17

I'm guessing it's fgets, but I can't find the specific syntax. I'm trying to read out (in a string I'm thinking is easier) the last line added to a log file.

43

The simplest naive solution is simply:

$file = "/path/to/file";
$data = file($file);
$line = $data[count($data)-1];

Though, this WILL load the whole file into memory. Possibly a problem (or not). A better solution is this:

$file = escapeshellarg($file); // for the security concious (should be everyone!)
$line = `tail -n 1 $file`;
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  • 1
    Note that this is very unsafe unless you are using escapeshellarg(): de.php.net/manual/en/function.escapeshellarg.php – soulmerge Jun 30 '09 at 9:49
  • 7
    Correction, it's only unsafe if you're accepting user input as the file path (and then you should be doing all sorts of things to validate it). If you use a constant like in the example, then it's perfectly fine and you can save yourself a function call. Of course, it's probably not a bad idea anyway, just to get in the habit. – Matthew Scharley Jun 30 '09 at 9:53
  • 1
    Extending your comment a bit further down ("If you are on a Mac...?") - What if you are on Windows and don't have the "tail" command? (I know there's a Win32 port of "tail", that's beside the point). Apart from that - even though I have not tested it I would not be surprised if creating a new process for every request does not scale too well. – Tomalak Jun 30 '09 at 12:42
  • 1
    It would be nice if you include the rest of the code necessary on the escapeshellarg example. Creating a string does not magically get the last line of anything. – carter Jul 28 '14 at 20:04
  • 1
    @carter Nope; the shell out to tail does that. Nothing in life is magic, sadly. – Matthew Scharley Jul 31 '14 at 12:22
14

This looks like it is what you are looking for:

tekkie.flashbit.net: Tail functionality in PHP

It implements a function that uses fseek() with a negative index to roll up the file from the end. You can define how many lines you want to be returned.

The code also is available as a Gist on GitHub:

// full path to text file
define("TEXT_FILE", "/home/www/default-error.log");
// number of lines to read from the end of file
define("LINES_COUNT", 10);


function read_file($file, $lines) {
    //global $fsize;
    $handle = fopen($file, "r");
    $linecounter = $lines;
    $pos = -2;
    $beginning = false;
    $text = array();
    while ($linecounter > 0) {
        $t = " ";
        while ($t != "\n") {
            if(fseek($handle, $pos, SEEK_END) == -1) {
                $beginning = true; 
                break; 
            }
            $t = fgetc($handle);
            $pos --;
        }
        $linecounter --;
        if ($beginning) {
            rewind($handle);
        }
        $text[$lines-$linecounter-1] = fgets($handle);
        if ($beginning) break;
    }
    fclose ($handle);
    return array_reverse($text);
}

$fsize = round(filesize(TEXT_FILE)/1024/1024,2);

echo "<strong>".TEXT_FILE."</strong>\n\n";
echo "File size is {$fsize} megabytes\n\n";
echo "Last ".LINES_COUNT." lines of the file:\n\n";

$lines = read_file(TEXT_FILE, LINES_COUNT);
foreach ($lines as $line) {
    echo $line;
}
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  • Iiinteresting... but utterly useless next to the much easier method of just shelling the issue over to tail (unless you really are on a very seriously overworked server) – Matthew Scharley Jun 30 '09 at 10:07
  • 8
    "utterly useless" is a bit harsh – Tomalak Jun 30 '09 at 10:17
  • 2
    Well crud, now you're going to make me go benchmark them aren't you... 'cause I'm curious... – Matthew Scharley Jul 3 '09 at 9:58
  • 1
    I am, too. So if you benchmark it, I'd be interested in your findings. :-) Ideally this would be tested on a log file that is too large to fit into the file system cache. – Tomalak Jul 3 '09 at 10:06
  • 1
    utterly useful ;-) if you cannot depend on the availability of ´tail´ in shell, e.g. not UNIX or some shared hosting. The performance difference must be marginal since the php code efficiently uses fseek to read the file tail only. – PaulH May 8 '19 at 7:52
8
define('YOUR_EOL', "\n");
$fp = fopen('yourfile.txt', 'r');

$pos = -1; $line = ''; $c = '';
do {
    $line = $c . $line;
    fseek($fp, $pos--, SEEK_END);
    $c = fgetc($fp);
} while ($c != YOUR_EOL);

echo $line;

fclose($fp);

This is better, since it does not load the complete file into memory...

Set YOUR_EOL to your correct line endings, if you use the same line endings as the default line endings of the OS where your script resides, you could use the constant PHP_EOL.

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4
function seekLastLine($f) {
    $pos = -2;
    do {
        fseek($f, $pos--, SEEK_END);
        $ch = fgetc($f);
    } while ($ch != "\n");
}

-2 because last char can be \n

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3

You either have to read the file in line by line and save the last read line to get it.

Or if on unix/linux you might consider using the shell command tail

tail -n 1 filename
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1

This one wont break for a 1 or 0 line file.

function readlastline($fileName)
{

       $fp = @fopen($fileName, "r");
       $begining = fseek($fp, 0);      
       $pos = -1;
       $t = " ";
       while ($t != "\n") {
             fseek($fp, $pos, SEEK_END);
             if(ftell($fp) == $begining){
              break;
             }
             $t = fgetc($fp);
             $pos = $pos - 1;
       }
       $t = fgets($fp);
       fclose($fp);
       return $t;
}
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1

...Why just read the last line?

function readLines($fp, $num) {

    $line_count = 0; $line = ''; $pos = -1; $lines = array(); $c = '';

    while($line_count < $num) {
        $line = $c . $line; 
        fseek($fp, $pos--, SEEK_END);
        $c = fgetc($fp);
        if($c == "\n") { $line_count++; $lines[] = $line; $line = ''; $c = ''; }
    }   
    return $lines;
}

$filename = "content.txt";
$fp = @fopen($filename, "r");

print_r(readLines($fp, 2));

fclose($fp);
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0

If you want to read a file line by line the file function reads the contents of a file, line by line and returns each line as an element of an array.

So you could do something simple like:

$lines    = file('log.txt');
$lastLine = array_pop($lines);
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  • 3
    Really? For a multi-megabyte log file of which 99.99% is of no interest to me I would try to avoid loading all of it into an array just to throw it away immediately. – Tomalak Jun 30 '09 at 9:44
  • No denying that this is inefficient, but it works; and who knows how long the file is? I would use the tail command in my environment, but WiseDonkey didn't specify any. That's a nice function you linked to, though. – Kieran Hall Jun 30 '09 at 9:52
  • 1
    file() and file_get_contents() are both great file manipulation functions, specially if you know the files involved are relatively small and just want to do something quickly and easily. – Matthew Scharley Jun 30 '09 at 9:56
  • @Matthew Scharley: The OP spoke of log files. These are the opposite of "relatively small" most of the time. – Tomalak Jun 30 '09 at 10:18
0

@unique_stephen, your answer is flawed. PHP fseek returns 0 for success and -1 for failure. Storing the result in $begining (sic) and then later using it in a filter for ftell() isn't correct. If my reputation were higher I would have voted you down and left a comment. Here is a modified version of unique_stephen's function.

function readlastline($fileName)
{
    $fp = @fopen($fileName, "r");
    if (fseek($fp, 0) == -1)
        exit('Cannot seek to beginning of the file'); 
    $pos = -1;
    $t = " ";
    while ($t != "\n") {
        if (fseek($fp, $pos, SEEK_END) == -1)
            exit('Cannot seek to the end of the file');
        if (ftell($fp) == 0) {
            break;
        }
        $t = fgetc($fp);
        $pos = $pos - 1;
    }
    $t = fgets($fp);
    fclose($fp);
    return $t;
}

NOTE: PHP's fseek cannot manage to seek to the end of files larger than PHP_MAX_INT which is 32bit signed even on 64bit binaries.

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