198

I'm trying to return a status code of 304 not modified for a GET method in a web api controller.

The only way I succeeded was something like this:

public class TryController : ApiController
{
    public User GetUser(int userId, DateTime lastModifiedAtClient)
    {
        var user = new DataEntities().Users.First(p => p.Id == userId);
        if (user.LastModified <= lastModifiedAtClient)
        {
             throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.NotModified);
        }
        return user;
    }
}

The problem here is that it's not an exception, It's just not modified so the client cache is OK. I also want the return type to be a User (as all the web api examples shows with GET) not return HttpResponseMessage or something like this.

  • Are you using beta or nightly build? – Aliostad May 18 '12 at 15:30
  • @Aliostad I'm using beta – ozba May 18 '12 at 15:43
  • so what is wrong with returning new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.NotModified) ? Does it not work? – Aliostad May 18 '12 at 15:45
  • @Aliostad I can't return HttpResponseMessage when the return type is User, it's not compiling (obviously). – ozba May 18 '12 at 15:48

11 Answers 11

230

I did not know the answer so asked the ASP.NET team here.

So the trick is to change the signature to HttpResponseMessage and use Request.CreateResponse.

[ResponseType(typeof(User))]
public HttpResponseMessage GetUser(HttpRequestMessage request, int userId, DateTime lastModifiedAtClient)
{
    var user = new DataEntities().Users.First(p => p.Id == userId);
    if (user.LastModified <= lastModifiedAtClient)
    {
         return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.NotModified);
    }
    return request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, user);
}
  • 3
    It doesn't compile in ASP.NET MVC 4 beta release, as CreateResponse takes only status code as parameter. secondly I wanted a solution with no HttpResponseMessage as the return value as it's being deprecated: aspnetwebstack.codeplex.com/discussions/350492 – ozba May 19 '12 at 13:15
  • 5
    In case anyone needs it, to get the value from the controller method would be GetUser(request, id, lastModified).TryGetContentValue(out user), where user (in the example case) is a User object. – Grinn Mar 19 '13 at 19:56
  • 4
    Is this still the preferred method in 2015? MVC 5? – crush Feb 24 '15 at 23:38
  • 4
    The more modern version returns IHttpActionResult - not HttpResponseMessage (2017) – niico Feb 27 '17 at 9:38
  • 7
    To add to niico's suggestion, when the return type is IHttpActionResult and you want to return the User, you can just do return Ok(user). If you need to return another status code (say, forbidden) you can just do return this.StatusCode(HttpStatusCode.Forbidden). – Drew Apr 11 '17 at 20:30
66

You can also do the following if you want to preserve the action signature as returning User:

public User GetUser(int userId, DateTime lastModifiedAtClient) 

If you want to return something other than 200 then you throw an HttpResponseException in your action and pass in the HttpResponseMessage you want to send to the client.

  • 9
    This is a way more elegant solution (albiet incomplete answer). Why is everyone preferring to do it the hard way? – nagytech May 16 '13 at 0:30
  • 4
    @Geoist stackoverflow.com/questions/1282252/…. Throwing exception is costly. – tia Jul 16 '13 at 11:49
  • 10
    Yeah, if you're designing a busy API, using an exception to communicate the most common case of NotModified is really wasteful. If all your APIs did this, then your server will be mostly converting watts to exceptions. – Luke Puplett Nov 28 '13 at 9:51
  • 2
    @nagytech because you can't return a custom error message if you throw an error (like a 400 response)... also throwing exceptions is silly for something that you expect the code to do. Expensive and will be logged when you don't neccesarily want them to be. They're not really exceptions. – Rocklan Mar 19 '15 at 6:02
39

Change the GetXxx API method to return HttpResponseMessage and then return a typed version for the full response and the untyped version for the NotModified response.

    public HttpResponseMessage GetComputingDevice(string id)
    {
        ComputingDevice computingDevice =
            _db.Devices.OfType<ComputingDevice>()
                .SingleOrDefault(c => c.AssetId == id);

        if (computingDevice == null)
        {
            return this.Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotFound);
        }

        if (this.Request.ClientHasStaleData(computingDevice.ModifiedDate))
        {
            return this.Request.CreateResponse<ComputingDevice>(
                HttpStatusCode.OK, computingDevice);
        }
        else
        {
            return this.Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotModified);
        }
    }

*The ClientHasStale data is my extension for checking ETag and IfModifiedSince headers.

The MVC framework should still serialize and return your object.

NOTE

I think the generic version is being removed in some future version of the Web API.

  • 4
    This was the exact answer I was looking for -- albeit as a Task<HttpResponseMessage<T>> return type. Thanks! – xeb Jul 31 '12 at 9:44
  • 1
    @xeb - yes, that's totally worth calling out. More info on async here asp.net/mvc/tutorials/mvc-4/… – Luke Puplett May 8 '13 at 14:18
35

In MVC 5, things got easier:

return new StatusCodeResult(HttpStatusCode.NotModified, this);
  • 1
    Can't specify a message? – crush Mar 14 '16 at 21:44
  • Using a message is actually the accepted answer. This is just a little terser – Jon Bates Mar 15 '16 at 7:26
10

I hate bumping old articles but this is the first result for this in google search and I had a heck of a time with this problem (even with the support of you guys). So here goes nothing...

Hopefully my solution will help those that also was confused.

namespace MyApplication.WebAPI.Controllers
{
    public class BaseController : ApiController
    {
        public T SendResponse<T>(T response, HttpStatusCode statusCode = HttpStatusCode.OK)
        {
            if (statusCode != HttpStatusCode.OK)
            {
                // leave it up to microsoft to make this way more complicated than it needs to be
                // seriously i used to be able to just set the status and leave it at that but nooo... now 
                // i need to throw an exception 
                var badResponse =
                    new HttpResponseMessage(statusCode)
                    {
                        Content =  new StringContent(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(response), Encoding.UTF8, "application/json")
                    };

                throw new HttpResponseException(badResponse);
            }
            return response;
        }
    }
}

and then just inherit from the BaseController

[RoutePrefix("api/devicemanagement")]
public class DeviceManagementController : BaseController
{...

and then using it

[HttpGet]
[Route("device/search/{property}/{value}")]
public SearchForDeviceResponse SearchForDevice(string property, string value)
{
    //todo: limit search property here?
    var response = new SearchForDeviceResponse();

    var results = _deviceManagementBusiness.SearchForDevices(property, value);

    response.Success = true;
    response.Data = results;

    var statusCode = results == null || !results.Any() ? HttpStatusCode.NoContent : HttpStatusCode.OK;

    return SendResponse(response, statusCode);
}
  • 1
    Brilliant. Saved me a ton of time. – gls123 Apr 9 '18 at 9:23
3

.net core 2.2 returning 304 status code. This is using an ApiController.

    [HttpGet]
    public ActionResult<YOUROBJECT> Get()
    {
        return StatusCode(304);
    }

Optionally you can return an object with the response

    [HttpGet]
    public ActionResult<YOUROBJECT> Get()
    {
        return StatusCode(304, YOUROBJECT); 
    }
2
public HttpResponseMessage Post(Article article)
{
    HttpResponseMessage response = Request.CreateResponse<Article>(HttpStatusCode.Created, article);

    string uriToTheCreatedItem = Url.Route(null, new { id = article.Id });
    response.Headers.Location = new Uri(Request.RequestUri, uriToTheCreatedItem);

    return response;
}
2

If you need to return an IHttpActionResult and want to return the error code plus a message, use:

return ResponseMessage(Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotModified, "Error message here"));
1

Another option:

return new NotModified();

public class NotModified : IHttpActionResult
{
    public Task<HttpResponseMessage> ExecuteAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var response = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.NotModified);
        return Task.FromResult(response);
    }
}
1

I don't like having to change my signature to use the HttpCreateResponse type, so I came up with a little bit of an extended solution to hide that.

public class HttpActionResult : IHttpActionResult
{
    public HttpActionResult(HttpRequestMessage request) : this(request, HttpStatusCode.OK)
    {
    }

    public HttpActionResult(HttpRequestMessage request, HttpStatusCode code) : this(request, code, null)
    {
    }

    public HttpActionResult(HttpRequestMessage request, HttpStatusCode code, object result)
    {
        Request = request;
        Code = code;
        Result = result;
    }

    public HttpRequestMessage Request { get; }
    public HttpStatusCode Code { get; }
    public object Result { get; }

    public Task<HttpResponseMessage> ExecuteAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        return Task.FromResult(Request.CreateResponse(Code, Result));
    }
}

You can then add a method to your ApiController (or better your base controller) like this:

protected IHttpActionResult CustomResult(HttpStatusCode code, object data) 
{
    // Request here is the property on the controller.
    return new HttpActionResult(Request, code, data);
}

Then you can return it just like any of the built in methods:

[HttpPost]
public IHttpActionResult Post(Model model)
{
    return model.Id == 1 ?
                Ok() :
                CustomResult(HttpStatusCode.NotAcceptable, new { 
                    data = model, 
                    error = "The ID needs to be 1." 
                });
}
0

An update to @Aliostads answer using the more moden IHttpActionResult introduced in Web API 2.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/web-api/overview/getting-started-with-aspnet-web-api/action-results#ihttpactionresult

public class TryController : ApiController
{
    public IHttpActionResult GetUser(int userId, DateTime lastModifiedAtClient)
    {
        var user = new DataEntities().Users.First(p => p.Id == userId);
        if (user.LastModified <= lastModifiedAtClient)
        {
            return StatusCode(HttpStatusCode.NotModified);
            // If you would like to return a Http Status code with any object instead:
            // return Content(HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError, "My Message");
        }
        return Ok(user);
    }
}

protected by cassiomolin Nov 7 '18 at 11:18

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