I wonder if there is any way to differentiate the function calls (with arrays as parameters) shown in the following code:

#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>

template <size_t Size>
void foo_array( const char (&data)[Size] )
{
    std::cout << "named\n";
}

template <size_t Size>
void foo_array( char (&&data)[Size] )  //rvalue of arrays?
{
    std::cout << "temporary\n";
}


struct A {};

void foo( const A& a )
{
    std::cout << "named\n";
}

void foo( A&& a )
{
    std::cout << "temporary\n";
}


int main( /* int argc, char* argv[] */ )
{
    A a;
    const A a2;

    foo(a);
    foo(A());               //Temporary -> OK!
    foo(a2);

    //------------------------------------------------------------

    char arr[] = "hello";
    const char arr2[] = "hello";

    foo_array(arr);
    foo_array("hello");     //How I can differentiate this?
    foo_array(arr2);

    return 0;
}

The foo "function family" is able to distinguish a temporary object from a named. Is not the case of foo_array.

Is it possible in C++11 ? If not, do you think could be possible? (obviously changing the standard)

Regards. Fernando.

  • 1
    If you used std::array<> instead of raw C-arrays, this would be trivial. – ildjarn May 16 '12 at 18:42
up vote 15 down vote accepted

There is nothing wrong with foo_array. It's the test case that is bad: "hello" is an lvalue! Think about it. It is not a temporary: string literals have static storage duration.

An array rvalue would be something like this:

template <typename T>
using alias = T;
// you need this thing because char[23]{} is not valid...

foo_array(alias<char[23]> {});
  • 1
    Here's a similar example (downgraded to fit GCC 4.5 limited C++11 support) on ideone: ideone.com/lgItR – R. Martinho Fernandes May 16 '12 at 18:49
  • 2
    Very nice. Can a temporary array decay to a pointer? I.e. is it something that actually has an address? – Kerrek SB May 16 '12 at 18:50
  • @KerrekSB interesting question that I'm afraid I don't know the answer to (and I do't have time for much research right now). May be worth posting a new question about it. – R. Martinho Fernandes May 16 '12 at 18:53
  • @R.MartinhoFernandes Thanks! You are right. I was confused. The question is meaningless. Nice trick! – Fernando Pelliccioni May 16 '12 at 20:03
  • 1
    @KerrekSB Yes, it can decay. However the address is that of the first element, not of the temporary itself. It is already possible to access subobject of a temporary in other fashions (e.g. foo {}.bar -- note that you can't take that address though, this is a prvalue). – Luc Danton May 17 '12 at 11:10

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.