26

The answer to Mail multipart/alternative vs multipart/mixed suggests that attachments should be peers of the multipart/alternative message, like:

  • multipart/mixed
    • multipart/alternative
      • text/plain
      • text/html
    • some/thing (disposition: attachment)
    • some/thing (disposition: attachment)
    • ...

I'd like to send email with an html part with some inline images and a plain text alternative. What is the preferred MIME layout for the various parts? A couple of options appear in example code and in other questions, but which have worked best in practice? My inclination is this:

  • multipart/alternative
    • text/plain
    • multipart/related
      • text/html (referencing the images by cid)
      • image/gif
      • image/gif
      • ...

That way, the images are clearly for the purpose of rendering the html part. A full example of this would be:

From: Rich Example <[email protected]>
To: A Recipient <[email protected]>
Subject: An example of email with images and a plain alternative
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="outer-boundary"

This is a MIME-encoded message. If you are seeing this, your mail
reader is old.
--outer-boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

This message might make you :) or it might make you :(

--outer-boundary
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/related;
  type="text/html"; start="<body@here>"; boundary="inner-boundary"

--inner-boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
Content-Disposition: inline
Content-ID: <body@here>

<html>
 <body>
  This message might make you
  <img src="cid:smile@here" alt="smile">
  or it might make you
  <img src="cid:frown@here" alt="frown">
 </body>
</html>

--inner-boundary
Content-Type: image/gif
Content-Disposition: inline
Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64
Content-ID: <smile@here>

R0lGODlhEAAQAKEBAAAAAP//AP//AP//ACH5BAEKAAIALAAAAAAQABAAAAIzlA2px6IBw2
IpWglOvTahDgGdI0ZlGW5meKlci6JrasrqkypxJr8S0oNpgqkGLtcY6hoFADs=

--inner-boundary
Content-Type: image/gif
Content-Disposition: inline
Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64
Content-ID: <frown@here>

R0lGODlhEAAQAKEBAAAAAAD//wD//wD//yH5BAEKAAIALAAAAAAQABAAAAIzlA2px6IBw2
IpWglOvTahDgGdI0ZlGW5meKlci75drDzm5uLZyZ1I3Mv8ZB5Krtgg1RoFADs=

--inner-boundary--

--outer-boundary--
2
  • 1
    Appears to be an exact dupe of the question it refs: stackoverflow.com/questions/3902455/… Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 18:29
  • 3
    A slight difference in intent (whether i clearly conveyed it or not) might have to do with the purpose of the attachments. If they are for the rich rendering (e.g. logos, wingdings, etc.), should they be "in" the rich alternative? The ref'd question also makes no mention of related. Commented Mar 31, 2013 at 20:52

1 Answer 1

11

You are right. Inline images should be stored in a multipart/related mime-entity (RFC 2387) and offering multiple content-type options can be done with multipart/alternative (RFC 2046).
For adding attachments you may put the whole structure into a multipart/mixed and add the attachments.

  • multipart/mixed
    • multipart/alternative
      • text/plain
      • multipart/related
        • text/html
        • image/gif
        • image/gif
    • some/thing (disposition: attachment)
    • some/thing (disposition: attachment)

You can also use inline image in text/plain messages, but not all MUA support this. (Use none or disposition: inline)

  • multipart/mixed
    • text/plain (text above image)
    • image/gif
    • text/plain (text below image)

And I dont't know a clean way to combine this with a multipart/alternative HTML-email.

2
  • Sorry, I don't think this correct. Inside multipart/alternative there are only two items: text and html. The alternative is inside a multipart/related. See: stackoverflow.com/a/40420648/633961
    – guettli
    Commented Nov 4, 2016 at 10:50
  • @guettli - not true. Per RFC1341 you can have as many alternatives as you like - you can include a PDF version, a video version, etc..
    – dsz
    Commented Mar 15, 2023 at 11:06

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