I understand that @Component annotation was introduced in spring 2.5 in order to get rid of xml bean definition by using classpath scanning.

@Bean was introduced in spring 3.0 and can be used with @Configuration in order to fully get rid of xml file and use java config instead.

Would it have been possible to re-use the @Component annotation instead of introducing @Bean annotation? My understanding is that the final goal is to create beans in both cases.

@Component and @Bean do two quite different things, and shouldn't be confused.

@Component (and @Service and @Repository) are used to auto-detect and auto-configure beans using classpath scanning. There's an implicit one-to-one mapping between the annotated class and the bean (i.e. one bean per class). Control of wiring is quite limited with this approach, since it's purely declarative.

@Bean is used to explicitly declare a single bean, rather than letting Spring do it automatically as above. It decouples the declaration of the bean from the class definition, and lets you create and configure beans exactly how you choose.

To answer your question...

would it have been possible to re-use the @Component annotation instead of introducing @Bean annotation?

Sure, probably; but they chose not to, since the two are quite different. Spring's already confusing enough without muddying the waters further.

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    So I can only use @Component when autowired is needed? It seems @Bean can not affect @Autowired – Jaskey Nov 18 '15 at 12:00
  • 1
    use '@component' for service based classes, '@Bean' as factory more tailor made objects, e.g jdbc datasource – Junchen Liu Jan 7 '16 at 17:35
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    @Jaskey you can use @Autowired with @Bean if you have annotated your bean class with @Configuration – starcorn Mar 4 '16 at 9:53
  • @madhairsilence i agree – PowerFlower May 1 '17 at 15:17
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    Sorry but I can't understand a word of your explanation. You clearly understand this so please would you write a clear explanation or point to the appropriate documentation? – Alex Worden Oct 7 '17 at 16:39

@Component Preferable for component scanning and automatic wiring.

When should you use @Bean?

Sometimes automatic configuration is not an option. When? Let's imagine that you want to wire components from 3rd-party libraries (you don't have the source code so you can't annotate its classes with @Component), so automatic configuration is not possible.

The @Bean annotation returns an object that spring should register as bean in application context. The body of the method bears the logic responsible for creating the instance.

  • 20
    This answer makes more sense for me. I am new to Spring framework. – chandramohan Jun 2 '17 at 10:12
  • your explanation is clear. thank you – Nam Pham Dec 6 '17 at 8:03
  • This one Makes sense – Alok Mishra Dec 7 '17 at 13:17
  • This answer more incisive. Thank you – Lakshman Miani Apr 16 at 2:08
  • Your explanation is very clear for @Bean. Thank you – Srikanth Shanigaram May 21 at 6:06

Let's consider I want specific implementation depending on some dynamic state. @Bean is perfect for that case.

@Bean
@Scope("prototype")
public SomeService someService() {
    switch (state) {
    case 1:
        return new Impl1();
    case 2:
        return new Impl2();
    case 3:
        return new Impl3();
    default:
        return new Impl();
    }
}

However there is no way to do that with @Component.

  • Simple, clear, and incisive. I prefer this answer. – wiseOne Jan 9 '17 at 14:29
  • How you you call that example class? – PowerFlower May 1 '17 at 16:11
  • Perfect example – HopeKing Jul 29 '17 at 14:08

Both approaches aim to register target type in Spring container.

The difference is that @Bean is applicable to methods, whereas @Component is applicable to types.

Therefore when you use @Bean annotation you control instance creation logic in method's body (see example above). With @Component annotation you cannot.

  • 1
    For better understanding of target type for @Bean and @Component refer there source code --> @Target's value – Bharat Oct 10 '17 at 9:17

When you use the @Component tag, it's the same as having a POJO (Plain Old Java Object) with a vanilla bean declaration method (annotated with @Bean). For example, the following method 1 and 2 will give the same result.

Method 1

@Component
public class SomeClass {

    private int number;

    public SomeClass(Integer theNumber){
        this.number = theNumber.intValue();
    }

    public int getNumber(){
        return this.number;
    }
}

with a bean for 'theNumber':

@Bean
Integer theNumber(){
    return new Integer(3456);
}

Method 2

//Note: no @Component tag
public class SomeClass {

    private int number;

    public SomeClass(Integer theNumber){
        this.number = theNumber.intValue();
    }

    public int getNumber(){
        return this.number;
    }
}

with the beans for both:

@Bean
Integer theNumber(){
    return new Integer(3456);
}

@Bean
SomeClass someClass(Integer theNumber){
    return new SomeClass(theNumber);
}

Method 2 allows you to keep bean declarations together, it's a bit more flexible etc. You may even want to add another non-vanilla SomeClass bean like the following:

@Bean
SomeClass strawberryClass(){
    return new SomeClass(new Integer(1));
}
  1. @Component auto detects and configure the beans using classpath scanning where as @Bean explicitly declares a single bean, rather than letting Spring do it automatically.
  2. @Component does not decouples the declaration of the bean from the class definition where as @Bean decouples the declaration of the bean from the class definition.
  3. @Component is a class level annotation where as @Bean is a method level annotation and name of the method serves as the bean name.
  4. @Component need not to be used with the @Configuration annotation where as @Bean annotation has to be used within the class which is annotated with @Configuration.
  5. We cannot create a bean of a class using @Component, if the class is outside spring container where as we can create a bean of a class using @Bean even if the class is present outside the spring container.
  6. @Component has different specializations like @Controller,@Repository and @Service where as @Bean has no specializations.
  • @component and its specializations(@Controller, @service, @repository) allow for auto-detection using classpath scanning. If we see component class like @Controller, @service, @repository will be scan automatically by the spring framework using the component scan.
  • @Bean on the other hand can only be used to explicitly declare a single bean in a configuration class.
  • @Bean used to explicitly declare a single bean, rather than letting spring do it automatically. Its make septate declaration of bean from the class definition.
  • In short @Controller, @service, @repository are for auto-detection and @Bean to create seprate bean from class
    - @Controller
    public class LoginController 
    { --code-- }

    - @Configuration
    public class AppConfig {
    @Bean
    public SessionFactory sessionFactory() 
    {--code-- }

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