8

Sounds like an easy question, I know. I am literally stumped.

Here are two websites that have made the simple calculator:

http://thefeecalculator.com

http://ppcalc.com

I'm needing to calculate these PayPal's fees in my PHP application.

Here's what I got, say we wanted to be paid $30 "even" for membership fees. This is the function I'm using to calculate what we should charge to make up for it using PayPal's calculations (also described on both of the sites above): 2.9% of the transaction + $0.30.

function memfees()
{
    $calc = round((30 * .029) + 30 + .30,2);
    return $calc;
}

Test it here: http://matt.mw/junk/php/memfees.php As you can see, it says 31.17. Both of the other websites say it should be 31.20. If I try $130.00, mine calculates to $134.07 and both of theirs calculate to $134.19.

What am I doing wrong?

Why am I using a Round function? Percentages cause some decimals to go past the hundredths place, and PayPal generates an error if there is more then 2 digits after the decimal. I thought people normally round money, (e.g. $31.6342 will be $31.63) but if that is the case, what am I doing wrong in my function? The amount that is off is further if there are large payments. This leads me to believe that something is wrong with the percentage portion.

Could you offer some help on this?

Thank you for your time.

1
  • Because 2.9% of 31.20 + .30 = 1.20; when you raise the amount, more money goes to PayPal :)
    – Ja͢ck
    May 16, 2012 at 6:57

5 Answers 5

16

Your function does seem strange. To break it down, PayPal is charging a fixed rate of $.30, and adding a transaction percentage fee of 2.9%.

The formula for this is to add the $.30 and then divide by the percentage difference (100% - 2.9%), which will give you the amount prior to the actual reduction by PayPal.

function memfees($amount)
{
    $amount += .30;
    return $amount / (1 - .029);
}

You can round and float that as you wish.

9
  • PayPal is charging a fixed rate of $.30, and adding a transaction percentage fee of 2.9%. Where did you find that? It seems correct but i want a proof ;)
    – meze
    May 16, 2012 at 7:27
  • This must be how it is calculated. The other answer was onto it but still had a lot of question. I was able to replicate the calculators by putting a round function around all of this. Thank you, Jordan!
    – WebMW
    May 16, 2012 at 7:52
  • To clarify: The difference is that Paypal uses the final amount to calculate the 2.9%, not the $30. So fees = X*0.029 + 0.3, and you get Y = X - fees. So Y = X-(X*1.029+0.3) = X(1-0.029)-0.3, so X = (Y + 0.3)/(1-0.029), given above.
    – Phil H
    May 16, 2012 at 11:57
  • @meze it's on their website. Pretty standard. Not sure what you're asking for.
    – Jordan
    May 16, 2012 at 12:22
  • 2
    @Jordan on their website i see 2.9% + $0.3 fee which doesn't tell me that %2.9 applies to $0.3...
    – meze
    May 16, 2012 at 12:29
7

Because you're thinking about it the wrong way around.

You don't charge $30, you charge $31.20. Paypal takes the transaction fee (2.9%) off of that and then takes $0.30 from the result:

  $31.20
*  0.971 (1 - 2.9%)
  ------
  $30.2952
- $00.30
  ------
  $29.9952

So you have to reverse this process, i.e. add $0.3 to your total and divide by 0.971.

9
  • Actually, I'm not sure whether the fixed transaction fee gets subtracted before or after the percentage. This could account for a tiny difference ($0.0089) in the final result
    – Gareth
    May 16, 2012 at 7:09
  • Can you give a link to the paypal where you found that it takes the transaction fee first and then calculates 2.9% ?
    – meze
    May 16, 2012 at 7:10
  • Paypal says 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction. So the percentage first.
    – meze
    May 16, 2012 at 7:13
  • Ok, fair enough. As I say the difference is less than a cent but I've edited the calculation
    – Gareth
    May 16, 2012 at 7:18
  • So if we want to get 30.5, then we shall charge 31.71 (30.5/.0971 + 0.3). Now we use ppcal.com and set person sends 31.71, and we get $30.49. Something is wrong again ;s
    – meze
    May 16, 2012 at 7:23
7

Here's a good mathematical explanation of how this works. We have this number, x, which we want to charge a credit card. We don't know what this number is, but we know that when we subtract 30 cents and subtract 2.9% of x, we get y, which is the amount of money we take home:

y = x - x * .029 - .3

We know y, because we know what amount we want to take home. Say, we wanted to take home $100, then y = 100. But what's x?

y = x - x * .029 - .3
y + .3 = x - x * .029
         = x(1 - .029)
(y + .3) / (1 - .029) = x
x = (y + .3) / .971

Note: because x - x * .029 can be written as x * 1 - x * .029 then all need to do is just use distributive property and we come up with x(1 - .029)

So we come up with the formula:

x = (y + .3) / .971

Which defines this infamous number, x. Also, it answers our question; What amount should I charge a card in order to cover the transaction fee and not fall short of the amount we want to take home? Well, all we need to do is fill in the take home amount, which is y:

x = (100 + .3) / .971
x = ~103.30

I hope this helps clarify.

1

In C#

public decimal CalcFee()
{
    //PayPal Percentage Fee = 0.29%, Fix Fee = 0.3
    var sum = this.Items.Sum(c => c.Price * c.Qty); //Total Items
    return Math.Round(Math.Round((sum + (decimal)0.3) / (decimal)0.971, 2) - sum, 2);
}
0

A math problem. 100 % is not what you think:

  • 100 % + the fixed fee needs to be charged
  • 100 % is actualy 97,1 % payout ($ 30) + 2,9 % fee
  • To get 100 %, we apply the rule of three

e.g.:

 97.10 % = $ 30
  1.00 % = $ 30 / 97.1
100.00 % = $ 30 / 97.1 * 100
============================
100.00 % ~ 30,90

Now we need to add the fixed fee:

$ 30,90 +  $ 0.30

Which is resulting in the requested $ 31.20

So what does this mean in Code?

//untested, not a php developer anymore
function requiredChargement($requiredPrice)
{
    $requiredPercentage = 100.0 - 2.9;
    $fullVariableCost = $requiredPrice / requiredPercentage * 100.0;
    return round($fullVariableCost + 0.3, 2);
}

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