31

I have a file with the following contents:

WORD1 WORD2 WORD3

How can I use sed to replace the string between WORD1 and WORD3 with foo, such that the contents of the file are changed to the following?:

WORD1 foo WORD3

I tried the following, but obviously I'm missing something because that does not produce the desired results:

sed -i '' 's/WORD1.*WORD3/foo/g' file.txt

2
  • Could there be something like WORD1 foo WORD3 bar WORD1 baz WORD3 in your string (i. e. more than one match per string)? – Tim Pietzcker May 16 '12 at 7:18
  • Ah - good question, but no, it's not really necessary to accommodate for more than one match in this scenario. – Camden S. May 16 '12 at 12:49
39
sed -i 's/WORD1.*WORD3/WORD1 foo WORD3/g' file.txt

or

sed -i 's/(WORD1).*(WORD3)/\1 foo \2/g' file.txt

You might need to escape round brackets, depends on your sed variant.

4
  • what should I do to allow WORD1, WORD2 and WORD3 be any strings? – Valeriy Van Sep 23 '13 at 13:01
  • @ValeriyVan, you need to escape delimiting chars in your WORDs (/ in my example) as well as all other chars, that sed treats as controlling ones. – vyegorov Sep 24 '13 at 12:26
  • The second option results in: sed: -e expression #1, char 30: invalid reference \2 on 's' command's RHS on GNU bash, version 4.4.19 – user3751385 Oct 29 '18 at 9:28
  • 2
    @user3751385 escape the ( and ) – Sulli Feb 2 '19 at 19:42
7

This might work for you:

sed 's/\S\+/foo/2' file

or perhaps:

sed 's/[^[:space:]][^[:space:]]*/foo/2' file

If WORD1 and WORD3 occur more than once:

echo "WORD1 WORD2 WORD3 BLA BLA WORD1 WORD4 WORD3" |
sed 's/WORD3/\n&/g;s/\(WORD1\)[^\n]*\n/\1 foo /g'
WORD1 foo WORD3 BLA BLA WORD1 foo WORD3
1
  • [^[:space:]][^[:space:]]* can be replaced by [^[:space:]]\+ (as you have used in your first example) in some versions of sed. The /2 is a nice touch. +1 – Dennis Williamson May 17 '12 at 4:47
3

content of a sample file.txt

$ cat file.txt 
WORD1 WORD2 WORD3
WORD4 WORD5 WORD6
WORD7 WORD8 WORD9

(Correction by @DennisWilliamson in comment)
$ sed -e 's/\([^ ]\+\) \+\([^ ]\+\) \+\(.*\)/\1 foo \3/' file.txt

WORD1 foo WORD3
WORD4 foo WORD6
WORD7 foo WORD9

while awk is somehow simpler

$ awk -F' ' '{ print $1" foo "$3 }' file.txt

WORD1 foo WORD3
WORD4 foo WORD6
WORD7 foo WORD9
2
  • 1
    It's not necessary to escape any of the spaces. And [^\ ] means "any character other than space or backslash. I would suggest \+ instead of * since, as is, your command could replace an empty line. Also g is unnecessary - as is the redirection. – Dennis Williamson May 17 '12 at 4:40
  • Now it won't work at all. You misunderstood what I meant. sed -e 's/\([^ ]\+\) \+\([^ ]\+\) \+\(.*\)/\1 foo \3/' file.txt – Dennis Williamson May 17 '12 at 11:22

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