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I have a big Directory ~/.vim and in it I have a subdirectory with many other git repos in it. I want to make a git repo of my ~/.vim directory though, but don't want to go through each of my other git subdirectories.

Is there any way of just recursively going through and adding all submodules?

  • 1
    You want make your .vim folder a git repo and add all your subdirectories (which are git repos) as submodules? Is that right ? – Fatih Arslan May 15 '12 at 18:19
  • yeah, i've got ~/.vim/bundle/matchit for example which is cloned straight from github – mazlix May 15 '12 at 18:41
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Suppose that .vim is already a valid git repo and your want to add all git repos to your main git repo, then the for loop below is probably what you need:

First, cd to the root of your git repository.

Paste-able preview command- echo only, won't make any changes:

for x in $(find . -type d) ; do if [ -d "${x}/.git" ] ; then cd "${x}" ; origin="$(git config --get remote.origin.url)" ; cd - 1>/dev/null; echo git submodule add "${origin}" "${x}" ; fi ; done

Paste-able command to add the submodules:

for x in $(find . -type d) ; do if [ -d "${x}/.git" ] ; then cd "${x}" ; origin="$(git config --get remote.origin.url)" ; cd - 1>/dev/null; git submodule add "${origin}" "${x}" ; fi ; done

This loop first finds directories only, looks for a .git directory, identifies the original URL and then adds the submodule.

Readable version:

for x in $(find . -type d) ; do
    if [ -d "${x}/.git" ] ; then
        cd "${x}"
        origin="$(git config --get remote.origin.url)"
        cd - 1>/dev/null
        git submodule add "${origin}" "${x}"
    fi
done
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    The following is what worked for me: for i in $(ls -d bundle/*); do;if [ -d "$i"/.git ]; then; git submodule add $(cd $i && git remote show origin | grep Fetch | awk '{print $3}') ./$i; fi; done – NeonNinja Aug 16 '13 at 7:27
  • Change the initial for loop's find command to for x in $(find . -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -type d), the -mindepth is needed to skip the current top level directory (the '.'), while maxdepth doesn't allow find to go deeper in dir structure. You might want to skip the -maxdepth if you have deeply nested repos. – Dmitry Avtonomov Nov 26 '18 at 1:17
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cd /to/super/repo
root_path=$(pwd)
for submodule in $(find -mindepth 2 -type d -name .git); do
    submodule_dir=$root_path/$submodule/..
    remote_name=$(cd $submodule_dir && git rev-parse --abbrev-ref --symbolic-full-name @{u}|cut -d'/' -f1 )
    remote_uri=$(cd $submodule_dir && git remote get-url $remote_name)

    echo "Adding $submodule with remote $remote_name..."

    # If already added to index, but not to .gitmodules...
    git rm --cached $submodule_dir &> /dev/null

    git submodule add $remote_uri $submodule_dir
done
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I had git repos nested in deeper sub-directories, so to find and add them from any level of depth, I had to use: for i in $(find ~/Sources/* -type d -name .git) do cd $i && cd .. && git submodule add $(pwd) done

| improve this answer | |
  • I doubt that this does something useful. This adds the submodules with a local path as remote, but with a http or ssh URI. – lumbric Dec 14 '17 at 23:59

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