61

With Sqlite, a "select..from" command returns the results "output", which prints (in python):

>>print output
[(12.2817, 12.2817), (0, 0), (8.52, 8.52)]

It seems to be a list of tuples. I would like to either convert "output" in a simple 1D array (=list in Python I guess):

[12.2817, 12.2817, 0, 0, 8.52, 8.52]

or a 2x3 matrix:

12.2817 12.2817
0          0 
8.52     8.52

to be read via "output[i][j]"

The flatten command does not do the job for the 1st option, and I have no idea for the second one... :)

Could you please give me a hint? Some thing fast would be great as real data are much bigger (here is just a simple example).

107

By far the fastest (and shortest) solution posted:

list(sum(output, ()))

About 50% faster than the itertools solution, and about 70% faster than the map solution.

  • 7
    @Joel nice, but I wonder how it works? list(output[0]+output[1]+output[2]) gives the desired result but list(sum(output)) not. Why? What "magic" does the () do? – Kyss Tao May 5 '13 at 18:39
  • 9
    Ok, I should have read the manual g. It seems sum(sequence[, start]): sum adds start which defaults to 0 rather then just starting from sequence[0] if it exists and then adding the rest of the elements. Sorry for bothering you. – Kyss Tao May 5 '13 at 18:44
  • 2
    This is a well-known anti-pattern: don't use sum to concatenate sequences, it results in a quadratic time algorithm. Indeed, the sum function will complain if you try to do this with strings! – juanpa.arrivillaga Apr 11 '18 at 22:42
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga: agreed. There are very few use cases where this would be preferable. – Joel Cornett Apr 11 '18 at 23:19
  • 5
    Yes, fast but completely obtuse. You'd have to leave a comment as to what it is actually doing :( – CpILL May 22 '18 at 21:30
25

List comprehension approach that works with Iterable types and is faster than other methods shown here.

flattened = [item for sublist in l for item in sublist]

l is the list to flatten (called output in the OP's case)


timeit tests:

l = list(zip(range(99), range(99)))  # list of tuples to flatten

List comprehension

[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]

timeit result = 7.67 µs ± 129 ns per loop

List extend() method

flattened = []
list(flattened.extend(item) for item in l)

timeit result = 11 µs ± 433 ns per loop

sum()

list(sum(l, ()))

timeit result = 24.2 µs ± 269 ns per loop

  • I had to use this on a large dataset, the list comprehension method was by far the fastest! – nbeuchat Aug 16 '18 at 6:36
  • I did a little change to the .extend solution and now performs a bit better. check it out on your timeit to compare – Totoro Nov 20 '18 at 17:00
18

In Python 3 you can use the * syntax to flatten a list of iterables:

>>> t = [ (1,2), (3,4), (5,6) ]
>>> t
[(1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6)]
>>> import itertools
>>> list(itertools.chain(*t))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
>>> 
7

Or you can flatten the list like this:

reduce(lambda x,y:x+y, map(list, output))
  • reduce(lambda x,y:x+y, output) seems to work directly converting to a long tuple (which can be converted to a list). Why use map(list, output) inside the reduce() call? Maybe It's more in line with the fact that tuples are immutable, lists are mutable. – Paul Rougieux Mar 20 '19 at 14:47
7

use itertools chain:

>>> import itertools
>>> list(itertools.chain.from_iterable([(12.2817, 12.2817), (0, 0), (8.52, 8.52)]))
[12.2817, 12.2817, 0, 0, 8.52, 8.52]
7

Update: Flattening using extend but without comprehension and without using list as iterator (fastest)

After checking the next answer to this that provided a faster solution via a list comprehension with dual for I did a little tweak and now it performs better, first the execution of list(...) was dragging a big percentage of time, then changing a list comprehension for a simple loop shaved a bit more as well.

The new solution is:

l = []
for row in output: l.extend(row)

Older:

Flattening with map/extend:

l = []
list(map(l.extend, output))

Flattening with list comprehension instead of map

l = []
list(l.extend(row) for row in output)

some timeits for new extend and the improvement gotten by just removing list(...) for [...]:

import timeit
t = timeit.timeit
o = "output=list(zip(range(1000000000), range(10000000))); l=[]"
steps_ext = "for row in output: l.extend(row)"
steps_ext_old = "list(l.extend(row) for row in output)"
steps_ext_remove_list = "[l.extend(row) for row in output]"
steps_com = "[item for sublist in output for item in sublist]"

print("new extend:      ", t(steps_ext, setup=o, number=10))
print("old extend w []: ", t(steps_ext_remove_list, setup=o, number=10))
print("comprehension:   ", t(steps_com, setup=o, number=10,))
print("old extend:      ", t(steps_ext_old, setup=o, number=10))

>>> new extend:       4.502427191007882
>>> old extend w []:  5.281140706967562
>>> comprehension:    5.54302118299529
>>> old extend:       6.840151469223201    
6
>>> flat_list = []
>>> nested_list = [(1, 2, 4), (0, 9)]
>>> for a_tuple in nested_list:
...     flat_list.extend(list(a_tuple))
... 
>>> flat_list
[1, 2, 4, 0, 9]
>>> 

you could easily move from list of tuple to single list as shown above.

4

This is what numpy was made for, both from a data structures, as well as speed perspective.

import numpy as np

output = [(12.2817, 12.2817), (0, 0), (8.52, 8.52)]
output_ary = np.array(output)   # this is your matrix 
output_vec = output_ary.ravel() # this is your 1d-array
2

In case of arbitrary nested lists(just in case):

def flatten(lst):
    result = []
    for element in lst: 
        if hasattr(element, '__iter__'):
            result.extend(flatten(element))
        else:
            result.append(element)
    return result

>>> flatten(output)
[12.2817, 12.2817, 0, 0, 8.52, 8.52]

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