927

Is it possible to make a CSS class that "inherits" from another CSS class (or more than one).

For example, say we had:

.something { display:inline }
.else      { background:red }

What I'd like to do is something like this:

.composite 
{
   .something;
   .else
}

where the ".composite" class would both display inline and have a red background

1
  • 4
    think more about cascading rather than inheritance, it doesn't apply here
    – blu
    Commented Jun 30, 2009 at 19:15

29 Answers 29

504

There are tools like LESS, which allow you to compose CSS at a higher level of abstraction similar to what you describe.

Less calls these "Mixins"

Instead of

/* CSS */
#header {
  -moz-border-radius: 8px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 8px;
  border-radius: 8px;
}

#footer {
  -moz-border-radius: 8px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 8px;
  border-radius: 8px;
}

You could say

/* LESS */
.rounded_corners {
  -moz-border-radius: 8px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 8px;
  border-radius: 8px;
}

#header {
  .rounded_corners;
}

#footer {
  .rounded_corners;
}
4
  • 6
    You're adding a lot of technical debt for very little benefit. Like buying a robot to fold your laundry.
    – Jay Brunet
    Commented Jul 23, 2023 at 3:37
  • 7
    @PJBrunet a very subjective statement, especially when you consider that you're commenting on a 2009 answer in 2023 (why?). There are other justifications for this, too. Besides, SCSS/LESS are typically translated into normal CSS before they are uploaded to the server. Commented Oct 24, 2023 at 21:03
  • @PJBrunet Technical debt can be measured in efficiency. Buying a vacuum cleaner to sweep your floors was unheard of before 1900.
    – Suncat2000
    Commented Feb 14 at 13:12
  • "adding a lot of technical debt for very little benefit" -> modern web development in a nutshell, 500 compilers and dependencies to render a h1..
    – Noah
    Commented Apr 18 at 12:42
395

You can add multiple classes to a single DOM element, e.g.

<div class="firstClass secondClass thirdclass fourthclass"></div>

Rules given in later classes (or which are more specific) override. So the fourthclass in that example kind of prevails.

Inheritance is not part of the CSS standard.

2
  • 13
    do you know if which class prevail, the last ones or the 1st ones and is the behaviour cross browser safe? Let's say we have .firstClass {font-size:12px;} .secondClass {font-size:20px;} will then final font-size be 12px or 20px and is this cross browser safe? Commented Feb 23, 2012 at 19:17
  • 32
    The rule with the highest specificity on the selector will win. Standard specificity rules apply; in your example, since "first" and "second" have the same specificity, the rule declared later in the CSS will win. Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 3:31
145

Yes, but not exactly with that syntax.

.composite,
.something { display:inline }

.composite,
.else      { background:red }
5
  • 32
    Because if the .something and the .else classes are in different files and that you cannot modify them, then you're stuck. Commented Mar 25, 2014 at 8:15
  • 1
    Other drawback of this solution, though it's quite nice as a puzzle solution that the hole CSS code could quickly became intractable, because one can't organize classes logically e.g. we want .else's and .something's definition to place into quite other groups of CSS definitions.
    – Geeocode
    Commented Jun 26, 2018 at 15:07
  • 4
    this is not inheritance in any way - you just applied display:inline for both composite and something and applied background:red for both else and composite. composite did not inherit anything - this is not the answer. Commented Apr 16, 2020 at 20:32
  • Agree with @EliavLouski. This is not inheritance. An element will need to use both the classes - composite and something/else for this to work. With inheritance only a single class should be used.
    – chetan
    Commented Oct 31, 2021 at 11:38
  • It's a good answer, but for clarity I recommend you remove .something which is not really necessary to understand the concept.
    – Jay Brunet
    Commented Jul 23, 2023 at 3:33
102

Keep your common attributes together and assign specific (or override) attributes again.

/*  ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ */   
/*  Headings */ 
/*  ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ */   
h1, h2, h3, h4
{
    font-family         : myfind-bold;
    color               : #4C4C4C;
    display:inline-block;
    width:900px;
    text-align:left;
    background-image: linear-gradient(0,   #F4F4F4, #FEFEFE);/* IE6 & IE7 */
}

h1  
{
    font-size           : 300%;
    padding             : 45px 40px 45px 0px;
}

h2
{
    font-size           : 200%;
    padding             : 30px 25px 30px 0px;
}
2
  • I wanted to comment that this is precisely the approach used by w3 in their recommended default html style sheet: [w3 CSS2]: w3.org/TR/CSS2/sample.html. I'm also trying to get a grip on how to organize css code, and it seems like the paradigm is inverted compared to typical object-oriented inheritance: you use classes (or, more generally selectors) to specify which elements inherit which attributes, but you inherit attributes (at least, this is how the hierarchy can most easily exist logically), then override attributes at the more specific selectors when necessary. Commented Oct 7, 2019 at 7:02
  • 1
    FYI on my downvote: this is normal CSS using element selectors, it doesn't use a single CSS class. I don't want to be rude, but just FYI that my reading of this answer should not be called an example of class inheritance. If the goal was to teach basic CSS principals I would upvote, but it is not an answer the OP question, so downvote.
    – yzorg
    Commented Jun 26, 2020 at 16:54
61

The SCSS way for the given example, would be something like:

.something {
  display: inline
}
.else {
  background: red
}

.composite {
  @extend .something;
  @extend .else;
}

More info, check the sass basics

2
  • What is the added value compared to this? .composite,.something { display:inline } and .composite,.else { background:red } Commented Sep 11, 2015 at 19:58
  • 4
    @PavelGatnar You could reuse the definitions of .something and .else in another css definitions. Commented Sep 14, 2015 at 18:24
59

An element can take multiple classes:

.classOne { font-weight: bold; }
.classTwo { font-famiy:  verdana; }

<div class="classOne classTwo">
  <p>I'm bold and verdana.</p>
</div>

And that's about as close as you're going to get unfortunately. I'd love to see this feature, along with class-aliases someday.

0
51

No you can't do something like

.composite 
{
   .something;
   .else
}

This are no "class" names in the OO sense. .something and .else are just selectors nothing more.

But you can either specify two classes on an element

<div class="something else">...</div>

or you might look into another form of inheritance

.foo {
  background-color: white;
  color: black;
}

.bar {
  background-color: inherit;
  color: inherit;
  font-weight: normal;
}
<div class="foo">
  <p class="bar">Hello, world</p>
</div>

Where the paragraphs backgroundcolor and color are inherited from the settings in the enclosing div which is .foo styled. You might have to check the exact W3C specification. inherit is default for most properties anyway but not for all.

1
  • 3
    yup, this (first part) was my expectation when i first heard of CSS back in 20th century... and we still do not have it, they are burning performance on some dynamic things while this can be static composed just before the css apply and it replaces the need of variables (static "variables")
    – neu-rah
    Commented Jan 4, 2017 at 19:23
32

I ran into this same problem and ended up using a JQuery solution to make it seem like a class can inherit other classes.

<script>
    $(function(){
            $(".composite").addClass("something else");
        });
</script>

This will find all elements with the class "composite" and add the classes "something" and "else" to the elements. So something like <div class="composite">...</div> will end up like so:
<div class="composite something else">...</div>

1
  • 2
    The problem with this solution is that applies to all the existing controls, if you create the control after this call, it won't have the new class. Commented Sep 2, 2019 at 23:58
28

You can do is this

CSS

.car {
  font-weight: bold;
}
.benz {
  background-color: blue;
}
.toyota {
  background-color: white;
}

HTML

<div class="car benz">
  <p>I'm bold and blue.</p>
</div>
<div class="car toyota">
  <p>I'm bold and white.</p>
</div>
14

You can use the converse approach to achieve the same result - start from the composite and then remove styling using the unset keyword. For example, if you start with the following sample composition:

.composite {
    color: red;
    margin-left: 50px;
    background-color: green
}

you can then increase selector specificity to selectively remove styles using unset:

.composite.no-color {
    color: unset
}

.composite.no-margin-left {
    margin-left: unset
}

.composite.no-background-color {
    background-color: unset
}

Here is a JSFiddle demonstrating this approach.

One benefit of this approach is that because the specificity of the compound selectors is higher than the composite itself, you do not need all of the combinations of classes to achieve the desired results for multiple combinations:

/* Multi-unset compound selector combinations, such as the one that follows, ARE NOT NECESSARY because of the higher specificity of each individual compound selectors listed above. This keeps things simple. */
.composite.no-background-color.no-color.no-margin-left {
    background-color: unset;
    color: unset;
    margin-left: unset
}

Furthermore, at 96% support for the unset keyword, browser coverage is excellent.

1
  • I think this is the best answer by far It could be improved specifying the element type at the beginning e.g. div.composite.no-background-color.no-color.no-margin-left {...} Commented Apr 3, 2021 at 19:07
13

Don't forget:

div.something.else {

    // will only style a div with both, not just one or the other

}
0
9

You can do this with Less, a Ruby library that, among other, things does this:

Since super looks just like footer, but with a different font, I'll use Less's class inclusion technique (they call it a mixin) to tell it to include these declarations too:

#super {
  #footer;
  font-family: cursive;
}
0
7

In Css file:

p.Title 
{
  font-family: Arial;
  font-size: 16px;
}

p.SubTitle p.Title
{
   font-size: 12px;
}
4
  • 2
    So what will be the resulting font-size? Commented Dec 18, 2011 at 19:02
  • The font size would be 12px for "p.Title" because it is defined after the first one in the file. it overrides the first font-size.
    – YWE
    Commented Mar 23, 2012 at 14:14
  • @YWE: Does that mean the declarations should actually be the other way round compared to what is written in this answer (at least if we want to example to be illustrative)? If the last one defined prevails, the font-size: 16px can never take effect, right? Commented Aug 29, 2015 at 11:38
  • @O.R.Mapper - typically what happens is that the first declaration is in a common css file, that is shared by multiple pages. Then the second declaration is in a second css file, used only on certain pages. And imported after the common css file. So those pages use the "last seen" value of 12px. Commented Oct 31, 2019 at 15:49
6

Unfortunately, CSS does not provide 'inheritance' in the way that programming languages like C++, C# or Java do. You can't declare a CSS class an then extend it with another CSS class.

However, you can apply more than a single class to an tag in your markup ... in which case there is a sophisticated set of rules that determine which actual styles will get applied by the browser.

<span class="styleA styleB"> ... </span>

CSS will look for all the styles that can be applied based on what your markup, and combine the CSS styles from those multiple rules together.

Typically, the styles are merged, but when conflicts arise, the later declared style will generally win (unless the !important attribute is specified on one of the styles, in which case that wins). Also, styles applied directly to an HTML element take precedence over CSS class styles.

0
6

I realize this question is now very old but, here goes nothin!

If the intent is to add a single class that implies the properties of multiple classes, as a native solution, I would recommend using JavaScript/jQuery (jQuery is really not necessary but certainly useful)

If you have, for instance .umbrellaClass that "inherits" from .baseClass1 and .baseClass2 you could have some JavaScript that fires on ready.

$(".umbrellaClass").addClass("baseClass1");
$(".umbrellaClass").addClass("baseClass2");

Now all elements of .umbrellaClass will have all the properties of both .baseClasss. Note that, like OOP inheritance, .umbrellaClass may or may not have its own properties.

The only caveat here is to consider whether there are elements being dynamically created that won't exist when this code fires, but there are simple ways around that as well.

Sucks css doesn't have native inheritance, though.

2
  • 2
    This approach has already been suggested in @DHoover's answer from 2013.
    – Bryan
    Commented Nov 18, 2016 at 14:18
  • Needs the plain JavaScript code. It is possible to locate and extract class rules from a library stylesheet and append them to another library or custom stylesheet or rule, but there doesn't seem to be an example on the Web and the code to do it right is a bit complex. I could not design a function to merge class rules after about an hour of work. Commented Apr 18, 2021 at 17:27
6

Don't think of css classes as object oriented classes, think of them as merely a tool among other selectors to specify which attribute classes an html element is styled by. Think of everything between the braces as the attribute class, and selectors on the left-hand side tell the elements they select to inherit attributes from the attribute class. Example:

.foo, .bar { font-weight : bold; font-size : 2em; /* attribute class A */}
.foo { color : green; /* attribute class B */}

When an element is given the attribute class="foo", it is useful to think of it not as inheriting attributes from class .foo, but from attribute class A and attribute class B. I.e., the inheritance graph is one level deep, with elements deriving from attribute classes, and the selectors specifying where the edges go, and determining precedence when there are competing attributes (similar to method resolution order).

enter image description here

The practical implication for programming is this. Say you have the style sheet given above, and want to add a new class .baz, where it should have the same font-size as .foo. The naive solution would be this:

.foo, .bar { font-weight : bold; font-size : 2em; /* attribute class A */}
.foo { color : green; /* attribute class B */}
.baz { font-size : 2em; /* attribute class C, hidden dependency! */}

enter image description here

Any time I have to type something twice I get so mad! Not only do I have to write it twice, now I have no way of programatically indicating that .foo and .baz should have the same font-size, and I've created a hidden dependency! My above paradigm would suggest that I should abstract out the font-size attribute from attribute class A:

.foo, .bar, .baz { font-size : 2em; /* attribute base class for A */}
.foo, .bar { font-weight : bold; /* attribute class A */}
.foo { color : green; /* attribute class B */}

enter image description here

The main complaint here is that now I have to retype every selector from attribute class A again to specify that the elements they should select should also inherit attributes from attribute base class A. Still, the alternatives are to have to remember to edit every attribute class where there are hidden dependencies each time something changes, or to use a third party tool. The first option makes god laugh, the second makes me want to kill myself.

5

That's not possible in CSS.

The only thing supported in CSS is being more specific than another rule:

span { display:inline }
span.myclass { background: red }

A span with class "myclass" will have both properties.

Another way is by specifying two classes:

<div class="something else">...</div>

The style of "else" will override (or add) the style of "something"

1
  • For all styles in 1 file there is an inheritance-like solution in CSS, see my post. Commented Sep 11, 2015 at 20:01
3

As others have said, you can add multiple classes to an element.

But that's not really the point. I get your question about inheritance. The real point is that inheritance in CSS is done not through classes, but through element hierarchies. So to model inherited traits you need to apply them to different levels of elements in the DOM.

1
  • It is better to create inheritance-like CSS definitions instead of using all the composition class chain, see my post. Commented Sep 11, 2015 at 20:06
3

While direct inheritance isn't possible.

It is possible to use a class (or id) for a parent tag and then use CSS combinators to alter child tag behaviour from it's heirarchy.

p.test{background-color:rgba(55,55,55,0.1);}
p.test > span{background-color:rgba(55,55,55,0.1);}
p.test > span > span{background-color:rgba(55,55,55,0.1);}
p.test > span > span > span{background-color:rgba(55,55,55,0.1);}
p.test > span > span > span > span{background-color:rgba(55,55,55,0.1);}
p.test > span > span > span > span > span{background-color:rgba(55,55,55,0.1);}
p.test > span > span > span > span > span > span{background-color:rgba(55,55,55,0.1);}
p.test > span > span > span > span > span > span > span{background-color:rgba(55,55,55,0.1);}
p.test > span > span > span > span > span > span > span > span{background-color:rgba(55,55,55,0.1);}
<p class="test"><span>One <span>possible <span>solution <span>is <span>using <span>multiple <span>nested <span>tags</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p>

I wouldn't suggest using so many spans like the example, however it's just a proof of concept. There are still many bugs that can arise when trying to apply CSS in this manner. (For example altering text-decoration types).

2

I was looking for that like crazy too and I just figured it out by trying different things :P... Well you can do it like that:

composite.something, composite.else
{
    blblalba
}

It suddenly worked for me :)

1
  • Doesn't work if some of the classes are in a fixed library file. Commented Apr 18, 2021 at 15:33
2

In specific circumstances you can do a "soft" inheritance:

.composite
{
display:inherit;
background:inherit;
}

.something { display:inline }
.else      { background:red }

This only works if you are adding the .composite class to a child element. It is "soft" inheritance because any values not specified in .composite are not inherited obviously. Keep in mind it would still be less characters to simply write "inline" and "red" instead of "inherit".

Here is a list of properties and whether or not they do this automatically: https://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/propidx.html

2

Less and Sass are CSS pre-processors which extend CSS language in valuable ways. Just one of many improvements they offer is just the option you're looking for. There are some very good answers with Less and I will add Sass solution.

Sass has extend option which allows one class to be fully extended to another one. More about extend you can read in this article

2

I think this one is a better solution:

[class*=“button-“] {
  /* base button properties */
}
.button-primary { ... }
.button-plain { ... }
1
  • 1
    More on this technique at coderwall.com/p/lqjd1w/css-class-inheritance-in-css. A comment there was critical of performance. Any good blog posts on performance impact? (Good or bad welcome.) My user base is mostly desktop (80%) and some high-end phones (5%) and iPad (5%), so if performance is "OK" on desktop browsers I might stick with this method over adopting LESS/SASS for CSS class inheritance.
    – yzorg
    Commented Jun 26, 2020 at 16:10
1

Actually what you're asking for exists - however it's done as add-on modules. Check out this question on Better CSS in .NET for examples.

Check out Larsenal's answer on using LESS to get an idea of what these add-ons do.

1

CSS doesn't really do what you're asking. If you want to write rules with that composite idea in mind, you may want to check out compass. It's a stylesheet framework which looks similar to the already mentioned Less.

It lets you do mixins and all that good business.

1
  • Adding more details to above, Compass aka Sass does via Extend, PlaceHolders Mixins vs Extend , more detailed information about PlaceHolders
    – Abhijeet
    Commented Jan 18, 2016 at 3:04
1

For those who are not satisfied with the mentioned (excellent) posts, you can use your programming skills to make a variable (PHP or whichever) and have it store the multiple class names.

That's the best hack I could come up with.

<style>
.red { color: red; }
.bold { font-weight: bold; }
</style>

<? define('DANGERTEXT','red bold'); ?>

Then apply the global variable to the element you desire rather than the class names themselves

<span class="<?=DANGERTEXT?>"> Le Champion est Ici </span>
1

Have a look at CSS compose: https://bambielli.com/til/2017-08-11-css-modules-composes/

according to them:

.serif-font {
    font-family: Georgia, serif;
}

.display {
    composes: serif-font;
    font-size: 30px;
    line-height: 35px;
}

I use it in my react project.

-1

If you want a more powerful text preprocessor than LESS, check out PPWizard:

http://dennisbareis.com/ppwizard.htm

Warning the website is truly hideous and there's a small learning curve, but it's perfect for building both CSS and HTML code via macros. I've never understood why more web coders don't use it.

0
-8

You can achieve what you want if you preprocess your .css files through php. ...

$something='color:red;'
$else='display:inline;';
echo '.something {'. $something .'}';
echo '.else {'. $something .'}';
echo '.somethingelse {'. $something  .$else '}';

...

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