I need to do something fairly simple: in my ASP.NET MVC application, I want to set a custom IIdentity / IPrincipal. Whichever is easier / more suitable. I want to extend the default so that I can call something like User.Identity.Id and User.Identity.Role. Nothing fancy, just some extra properties.

I've read tons of articles and questions but I feel like I'm making it harder than it actually is. I thought it would be easy. If a user logs on, I want to set a custom IIdentity. So I thought, I will implement Application_PostAuthenticateRequest in my global.asax. However, that is called on every request, and I don't want to do a call to the database on every request which would request all the data from the database and put in a custom IPrincipal object. That also seems very unnecessary, slow, and in the wrong place (doing database calls there) but I could be wrong. Or where else would that data come from?

So I thought, whenever a user logs in, I can add some necessary variables in my session, which I add to the custom IIdentity in the Application_PostAuthenticateRequest event handler. However, my Context.Session is null there, so that is also not the way to go.

I've been working on this for a day now and I feel I'm missing something. This shouldn't be too hard to do, right? I'm also a bit confused by all the (semi)related stuff that comes with this. MembershipProvider, MembershipUser, RoleProvider, ProfileProvider, IPrincipal, IIdentity, FormsAuthentication.... Am I the only one who finds all this very confusing?

If someone could tell me a simple, elegant, and efficient solution to store some extra data on a IIdentity without all the extra fuzz.. that would be great! I know there are similar questions on SO but if the answer I need is in there, I must've overlooked.

  • 1
    Hi Domi, it's a combination of only storing data that never changes (like a user ID) or updating the cookie directly after the user changes data that has to be reflected in the cookie right away. If a user does that, I simply update the cookie with the new data. But I try not to store data that changes often. – Razzie Jan 28 '12 at 16:26
  • 24
    this question has 36k views and many upvotes. is this really that common a requirement - and if so isn't there a better way than all this 'custom stuff'? – Simon_Weaver Feb 6 '13 at 12:29
  • 2
    @Simon_Weaver There is ASP.NET Identity know, which supports additional custom information in the encrypted cookie more easily. – John Apr 10 '15 at 11:04
  • 1
    I agree with you, there is to much information like you posted: MemberShip..., Principal, Identity. ASP.NET should make this easier, simpler and at most two approaches for dealing with authentication. – broadband Aug 12 '16 at 16:15
  • 1
    @Simon_Weaver This clearly shows there's demand for simpler easier more flexible identity system IMHO. – niico Apr 15 '17 at 19:08
up vote 799 down vote accepted

Here's how I do it.

I decided to use IPrincipal instead of IIdentity because it means I don't have to implement both IIdentity and IPrincipal.

  1. Create the interface

    interface ICustomPrincipal : IPrincipal
    {
        int Id { get; set; }
        string FirstName { get; set; }
        string LastName { get; set; }
    }
    
  2. CustomPrincipal

    public class CustomPrincipal : ICustomPrincipal
    {
        public IIdentity Identity { get; private set; }
        public bool IsInRole(string role) { return false; }
    
        public CustomPrincipal(string email)
        {
            this.Identity = new GenericIdentity(email);
        }
    
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
    }
    
  3. CustomPrincipalSerializeModel - for serializing custom information into userdata field in FormsAuthenticationTicket object.

    public class CustomPrincipalSerializeModel
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
    }
    
  4. LogIn method - setting up a cookie with custom information

    if (Membership.ValidateUser(viewModel.Email, viewModel.Password))
    {
        var user = userRepository.Users.Where(u => u.Email == viewModel.Email).First();
    
        CustomPrincipalSerializeModel serializeModel = new CustomPrincipalSerializeModel();
        serializeModel.Id = user.Id;
        serializeModel.FirstName = user.FirstName;
        serializeModel.LastName = user.LastName;
    
        JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
    
        string userData = serializer.Serialize(serializeModel);
    
        FormsAuthenticationTicket authTicket = new FormsAuthenticationTicket(
                 1,
                 viewModel.Email,
                 DateTime.Now,
                 DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(15),
                 false,
                 userData);
    
        string encTicket = FormsAuthentication.Encrypt(authTicket);
        HttpCookie faCookie = new HttpCookie(FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName, encTicket);
        Response.Cookies.Add(faCookie);
    
        return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home");
    }
    
  5. Global.asax.cs - Reading cookie and replacing HttpContext.User object, this is done by overriding PostAuthenticateRequest

    protected void Application_PostAuthenticateRequest(Object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        HttpCookie authCookie = Request.Cookies[FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName];
    
        if (authCookie != null)
        {
            FormsAuthenticationTicket authTicket = FormsAuthentication.Decrypt(authCookie.Value);
    
            JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
    
            CustomPrincipalSerializeModel serializeModel = serializer.Deserialize<CustomPrincipalSerializeModel>(authTicket.UserData);
    
            CustomPrincipal newUser = new CustomPrincipal(authTicket.Name);
            newUser.Id = serializeModel.Id;
            newUser.FirstName = serializeModel.FirstName;
            newUser.LastName = serializeModel.LastName;
    
            HttpContext.Current.User = newUser;
        }
    }
    
  6. Access in Razor views

    @((User as CustomPrincipal).Id)
    @((User as CustomPrincipal).FirstName)
    @((User as CustomPrincipal).LastName)
    

and in code:

    (User as CustomPrincipal).Id
    (User as CustomPrincipal).FirstName
    (User as CustomPrincipal).LastName

I think the code is self-explanatory. If it isn't, let me know.

Additionally to make the access even easier you can create a base controller and override the returned User object (HttpContext.User):

public class BaseController : Controller
{
    protected virtual new CustomPrincipal User
    {
        get { return HttpContext.User as CustomPrincipal; }
    }
}

and then, for each controller:

public class AccountController : BaseController
{
    // ...
}

which will allow you to access custom fields in code like this:

User.Id
User.FirstName
User.LastName

But this will not work inside views. For that you would need to create a custom WebViewPage implementation:

public abstract class BaseViewPage : WebViewPage
{
    public virtual new CustomPrincipal User
    {
        get { return base.User as CustomPrincipal; }
    }
}

public abstract class BaseViewPage<TModel> : WebViewPage<TModel>
{
    public virtual new CustomPrincipal User
    {
        get { return base.User as CustomPrincipal; }
    }
}

Make it a default page type in Views/web.config:

<pages pageBaseType="Your.Namespace.BaseViewPage">
  <namespaces>
    <add namespace="System.Web.Mvc" />
    <add namespace="System.Web.Mvc.Ajax" />
    <add namespace="System.Web.Mvc.Html" />
    <add namespace="System.Web.Routing" />
  </namespaces>
</pages>

and in views, you can access it like this:

@User.FirstName
@User.LastName
  • 8
    Nice implementation; watch out for RoleManagerModule replacing your custom principal with a RolePrincipal. That caused me a lot of pain - stackoverflow.com/questions/10742259/… – David Keaveny Jun 26 '12 at 7:29
  • 9
    ok I found the solution, just add an else switch which pass "" (empty string) as the email and the Identity will be anonymous. – Pierre-Alain Vigeant Nov 20 '12 at 22:27
  • 3
    DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(N)... how to make this so it doesn't logout user after N minutes, can the logged in user be persisted (when user check 'Remember Me' for example)? – 1110 Dec 25 '12 at 13:00
  • 4
    If you are using the WebApiController, you will need to set Thread.CurrentPrincipal at Application_PostAuthenticateRequest for it to work as it does not rely on HttpContext.Current.User – Jonathan Levison Jul 16 '13 at 19:50
  • 3
    @AbhinavGujjar FormsAuthentication.SignOut(); works fine for me. – LukeP Jan 29 '14 at 21:30

I can't speak directly for ASP.NET MVC, but for ASP.NET Web Forms, the trick is to create a FormsAuthenticationTicket and encrypt it into a cookie once the user has been authenticated. This way, you only have to call the database once (or AD or whatever you are using to perform your authentication), and each subsequent request will authenticate based on the ticket stored in the cookie.

A good article on this: http://www.ondotnet.com/pub/a/dotnet/2004/02/02/effectiveformsauth.html (broken link)

Edit:

Since the link above is broken, I would recommend LukeP's solution in his answer above: https://stackoverflow.com/a/10524305 - I would also suggest that the accepted answer be changed to that one.

Edit 2: An alternative for the broken link: https://web.archive.org/web/20120422011422/http://ondotnet.com/pub/a/dotnet/2004/02/02/effectiveformsauth.html

  • Right, that was what I needed. Funny enough, I didn't read much about creating your own ticket and passing data. Thanks! – Razzie Jul 1 '09 at 9:36
  • Coming from PHP, I've always put the information like UserID and other pieces needed to grant restricted access in Session. Storing it client-side makes me nervous, can you comment on why that won't be a problem? – John Zumbrum Apr 24 '12 at 12:54
  • 3
    If you are here you should look at LukeP's solution – mynkow Apr 26 '13 at 7:59
  • 2
    I've always been concerned with the potential for exceeding the maximum cookie size (stackoverflow.com/questions/8706924/…) with this approach. I tend to use the Cache as a Session replacement to keep the data on the server. Can anyone tell me if this is a flawed approach? – Red Taz May 8 '13 at 15:14
  • 2
    Nice approach. One potential problem with this is if your user object has more than a few properties (and especially if any nested objects), creating the cookie will fail silently once the encrypted value is over 4KB (much easier to hit then you might think). If you only store key data it's fine but then you'd have to hit DB still for the rest. Another consideration is "upgrading" cookie data when the user object has signature or logic changes. – Geoffrey Hudik Jun 5 '13 at 1:36

Here is an example to get the job done. bool isValid is set by looking at some data store (lets say your user data base). UserID is just an ID i am maintaining. You can add aditional information like email address to user data.

protected void btnLogin_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{         
    //Hard Coded for the moment
    bool isValid=true;
    if (isValid) 
    {
         string userData = String.Empty;
         userData = userData + "UserID=" + userID;
         FormsAuthenticationTicket ticket = new FormsAuthenticationTicket(1, username, DateTime.Now, DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(30), true, userData);
         string encTicket = FormsAuthentication.Encrypt(ticket);
         HttpCookie faCookie = new HttpCookie(FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName, encTicket);
         Response.Cookies.Add(faCookie);
         //And send the user where they were heading
         string redirectUrl = FormsAuthentication.GetRedirectUrl(username, false);
         Response.Redirect(redirectUrl);
     }
}

in the golbal asax add the following code to retrive your information

protected void Application_AuthenticateRequest(Object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    HttpCookie authCookie = Request.Cookies[
             FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName];
    if(authCookie != null)
    {
        //Extract the forms authentication cookie
        FormsAuthenticationTicket authTicket = 
               FormsAuthentication.Decrypt(authCookie.Value);
        // Create an Identity object
        //CustomIdentity implements System.Web.Security.IIdentity
        CustomIdentity id = GetUserIdentity(authTicket.Name);
        //CustomPrincipal implements System.Web.Security.IPrincipal
        CustomPrincipal newUser = new CustomPrincipal();
        Context.User = newUser;
    }
}

When you are going to use the information later, you can access your custom principal as follows.

(CustomPrincipal)this.User
or 
(CustomPrincipal)this.Context.User

this will allow you to access custom user information.

  • 2
    Thanks. I was particularly looking for the FormsAuthenticationTicket. It's easy once you know how! – Razzie Nov 20 '09 at 13:00
  • 2
    FYI -- it's Request.Cookies[] (plural) – Dan Esparza May 20 '10 at 4:27
  • 9
    Don't forget to set Thread.CurrentPrincipal as well as Context.User to the CustomPrincipal. – Russ Cam May 31 '10 at 9:07
  • 6
    Where does GetUserIdentity() come from? – Ryan Mar 12 '11 at 7:03
  • Ditto that question - where does GetUserIdentity() come from? – sydneyos Jan 27 '12 at 22:01

MVC provides you with the OnAuthorize method that hangs from your controller classes. Or, you could use a custom action filter to perform authorization. MVC makes it pretty easy to do. I posted a blog post about this here. http://www.bradygaster.com/post/custom-authentication-with-mvc-3.0

  • But session can be lost and user still authenticate. No ? – Dragouf Aug 18 '11 at 12:46
  • @brady gaster, I read your blog post(thanks!), Why would someone use the override "OnAuthorize()" as mentioned on your post over the global.asax entry "...AuthenticateRequest(..)" mentioned by the other answers? Is one preferred over the other in setting the principle user? – RayLoveless Apr 11 '16 at 18:01

Here is a solution if you need to hook up some methods to @User for use in your views. No solution for any serious membership customization, but if the original question was needed for views alone then this perhaps would be enough. The below was used for checking a variable returned from a authorizefilter, used to verify if some links wehere to be presented or not(not for any kind of authorization logic or access granting).

using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Web;
    using System.Security.Principal;

    namespace SomeSite.Web.Helpers
    {
        public static class UserHelpers
        {
            public static bool IsEditor(this IPrincipal user)
            {
                return null; //Do some stuff
            }
        }
    }

Then just add a reference in the areas web.config, and call it like below in the view.

@User.IsEditor()
  • In your solution, We again need to do database calls every time. Because user object doesn't have custom properties. It only has Name and IsAuthanticated – oneNiceFriend Jun 5 '16 at 8:36
  • That depends entirely on your implementation and desired behavior. My sample contains 0 lines of database, or role, logic. If one use the IsInRole it could in turn be cached in cookie i believe. Or you implement your own caching logic. – Baseless Jun 5 '16 at 14:03

Based on LukeP's answer, and add some methods to setup timeout and requireSSL cooperated with Web.config.

The references links

Modified Codes of LukeP

1, Set timeout based on Web.Config. The FormsAuthentication.Timeout will get the timeout value, which is defined in web.config. I wrapped the followings to be a function, which return a ticket back.

int version = 1;
DateTime now = DateTime.Now;

// respect to the `timeout` in Web.config.
TimeSpan timeout = FormsAuthentication.Timeout;
DateTime expire = now.Add(timeout);
bool isPersist = false;

FormsAuthenticationTicket ticket = new FormsAuthenticationTicket(
     version,          
     name,
     now,
     expire,
     isPersist,
     userData);

2, Configure the cookie to be secure or not, based on the RequireSSL configuration.

HttpCookie faCookie = new HttpCookie(FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName, encTicket);
// respect to `RequreSSL` in `Web.Config`
bool bSSL = FormsAuthentication.RequireSSL;
faCookie.Secure = bSSL;

All right, so i'm a serious cryptkeeper here by dragging up this very old question, but there is a much simpler approach to this, which was touched on by @Baserz above. And that is to use a combination of C# Extension methods and caching (Do NOT use session).

In fact, Microsoft has already provided a number of such extensions in the Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.IdentityExtensions namespace. For instance, GetUserId() is an extension method that returns the user Id. There is also GetUserName() and FindFirstValue(), which returns claims based on the IPrincipal.

So you need only include the namespace, and then call User.Identity.GetUserName() to get the users name as configured by ASP.NET Identity.

I'm not certain if this is cached, since the older ASP.NET Identity is not open sourced, and I haven't bothered to reverse engineer it. However, if it's not then you can write your own extension method, that will cache this result for a specific amount of time.

  • Why "do not use session"? – Alex Jun 8 '17 at 19:31
  • @jitbit - because session is unreliable, and insecure. For the same reason you should never use session for security purposes. – Erik Funkenbusch Jun 8 '17 at 19:42
  • "Unreliable" can be addressed by repopulating session (if empty). "Unsecure" - there are ways to protect from session hijacking (by useing HTTPS-only + other ways). But I actually agree with you. Where would you cache it then? Info like IsUserAdministrator or UserEmail etc.? You thinking HttpRuntime.Cache? – Alex Jun 8 '17 at 19:58
  • @jitbit - That's one option, or another cacheing solution if you have it. Making sure to expire the cache entry after a period of time. Insecure also applies to the local system, since you can manually alter the cookie and guess session ID's. Man in the middle is not the only concern. – Erik Funkenbusch Jun 8 '17 at 20:11

As an addition to LukeP code for Web Forms users (not MVC) if you want to simplify the access in the code behind of your pages, just add the code below to a base page and derive the base page in all your pages:

Public Overridable Shadows ReadOnly Property User() As CustomPrincipal
    Get
        Return DirectCast(MyBase.User, CustomPrincipal)
    End Get
End Property

So in your code behind you can simply access:

User.FirstName or User.LastName

What I'm missing in a Web Form scenario, is how to obtain the same behaviour in code not tied to the page, for example in httpmodules should I always add a cast in each class or is there a smarter way to obtain this?

Thanks for your answers and thank to LukeP since I used your examples as a base for my custom user (which now has User.Roles, User.Tasks, User.HasPath(int) , User.Settings.Timeout and many other nice things)

I tried the solution suggested by LukeP and found that it doesn't support the Authorize attribute. So, I modified it a bit.

public class UserExBusinessInfo
{
    public int BusinessID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class UserExInfo
{
    public IEnumerable<UserExBusinessInfo> BusinessInfo { get; set; }
    public int? CurrentBusinessID { get; set; }
}

public class PrincipalEx : ClaimsPrincipal
{
    private readonly UserExInfo userExInfo;
    public UserExInfo UserExInfo => userExInfo;

    public PrincipalEx(IPrincipal baseModel, UserExInfo userExInfo)
        : base(baseModel)
    {
        this.userExInfo = userExInfo;
    }
}

public class PrincipalExSerializeModel
{
    public UserExInfo UserExInfo { get; set; }
}

public static class IPrincipalHelpers
{
    public static UserExInfo ExInfo(this IPrincipal @this) => (@this as PrincipalEx)?.UserExInfo;
}


    [HttpPost]
    [AllowAnonymous]
    [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
    public async Task<ActionResult> Login(LoginModel details, string returnUrl)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            AppUser user = await UserManager.FindAsync(details.Name, details.Password);

            if (user == null)
            {
                ModelState.AddModelError("", "Invalid name or password.");
            }
            else
            {
                ClaimsIdentity ident = await UserManager.CreateIdentityAsync(user, DefaultAuthenticationTypes.ApplicationCookie);
                AuthManager.SignOut();
                AuthManager.SignIn(new AuthenticationProperties { IsPersistent = false }, ident);

                user.LastLoginDate = DateTime.UtcNow;
                await UserManager.UpdateAsync(user);

                PrincipalExSerializeModel serializeModel = new PrincipalExSerializeModel();
                serializeModel.UserExInfo = new UserExInfo()
                {
                    BusinessInfo = await
                        db.Businesses
                        .Where(b => user.Id.Equals(b.AspNetUserID))
                        .Select(b => new UserExBusinessInfo { BusinessID = b.BusinessID, Name = b.Name })
                        .ToListAsync()
                };

                JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();

                string userData = serializer.Serialize(serializeModel);

                FormsAuthenticationTicket authTicket = new FormsAuthenticationTicket(
                         1,
                         details.Name,
                         DateTime.Now,
                         DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(15),
                         false,
                         userData);

                string encTicket = FormsAuthentication.Encrypt(authTicket);
                HttpCookie faCookie = new HttpCookie(FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName, encTicket);
                Response.Cookies.Add(faCookie);

                return RedirectToLocal(returnUrl);
            }
        }
        return View(details);
    }

And finally in Global.asax.cs

    protected void Application_PostAuthenticateRequest(Object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        HttpCookie authCookie = Request.Cookies[FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName];

        if (authCookie != null)
        {
            FormsAuthenticationTicket authTicket = FormsAuthentication.Decrypt(authCookie.Value);
            JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            PrincipalExSerializeModel serializeModel = serializer.Deserialize<PrincipalExSerializeModel>(authTicket.UserData);
            PrincipalEx newUser = new PrincipalEx(HttpContext.Current.User, serializeModel.UserExInfo);
            HttpContext.Current.User = newUser;
        }
    }

Now I can access the data in views and controllers simply by calling

User.ExInfo()

To log out I just call

AuthManager.SignOut();

where AuthManager is

HttpContext.GetOwinContext().Authentication

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