81

This question already has an answer here:

I have dictionary:

var driversCounter = {
 "one": 1, 
 "two": 2, 
 "three": 3, 
 "four": 4, 
 "five": 5
}

Now, I need to show it in dropdownlist. How to get collection of keys in my dictionary?

marked as duplicate by Community May 15 '17 at 10:21

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10 Answers 10

126

Use Object.keys() or shim it in older browsers...

const keys = Object.keys(driversCounter);

If you wanted values, there is Object.values() and if you want key and value, you can use Object.entries(), often paired with Array.prototype.forEach() like this...

Object.entries(driversCounter).forEach(([key, value]) => {
   console.log(key, value);
});

Alternatively, considering your use case, maybe this will do it...

var selectBox, option, prop;

selectBox = document.getElementById("drivers");

for (prop in driversCounter) {
   option = document.createElement("option");
   option.textContent = prop;
   option.value = driversCounter[prop];
   selectBox.add(option);
}
  • 1
    dict.hasOwnProperty(key) – MUY Belgium May 9 '17 at 13:52
54

One option is using Object.keys():

Object.keys(driversCounter)

It works fine for modern browsers (however, IE supports it starting from version 9 only).

To add compatible support you can copy the code snippet provided in MDN.

  • 1
    Most usable answer here! – securecurve Apr 17 '15 at 19:14
19

to loop through the "dictionary" (we call it object in JS), use a for in loop:

for(var key in driversCounter) {
    if(driversCounter.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
        //key                 = keys,  left of the ":"
        //driversCounter[key] = value, right of the ":"
    }
}
9

This will work in all JavaScript implementations:

var keys = [];

for (var key in driversCounter) {
    if (driversCounter.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
        keys.push(key);
    }
}

Like others mentioned before you may use Object.keys, but it may not work in older engines. So you can use the following monkey patch:

if (!Object.keys) {
    Object.keys = function (object) {
        var keys = [];

        for (var key in object) {
            if (object.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                keys.push(key);
            }
        }
    }
}
5

use Object.Keys()

var driversCounter = {
                      "one": 1,
                      "two": 2,
                      "three": 3,
                      "four": 4,
                      "five": 5
                     }
console.log(Object.keys(driversCounter));

3

With a modern JS engine you can use Object.keys(driversCounter)

3

for new browsers: Object.keys( MY_DICTIONARY ) will return an array of keys. Else you may want to go the old school way:

var keys = []
for(var key in dic) keys.push( key );
  • prefer Joseph's answer for the so called old-school way – Parth Thakkar May 18 '12 at 15:01
  • Incomplete due to possible prototyping. – Niet the Dark Absol May 18 '12 at 15:02
  • that's why when i saw joseph's answer, i remembered that...and instead of editing it, i just told to prefer his answer, didn't i? – Parth Thakkar May 18 '12 at 15:04
  • duh. Misread what you said. Sorry 'bout that. – Niet the Dark Absol May 18 '12 at 15:04
1

As others have said, you could use Object.keys(), but who cares about older browsers, right?

Well, I do.

Try this. array_keys from PHPJS ports PHP's handy array_keys function so it can be used in JS. At a glance, it uses Object.keys if supported, but handles the case where it isn't very easily. It even includes filtering the keys based on values you might be looking for (optional) and a toggle for whether or not to use strict comparison === versus typecasting comparison == (optional)

1

if you can use JQuery then

var keys = []; 
$.each(driversCounter, function(key, value) { 
    keys.push(key); 
}); 

console.log(JSON.stringify(keys));

here follows the answer:

["one","two","three","four","five"]

and this way you wouldn't have to worry if the browser supports Object.keys method or not.

-5

A different approach would be to using multi-dimensional arrays:

var driversCounter = [
    ["one", 1], 
    ["two", 2], 
    ["three", 3], 
    ["four", 4], 
    ["five", 5]
]

and access the value by driverCounter[k][j], where j=0,1 in the case.
Add it in a drop down list by:

var dd = document.getElementById('your_dropdown_element');
for(i=0;i<driversCounter.length-1;i++)
{
    dd.options.add(opt);
    opt.text = driversCounter[i][0];
    opt.value = driversCounter[i][1];
}
  • 1
    That first block of code isn't valid. – alex Sep 27 '13 at 8:43

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