402

I'm trying:

SELECT * 
FROM dbo.March2010 A
WHERE A.Date >= 2010-04-01;

A.Date looks like: 2010-03-04 00:00:00.000

However, this is not working.

Can anyone provide a reference for why?

2
  • 25
    put single quotes around it May 17 '12 at 20:57
  • 4
    In addition to quotes, I recommend always using a safe and unambiguous format for date-only string literals. The only one I trust is YYYYMMDD. See my comment to David's answer for the reason why... May 17 '12 at 21:06
557
select *  
from dbo.March2010 A 
where A.Date >= Convert(datetime, '2010-04-01' )

In your query, 2010-4-01 is treated as a mathematical expression, so in essence it read

select *  
from dbo.March2010 A 
where A.Date >= 2005; 

(2010 minus 4 minus 1 is 2005 Converting it to a proper datetime, and using single quotes will fix this issue.)

Technically, the parser might allow you to get away with

select *  
from dbo.March2010 A 
where A.Date >= '2010-04-01'

it will do the conversion for you, but in my opinion it is less readable than explicitly converting to a DateTime for the maintenance programmer that will come after you.

5
  • 40
    The explicit convert is not necessary. Also I highly recommend using YYYYMMDD instead of YYYY-MM-DD. Why? Well, try your code with SET LANGUAGE FRENCH. :-) For that date you'll get January 4 instead of April 1. For other dates you might get an error instead. May 17 '12 at 21:05
  • 5
    @Aaron Bertrant - My answer did include that the conversion isn't necessary, starting with "Techically, the pareser might let you get away with <final code sample>. I just find it more readable, because it's strikingly obvious that this is a date-time. Too many Database Systems store date values in a varchar field, but you're right about the format. Normally, when using conversion I add in the format specifier as well, but I was doing my sample off the top of my head.
    – David
    May 17 '12 at 21:09
  • 2
    @AaronBertrand, I had to use your suggestion in conjuction with the above answer: CONVERT(datetime, '20100401 10:01:01') - passing 2010-04-01 works in SQL Server Management Studio but not when sending the SQL statement via PHP/MSSQL.
    – paperclip
    Aug 30 '13 at 15:21
  • 1
    I think it's clear enough that this is a date, and thus conversion is not necessary. May 22 '18 at 16:37
  • I wasn't able to use the Convert(datetime, '2010-04-01' ) in BigQuery . If anyone looking to execute greater than date function in BigQuery , you can follow the answer mentioned in the link below link
    – Raxy
    Jun 11 at 19:15
67

Try enclosing your date into a character string.

 select * 
 from dbo.March2010 A
 where A.Date >= '2010-04-01';
1
  • 2
    Adding time will give exact result : where A.Date >= 2014-01-12 12:28:00
    – Shaiju T
    Mar 4 '15 at 9:42
20

We can use like below as well

SELECT * 
FROM dbo.March2010 A
WHERE CAST(A.Date AS Date) >= '2017-03-22';

SELECT * 
    FROM dbo.March2010 A
    WHERE CAST(A.Date AS Datetime) >= '2017-03-22 06:49:53.840';
1
  • 3
    Modifying the filter predicate column is not a good idea whatsoever. It prevents index usage almost entirely.
    – pim
    May 31 '17 at 17:09
8

To sum it all up, the correct answer is :

select * from db where Date >= '20100401'  (Format of date yyyymmdd)

This will avoid any problem with other language systems and will use the index.

3
DateTime start1 = DateTime.Parse(txtDate.Text);

SELECT * 
FROM dbo.March2010 A
WHERE A.Date >= start1;

First convert TexBox into the Datetime then....use that variable into the Query

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