by typing R at the prompt. Once in R enter

  source('so.R')

to execute the script inside the R environment (this assumes the so.R file is in the same directory as you are when you issue this command).

To run the script from the Linux/Unix command line use the following command:

  R CMD BATCH so.R

Note that I got the plot to show when I ran the script inside of R, but from the Linux command line it doesn't show. I suspect it gets quickly displayed and then goes away, so there will be a R command that you have to look up to make it pause after it displays the plot.

  • 4
    You may want to consider actual scripting fronted Rscript (comes with R) or our older r (from our package littler). The use of R CMD BATCH is deprecated in favor of Rscript. If you have it, r is nice too. – Dirk Eddelbuettel Sep 30 '13 at 18:42
1

If your program is going to work on a single dataset, then simple-r might be the solution:

http://code.google.com/p/simple-r/

It is especially designed for simple statistical analysis as a part of Linux command line. For example, if one wants to plot some data, 'r -p data.txt' will do the job; for getting correlation coefficient: 'r cor data.txt' will suffice.

  • We actually hogged /usr/bin/r a few years earlier for our littler project which is is a tad more generic. – Dirk Eddelbuettel Oct 2 '13 at 14:41
1

I'm guessing from the way you worded your question that you maybe SSH'ed into a linux machine? Or that you installed Ubuntu, for example, on your usual laptop/PC.

Assuming it's the second case: open a terminal and type sudo apt-get install r-base. Then type R. Then type

X <- 1:10
Y <- 21:30
plot(X, Y)
myfun <- function (x){
              x1 <- x^0.2
              return (x1)
             }
myfun(X)

Since your question is about unix versus linux rather than R, you might also try http://unix.stackexchange.com. There is a lot to be said about the differences between linux and unix, but all you probably need to know is: download Ubuntu, burn it onto a disc, then restart your computer with the disc in your CD drive.

Hope this helps.

  • It is lowercase R: sudo apt-get install r-base as all package names are lowercase. – Dirk Eddelbuettel Sep 30 '13 at 18:40
  • Thanks @DirkEddelbuettel. Fixed. – isomorphismes Oct 2 '13 at 14:29
1

The examples below show two ways to run R code in a shell script. Both examples will also define functions without executing them, if the scripts are loaded to an interactive R session via the source() function.

The first example allows you to give arguments as you would to any other shell script, but will not pass additional R-options to R (because Rscript gives "--args" to R as one of the arguments).

The second example allows you to give additional R-options, but generates (harmless) warning messages unless you give "--args" as one of the script arguments. This version is best avoided unless you have special requirements.

prototype-Rscript.r

#!/usr/bin/env Rscript
# Prototype R script for use at command line in Linux, Mac OS X, UNIX

# References:
#   Manual "A Introduction to R", available via help.start() from the R Console
#   Appendix "B.1 Invoking R from the command line" in "A Inroduction to R",

showArguments <- function(argv)  {
    print(argv)
    0
}

if ( ! interactive() )  {
    # set some error return codes
    SCRIPT_ERROR <- 10                      # see documentation for quit()
    SCRIPT_ARG_ERROR <- SCRIPT_ERROR + 1

    # Define ARGV as script path concatenated to script arguments
    ARGV <- commandArgs(FALSE)          # start with all the arguments given to R
    scriptPath <- sub("^--file=", "", grep("^--file=", ARGV, value=TRUE)) [[1]]
    ARGV <- c(scriptPath, commandArgs(TRUE))

    if (length(ARGV) < 2)   {
        cat(file=stderr(), sep="",
            "Usage: ", ARGV[[1]], " [ options ] item ...\n",
            "       Do something with item\n",
            "       See script for details\n")
        quit(save="no", status=SCRIPT_ARG_ERROR)
    }
    quit(save="no", status=showArguments(ARGV))
}

prototype-shellscript.r

#!/usr/bin/env R --slave --vanilla --quiet -f
# Prototype R script for use at command line in Linux, Mac OS X, UNIX

# References:
#   Manual "A Introduction to R", available via help.start() from the R Console
#   Appendix "B.1 Invoking R from the command line" in "A Inroduction to R",

showArguments <- function(argv)  {
    print(argv)
    0
}

if ( ! interactive() )  {
    # set some error return codes
    SCRIPT_ERROR <- 10                      # see documentation for quit()
    SCRIPT_ARG_ERROR <- SCRIPT_ERROR + 1

    # Define ARGV as the arguments given to this script (after argument “-f”)
    ARGV <- commandArgs(FALSE)          # start with all the arguments given to R
    ARGV <- ARGV[(grep("-f", ARGV) [[1]] + 1):length(ARGV)]
    if ( any(grepl("--args", ARGV) ))   {   # remove arguments intended only for R
        ARGV <- c(ARGV[[1]], commandArgs(TRUE))
    }

    if (length(ARGV) < 2)   {
        cat(file=stderr(), sep="",
            "Usage: ", ARGV[[1]], " [ R_options ] --args [ options ] item ...\n",
            "       Do something with item\n",
            "       See script for details\n")
        quit(save="no", status=SCRIPT_ARG_ERROR)
    }
    quit(save="no", status=showArguments(ARGV))
}

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