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Not having much experience at all writing loops, I'm looking to automate (with a loop) something I do frequently with all new datasets: create boxplots and histograms of each variable, as well as calculate descriptive statistics, for the latter, I tend to use both describe (Hmisc) and/or stats (fileds).

Ideally, I'd like to have the loop produce one boxplot for each appropriate variable. My loop below produces only one boxplot and returns the error:

Error: no function to return from, jumping to top level

What am I getting wrong? Also, if anyone could point me to a reference/website that may straighten out my insufficient loop-writing ways, I'd love the help.

Thanks! Chris

y <- LETTERS[as.integer(rnorm(100, mean=5, sd=1))]
z <- LETTERS[as.integer(rnorm(100, mean=10, sd=1))]
x <- round(rnorm(100, mean=5, sd=2.5),2)
data <- as.data.frame(cbind(x,y,z))


A<- do.call("cbind", lapply(data, class))
B<- as.vector( A[1,])
C <- grep("character|factor", B)

for (i in 1:length(C)) {
  x <- C[i]
  counti <- table(data[,x])
  y <- barplot(counti, main=paste("Barplot for var", x))
  return(y)}
  • Why you add return(y) to you for loop? Remove it and your loop will work like expected. – sgibb May 17 '12 at 21:39
  • 1
    I would point you to the R Inferno to help get a handle on avoiding loops. And toward ggplot2 and specifically facet_wrap for this kind of plotting. – Justin May 17 '12 at 21:48
  • Excellent point Justin. I don't think the 1:length(C) is necessary, just pass the C directly as I did. Then you can get rid of x <- C[i] and anywhere else you have x replace it with i – Tyler Rinker May 17 '12 at 21:53
2

You can not use "return" in the loop, it is used in functions. Also you might want to make pauses between plots:

par(ask=T)
for (i in 1:length(C)) {
  x <- C[i]
  counti <- table(data[,x])
  y <- barplot(counti, main=paste("Barplot for var", x))
  y
}
2

The first thing you should unlearn is the as.data.frame(cbind()) mistake. It forces all the columns to be of the same class, thereby defeating any benefits of the dataframe structure.

sapply(data, class)
       x        y        z 
"factor" "factor" "factor"

It's also going to be simpler to just use A<- sapply(data, class) as above and get a vector instead of that tortured pass through cbind. And as others have mentioned return works for regular functions but not inside a for-loop. If you were going to do it with a for-loop, you need to have a structure to gather the results of the barplot calls and a list is the natural one because you cannot be sure they will all be the same length. This might be an alternate route:

y <- LETTERS[as.integer(rnorm(100, mean=5, sd=1))]
z <- LETTERS[as.integer(rnorm(100, mean=10, sd=1))]
x <- round(rnorm(100, mean=5, sd=2.5),2)
data <- data.frame(x=x,y=y,z=z)
CC <- grep("character|factor", sapply(data, class))
y <- list()
 for (i in seq_along(CC) ) {
   x <- CC[i]
   counti <- table(data[,x]) 
   y <- c(y, list(barplot( counti, main=paste("Barplot for var", x))))
   }
 y
#------------    
[[1]]
     [,1]
[1,]  0.7
[2,]  1.9
[3,]  3.1
[4,]  4.3
[5,]  5.5
[6,]  6.7

[[2]]
     [,1]
[1,]  0.7
[2,]  1.9
[3,]  3.1
[4,]  4.3
[5,]  5.5
[6,]  6.7
  • Many thanks for the most excellent guidance on form! As someone who is about 8 months into my personal journey with R, I can certainly use the advice. – Chris May 17 '12 at 23:56
  • If you can remember who taught you to use as.data.frame(cbind()) , I'd like to know so I can put a stop to it. It keeps appearing and seems to be increasing in prevalence. – 42- May 18 '12 at 0:27
  • @DWin I think it's kinda intuitive to paste things together and then turn it into a data frame if you think of cbind as an action and data.frame as an attribute. I remember making the same mistake myself starting out with R. It's intuition I think you're confronting, the only way to change it is to do exactly what you' just did...inform people. : ) – Tyler Rinker May 18 '12 at 1:11
1

I think something with lapply may be nicer:

C <- grep("character|factor", B)

FUN <- function(vec, num){
  if (dev.interactive()) dev.new()
  counti <- table(vec)
  y <- barplot(counti, main=paste("Barplot for var", num))
  return(y)
}

lapply(C, function(i) FUN(data[, i], i))

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