61

You have the asynchronous versions of read and write (begin/end functions), but not of delete (that I can tell). Is there any reason for this? Isn't there as much reason to do delete asynchronously as read/write?

Using threading to simulate asynchronous behavior is not the same as asynchronous functions. Big difference, sure you get the perceived parallel processing, but it's not really preventing blocking, that other thread is still blocked waiting for the file i/o to complete. The real asynchronous functions (begin/end functions) operate at a system level, they queue up file i/o, let the application proceed, and let the application know when it is ready to proceed with the file i/o (allowing you to do other things while you wait for the file i/o to come available).

7
  • 1
    Maybe there is no need? How long does it take to ask the OS to delete a file anyways?
    – Chris O
    May 15, 2012 at 18:29
  • 1
    Why do you need to delete asynchronous? You could do it in a background worker.
    – paparazzo
    May 15, 2012 at 19:15
  • 1
    @aepheus Then use a thread pool if you are worried about too many threads. May 15, 2012 at 23:29
  • 2
    Could ask the same for copy, move, and many other file operations. My guess is Microsoft picked the two top priorities and those would be my pick also. This a question for Microsoft not SO.
    – paparazzo
    May 16, 2012 at 16:17
  • 3
    @ChrisO A very, very, very long time. Seriously. Always assume that IO is slow. How does the code work on, say, a filesystem that's network mounted over a 128kbps line? Mar 1, 2017 at 17:36

6 Answers 6

47

This would be useful. DeleteFile could take up to 30s if deleting on a disconnected network share.

The reason is likely to be that there is no native function to delete a file asynchronously. The managed APIs generally are wrappers around the unmanaged ones.


Now why is there no native asynchronous file delete API? Native async deletion is hard to implement on Windows as it is. DeleteFile does in pseudocode CreateFile plus NtSetInformationFile(Disposition, Delete) plus CloseHandle. There is no async CreateFile (in my opinion a design bug in Windows). NtSetInformationFile just sets a flag on the file data structure in the kernel. It can't be asynchronous. The actual deletion happens when the last handle is closed. I think this might make CloseHandle blocking which is another design issue in Windows. There is no async CloseHandle.

4
  • But the question is: Why isn't there a native function for this?
    – Legends
    Oct 10, 2019 at 17:04
  • @Legends this question is why does .NET not have it. Native async deletion is hard to implement on Windows as it is. DeleteFile does in pseudocode CreateFile plus NtSetInformationFile(Disposition, Delete) plus CloseHandle. There is no async CreateFile (in my opinion a design bug in Windows). NtSetInformationFile just sets a flag on the file data structure in the kernel. It can't be asynchronous. The actual deletion happens when the last handle is closed. I think this might make CloseFile blocking which is another design issue in Windows. There is no async CloseHandle.
    – usr
    Oct 10, 2019 at 17:08
  • Hm,ok. But how can node.js installed on windows delete files in async fashion? Node uses fs.unlink to remove files asynchronously, see here. Or would this be like using Task.Run in C#..?
    – Legends
    Oct 10, 2019 at 19:38
  • 2
    @Legends yes, that's just a thread pool wrapper. It's fake async. The JavaScript language does not support threading so they have to do something like this. Other libraries do things like that, too. I think libuv makes all file system IO fake async even when true async is supported by the platform. I could be wrong about this.
    – usr
    Oct 11, 2019 at 7:56
17

The File class doesn't expose an asynchronous file deletion method; however, through the use of the FileStream class, an asynchronous file deletion can still be performed by taking advantage of a specific one of the 13 constructor overloads provided. The following code will delete a file asynchronously:

using (new FileStream(Path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None, 1, FileOptions.DeleteOnClose | FileOptions.Asynchronous)) ;

I haven't tested it very much, so you may have to modify the usage slightly. (You may want to change FileShare.None to something else if file access by other threads should not be blocked during deletion.) Also, since this code doesn't return any derivation of Task, it would probably be valid to run it with the Task.Run method. Basically, it performs a file deletion which is actually asynchronous on the I/O level, so offloading it onto a thread pool should be okay in this case.

1
  • 1
    Inside the using block you can await stream.FlushAsync() in order to force the deletion and allow the creation of an async method
    – Phate01
    Mar 22, 2020 at 17:32
15

How about this:

public static class FileExtensions {
   public static Task DeleteAsync(this FileInfo fi) {
      return Task.Factory.StartNew(() => fi.Delete() );
   }
}

Then you can just do:

FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(fileName);
await fi.DeleteAsync(); // C# 5
fi.DeleteAsync().Wait(); // C# 4
14
  • 35
    Again just a nice wrapper around threading, not real asynchronous file i/o.
    – aepheus
    May 15, 2012 at 20:27
  • 39
    The main reason to go async is to not block threads (for example in a web-server serving 1000 concurrent requests). This is no help.
    – usr
    May 17, 2012 at 15:45
  • 5
    @usr Delegating the file deletion operation to an async task will be async in the sense that the response can be sent to the client even though the file deletion operation hasn't yet completed. This is async even if the operation is blocking a thread pool thread. I agree that it would be better if this operation was async in the kernel just like a socket or file read is, but it's async in either case. Jul 29, 2014 at 20:04
  • 10
    @usr Your original comment reads "this is no help." It is very helpful, because it implements the most optimal implementation of an asynchronous file delete given the features offered by the kernel. Sure, kernel-space async delete would be even much, much better than that, but it doesn't (yet) exist. Jul 29, 2014 at 21:16
  • 7
    By that logic you can make any operation asynchronous by pushing it to a different thread and that is true. This is not specific to file deletion. There is no need to ask a question about it. In fact the OP has stated he is after true async IO (which must be handled in the kernel).
    – usr
    Feb 25, 2016 at 12:37
9

If nothing else has the file open, opening a FileStream with FileOptions.DeleteOnClose will cause Windows delete the file when the stream is closed. This may help you if you're already opening a FileStream to do async reading/writing, though if you need to wait for the deletion to finish it doesn't help you (although according to @JoelFan waiting for File.Delete to finish doesn't guarantee the file is actually deleted anyway).

Interestingly enough, in testing against a network share, it seems that opening the stream as such and doing nothing with it is significantly faster (~40%) than File.Delete:

using (new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None, 4096, FileOptions.DeleteOnClose)) { }
0

I may be wrong, but in the case someone tries to access the same file on a cross thread operation, it would be needed to block the file for access until the delete operation is completed.

1
  • Wouldn't file locking still occur regardless of asynchronous? Async file i/o basically just allows you to not block while the os gets the file resources ready for you, then lets you know when it's ready.
    – aepheus
    May 15, 2012 at 20:26
-5

Perhaps because you can just as easily do it yourself?

var t = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => File.Delete("file.txt"));
// ...
t.Wait();
5
  • LOL, we answered at the exact same time. Now they have two ways. May 15, 2012 at 19:41
  • 14
    This would basically create a new thread and run a synchronous delete. That is not what I'm looking for. The real asynchronous functions aren't using threading but rather make use of native functions. If you use a thread you're still blocking that thread to wait for the file i/o, if you use async functions your not.
    – aepheus
    May 15, 2012 at 20:19
  • 1
    @aepheus What you are describing is "overlapped" I/O. I'm not sure why there is no DeleteFile variant that accepts OVERLAPPED structure, but .NET wraps these functions and consequently doesn't provide what you asked. BTW, the code above will not necessarily create a new thread - it will use the thread pool and won't "bombard" the OS with too many threads. Did you actually measure and found that the task-based approach would be a performance problem? May 15, 2012 at 23:00
  • Offloading work to another thread is not the same thing as asynchronous. The whole point of asynchronous is that no work and no thread is blocked while that operation is completing. Apr 20, 2017 at 20:39
  • This will free up your UI if you await it, but it isn't true async,
    – rollsch
    Feb 21, 2018 at 23:59

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