16

I'm going through the Head First Design Patterns book and doing my best to convert the code from their Java to C#. After the book discussed the observer pattern it mentioned that Java has classes/interfaces built in, as does .NET4. So I began researching how to use it properly and I have most of it figured out except for the Subscribe() method.

If you look at the MSDN Article when you try subscribing an IObserver, the method returns an IDisposable. Why would that be necessary? Why not just implement a method that unsubcribes the IObserver based on a method argument? I researched the reason to use an IDisposable interface. I also read this but didn't quite understand the difference/what it was trying to tell me:

It returns a reference to an IDisposable interface. This enables observers to unsubscribe (that is, to stop receiving notifications) before the provider has finished sending them and called the subscriber's OnCompleted method.

4
  • I'm coming to the conclusion that Microsoft could have gone either way with this. I just personally think it would be easier to pass an argument. Maybe Microsoft wanted to avoid arguments, but to have two variables/instances makes it harder to maintain. Again, this is my opinion.
    – Adam Beck
    May 16, 2012 at 20:09
  • 3
    This has a pretty good explanation
    – SwDevMan81
    May 16, 2012 at 20:12
  • Either I don't fully understand this response or it doesn't quite answer my question. After seeing my question written down, I think it was just a choice by Microsoft. You could still unsubscribe from an observable with something like this: Observable.Unsubscribe(Observer)
    – Adam Beck
    May 16, 2012 at 20:22
  • @AdamBeck: As I note in my answer, that approach has some annoying quirks and limitations. Having the subscriber hold publisher-defined information for how to unsubscribe allows many subscription-management approaches to be handled much more cleanly and effectively. My one complaint is that Microsoft didn't mandate that the IDisposable returned by the Subscribe method must be safely invokable at any time in any threading context.
    – supercat
    May 16, 2012 at 22:11

6 Answers 6

9

The information that is required to cancel a subscription will vary depending upon how the event publisher manages subscriptions. The approach used for events--passing to the Remove method the delegate previously passed to the Add method--is kinda sorta workable, but has some significant deficiencies. Among them:

  1. It will often require the event publisher to perform a linear search to locate the record which contains information related to the subscription. If there's a possibility of an event having many subscribers, this could create O(N^2) behavior needlessly. If subscribers are kept in some kind of linked list (either linked objects or index-linked array slots) and the unsubscribe request holds information about the subscription to be canceled, subscriptions and unsubscriptions can both handled in constant time. Further, unsubscription can be handled safely and easily in lock-free non-blocking fashion (using one `CompareExchange` on what will most likely be an uncontested array slot) that can safely be done in a `Finalize` context.
  2. If one delegate gets subscribed multiple times to an event where the order of processing matters, and code tries to cancel the first subscription, the last subscription will get canceled and the first one will remain in effect.
  3. If a delegate `D` is subscribed, a multicast delegate `ABCD` containing `A`, `B`, `C`, and `D` is subscribed, and then `D` is unsubscribed, then delegates `DABC` will remain subscribed, in the order, even if code tries to unsubscribe `ABCD`. Note that one could avoid this problem if one used a `List` instead of `delegateType.Combine`, but the other issues would remain.

Having the event subscription method return an object that can be used to cancel the subscription avoids these problems. The biggest question then becomes what type of object should be used. Three choices come to mind:

  1. A delegate (probably parameterless, returning `void`)
  2. Some `ICancelSubscription` interface, with a single method (probably parameterless, returning `void`) to cancel the subscription
  3. `IDisposable`, an interface which exists, has a single parameterless method, and is widely used for cleanup-related purposes

Using a delegate would be a reasonable choice. It could be easily encapsulate whatever information was necessary to cancel a subscription without the user having to worry about what form that information might take. Using a delegate would entail the allocation of at least one extra heap object (for the delegate itself) and possibly two (the second being an object holding the unsubscription information). Using IDisposable would be essentially the same as using a delegate, except that one would call Dispose rather than Invoke; in many cases, though, IDisposable would have a slight advantage in terms of efficiency. Using some other interface would also be workable, but wouldn't really offer any advantage over using the existing IDisposable.

4

It seems that your main question here is why Microsoft choose:

interface IObservable<T>
{
    IDisposable Subscribe(IObserver<T> observer);
}

instead of

interface IObservable<T>
{
    void Subscribe(IObserver<T> observer);
    void Unsubscribe(IObserver<T> observer);
}

While I am not privy to the design meetings or the reasonings that came out of them, I can speculate some reasons why this choice was made.

The best reason I can think of for choosing the first format is that it allows you to track only the IDisposable returned from Subscribe rather than both the observable and observer. For example, suppose you had code like this:

var obsSource = /* some observable source */
var subscription = obsSource.Where(x => x != null).Subscribe(Console.WriteLine);
// stuff...
subscription.Dispose();

In this situation, I never need to hold a reference to the subscribed to observable (returned from Where) nor explicitly create an observer (via the Subscribe extension method). If the second option had been chosen, you would have to do this instead:

var obsSource = /* some observable source */
var filtered = obsSource.Where(x => x != null);
var observer = Observer.Create(Console.WriteLine);
filtered.Subscribe(observer);
// stuff...
filtered.Unsubscribe(observer);

On the surface, this does not look too different, but as I discussed in another question, intermediate observables need not be kept once the subscription is made. If the second approach were taken, you would still need to create and keep observers for each step in the chain, and you would also have to keep references to the intermediate observables.

Version 1 makes the duality with IEnumerable easier to see than method 2. This may have been part of the initial design, but it is certainly a less important reason for the long haul.

1
  • Your suggestions as to why it's a good pattern make sense; what do you think of my answer below? Would you agree with me that it would have been good for Microsoft specify that a non-broken implementation of IObservable<T> must return an IDisposable that may be disposed from any threading context? Having the IObservable keep an IDisposable makes thread-safe unsubscription pretty easy to manage (if subscriptions hold weak references to their targets, all the unsubscribe method would have to do is set a "CancelSubscription" flag which could be polled during a later Subscribe).
    – supercat
    May 16, 2012 at 23:46
4

A pair of Subscribe and Unsubscribe methods would be non-compositional. Every operator would need to keep a dictionary of observers that were passed in to Subscribe, mapping those onto each observer instance that was passed to dependent observable sequences (passed in to the operator).

For example, consider writing a Merge operator for two sources. Today, this looks pretty much like this (textarea compiled):

static IObservable<T> Merge<T>(IObservable<T> xs, IObservable<T> ys)
{
    return Observable.Create<T>(observer =>
    {
        var n = 2;

        var mergeObserver = Observer.Create<T>(
            observer.OnNext,
            observer.OnError,
            () =>
            {
                // protected by the gate, see use of Synchronize below
                if (--n == 0)
                    observer.OnCompleted();
            }
        );

        var gate = new object();

        return new CompositeDisposable(
            xs.Synchronize(gate).Subscribe(mergeObserver),
            ys.Synchronize(gate).Subscribe(mergeObserver)
        );
    });
}

As you can see, composition of sequences also leads to composition of the IDisposable objects returned from the Subscribe calls. Notice there's a lot of stuff going on in Observable.Create that automatically disposes the returned IDisposable upon sending a terminal message to the given observer. In this case, calls to observer.OnError and observer.OnCompleted take care of disposing both subscriptions in the CompositeDisposable. (But that's a whole different subject to talk about some time.)

The code below is hypothetical, assuming the existence of Subscribe/Unsubscribe pairs on IObservable (hence with a Create factory method that has two actions):

static IObservable<T> Merge<T>(IObservable<T> xs, IObservable<T> ys)
{
    var map = new Dictionary<IObserver<T>, IObserver<T>>();

    return Observable.Create<T>(
        subscribe: observer =>
        {
            var gate = new object();
            var n = 2;

            var mergeObserver = Observer.Create<T>(
                x =>
                {
                    lock (gate)
                        observer.OnNext(x);
                },
                ex =>
                {
                    lock (gate)
                        observer.OnError(ex);
                },
                () =>
                {
                    lock (gate)
                        if (--n == 0)
                            observer.OnCompleted();
                }
            );

            //
            // Using .Synchronize(gate) would be a mess, because then we need to
            // keep the  two synchronized sequences around as well, such that we
            // can call Unsubscribe on those. So, we're "better off" inlining the
            // locking code in the observer.
            //
            // (Or: how composition goes down the drain!)
            //
            xs.Subscribe(mergeObserver);
            ys.Subscribe(mergeObserver);

            lock (map)
                map[observer] = mergeObserver;
        },
        unsubscribe: observer =>
        {
            var mergeObserver = default(IObserver<T>);
            lock (map)
                map.TryGetValue(observer, out mergeObserver);

            if (mergeObserver != null)
            {
                xs.Unsubscribe(mergeObserver);
                ys.Unsubscribe(mergeObserver);
            }
        }
    );
}

Beware this is hypothetical; I haven't even thought about more edge cases, nor how this Create would work in order to clean up after itself upon a call to OnError or OnCompleted. Also, with Merge as an example we're lucky we don't have other resources to care about during "Unsubscribe" (e.g. scheduler jobs).

Hope this helps,

-Bart (Rx team)

1

Calling an unsubscribe method means that you need to pass in the same instance that subscribed. You have to keep a reference. If you have many observables of different type you need many different references kept.

Clean up code becomes messy with an unsubscribe method.

However, with IDisposable you only need one structure to hold all references - List<IDisposable> (or you can use Rx's CompositeDisposable).

Now your clean up code can be very neat and tidy.

I have gone further and created IDisposable instances for all clean up code - not just from Rx subscriptions. It makes life very easy.

1
  • In vb.net, it's possible for a class to inherit a DisposableManager class and wrap the creation of IDisposable objects--even within field initializers--such that a single statement will take care of disposal. In C#, one can fudge something similar using a threadstatic field, but in vb.net no threadstatic field is needed. I wish the creators of .net had better designed such simplified cleanup into the framework; it does make things nice, but having to inherit a class or duplicate code for such purpose is a bit irksome.
    – supercat
    May 17, 2012 at 2:52
1

In addition to the other reasons given, IDisposable lets you use a using block as well.

using (var subscription = source.Subscribe(observer))
{
    // ...
}
0

It makes it very easy to ensure that the subscription for the observer is terminated when the observer itself is Disposed. Consider that Subscribe is usually called by the class that implements IObservable:

class MyObserver<Foo> : IObserver<Foo>, IDisposable {

    private IDisposable _subscription;

    public MyObserver(IObservable<T> eventSource) {
        _subscription = eventSource.Subscribe(this);
    }

    // implementation of IObservable members here

    public void Dispose() {
        _subscription.Dispose();
    }
}

Now, when my MyObserver instance is disposed, the subscription is going to automatically be disposed along with it:

public partial class MyGUIThing : Form {
    private MyObservable<Foo> _observer = new MyObservable<Foo>(someEventSource);
    // whatever else
}

When an instance of this form is created, a subscription is started. When the form is closed and the _observer is finalized, the subscription will automatically be disposed as well.

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