257

C++ Notes: Array Initialization has a nice list over initialization of arrays. I have a

int array[100] = {-1};

expecting it to be full with -1's but its not, only first value is and the rest are 0's mixed with random values.

The code

int array[100] = {0};

works just fine and sets each element to 0.

What am I missing here.. Can't one initialize it if the value isn't zero ?

And 2: Is the default initialization (as above) faster than the usual loop through the whole array and assign a value or does it do the same thing?

  • 1
    The behaviour in C and C++ is different. In C {0} is a special case for a struct initializer, however AFAIK not for arrays. int array[100]={0} should be the same as array[100]={[0]=0}, which as a side-effect will zero all other elements. A C compiler should NOT behave as you describe above, instead int array[100]={-1} should set the first element to -1 and the rest to 0 (without noise). In C if you have a struct x array[100], using ={0} as an initializer is NOT valid. You can use {{0}} which will initialize the first element and zero all others, will in most cases will be the same thing. – Fredrik Widlund Feb 26 '15 at 11:08
  • 1
    @FredrikWidlund It's the same in both languages. {0} is not a special case for structs nor arrays. The rule is that elements with no initializer get initialized as if they had 0 for an initializer. If there are nested aggregates (e.g. struct x array[100]) then initializers are applied to the non-aggregates in "row-major" order ; braces may optionally be omitted doing this. struct x array[100] = { 0 } is valid in C; and valid in C++ so long as the first member of struct X accepts 0 as initializer. – M.M Dec 3 '15 at 5:04
  • 1
    { 0 } is not special in C, but it's much harder to define a data type that can't be initialized with it since there are no constructors and thus no way to stop 0 from being implicitly converted and assigned to something. – Leushenko Apr 3 '16 at 11:32
  • 3
    Voted to reopen because the other question is about C. There are many C++ ways to initialize an array that are not valid in C. – xskxzr Jun 15 '18 at 14:36
  • 1
    Also voted for re-open - C and C++ are different languages – Pete Jun 21 '19 at 9:52

13 Answers 13

361

Using the syntax that you used,

int array[100] = {-1};

says "set the first element to -1 and the rest to 0" since all omitted elements are set to 0.

In C++, to set them all to -1, you can use something like std::fill_n (from <algorithm>):

std::fill_n(array, 100, -1);

In portable C, you have to roll your own loop. There are compiler-extensions or you can depend on implementation-defined behavior as a shortcut if that's acceptable.

| improve this answer | |
  • 14
    That also answered an indirect question about how to fill the array with default values "easily". Thank you. – Milan Jun 30 '09 at 20:23
  • 7
    @chessofnerd: not precisely, #include <algorithm> is the right header, <vector> may or may not include it indirectly, that would depend on your implementation. – Evan Teran May 23 '13 at 19:37
  • 2
    You don't have to resort to initializing the array during runtime. If you really need the initialization to happen statically, it's possible to use variadic templates and variadic sequences to generate the desired sequence of ints and expand it into the initializer of the array. – void-pointer Jun 2 '13 at 22:12
  • 2
    @ontherocks, no there is no correct way to use a single call to fill_nto fill an entire 2D array. You need to loop across one dimension, while filling in the other. – Evan Teran Oct 3 '13 at 14:38
  • 8
    This is an answer to some other question. std::fill_n is not initialization. – Ben Voigt Jun 30 '14 at 23:19
136

There is an extension to the gcc compiler which allows the syntax:

int array[100] = { [0 ... 99] = -1 };

This would set all of the elements to -1.

This is known as "Designated Initializers" see here for further information.

Note this isn't implemented for the gcc c++ compiler.

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  • 2
    Awesome. This syntax also seems to work in clang (so can be used on iOS/Mac OS X). – JosephH Jan 7 '14 at 15:03
36

The page you linked to already gave the answer to the first part:

If an explicit array size is specified, but an shorter initiliazation list is specified, the unspecified elements are set to zero.

There is no built-in way to initialize the entire array to some non-zero value.

As for which is faster, the usual rule applies: "The method that gives the compiler the most freedom is probably faster".

int array[100] = {0};

simply tells the compiler "set these 100 ints to zero", which the compiler can optimize freely.

for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i){
  array[i] = 0;
}

is a lot more specific. It tells the compiler to create an iteration variable i, it tells it the order in which the elements should be initialized, and so on. Of course, the compiler is likely to optimize that away, but the point is that here you are overspecifying the problem, forcing the compiler to work harder to get to the same result.

Finally, if you want to set the array to a non-zero value, you should (in C++, at least) use std::fill:

std::fill(array, array+100, 42); // sets every value in the array to 42

Again, you could do the same with an array, but this is more concise, and gives the compiler more freedom. You're just saying that you want the entire array filled with the value 42. You don't say anything about in which order it should be done, or anything else.

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Good answer. Note that in C++ (not in C) you can do int array[100] = {}; and give the compiler the most freedom :) – Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 30 '09 at 20:25
  • 1
    agreed, excellent answer. But for a fixed sized array, it'd use std::fill_n :-P. – Evan Teran Jun 30 '09 at 20:28
14

C++11 has another (imperfect) option:

std::array<int, 100> a;
a.fill(-1);
| improve this answer | |
  • or std::fill(begin(a), end(a), -1) – doctorlai Aug 5 '19 at 23:31
9

With {} you assign the elements as they are declared; the rest is initialized with 0.

If there is no = {} to initalize, the content is undefined.

| improve this answer | |
8

The page you linked states

If an explicit array size is specified, but an shorter initiliazation list is specified, the unspecified elements are set to zero.

Speed issue: Any differences would be negligible for arrays this small. If you work with large arrays and speed is much more important than size, you can have a const array of the default values (initialized at compile time) and then memcpy them to the modifiable array.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    the memcpy isn't a very good idea, since that would be comparable to just setting the values directly speed wise. – Evan Teran Jun 30 '09 at 20:19
  • 1
    I don't see the need for the copy and the const array: Why not create the modifiable array in the first place with the pre-filled values? – Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 30 '09 at 20:20
  • Thanks for the speed explanation and how to do it if the speed is an issue with a large array size (which is in my case) – Milan Jun 30 '09 at 20:22
  • The initializer list is done at compile time and loaded at runtime. No need to go copying things around. – Martin York Jun 30 '09 at 20:22
  • @litb, @Evan: For example gcc generates dynamic initialization (lots of movs) even with optimizations enabled. For large arrays and tight performance requirements, you want to do the init at compile time. memcpy is probably better optimized for large copies than lots of plain movs alone. – laalto Jun 30 '09 at 20:25
6

Using std::array, we can do this in a fairly straightforward way in C++14. It is possible to do in C++11 only, but slightly more complicated.

Our interface is a compile-time size and a default value.

template<typename T>
constexpr auto make_array_n(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, 0>, T &&) {
    return std::array<std::decay_t<T>, 0>{};
}

template<std::size_t size, typename T>
constexpr auto make_array_n(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, size>, T && value) {
    return detail::make_array_n_impl<size>(std::forward<T>(value), std::make_index_sequence<size - 1>{});
}


template<std::size_t size, typename T>
constexpr auto make_array_n(T && value) {
    return make_array_n(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, size>{}, std::forward<T>(value));
}

The third function is mainly for convenience, so the user does not have to construct a std::integral_constant<std::size_t, size> themselves, as that is a pretty wordy construction. The real work is done by one of the first two functions.

The first overload is pretty straightforward: It constructs a std::array of size 0. There is no copying necessary, we just construct it.

The second overload is a little trickier. It forwards along the value it got as the source, and it also constructs an instance of make_index_sequence and just calls some other implementation function. What does that function look like?

namespace detail {

template<std::size_t size, typename T, std::size_t... indexes>
constexpr auto make_array_n_impl(T && value, std::index_sequence<indexes...>) {
    // Use the comma operator to expand the variadic pack
    // Move the last element in if possible. Order of evaluation is well-defined
    // for aggregate initialization, so there is no risk of copy-after-move
    return std::array<std::decay_t<T>, size>{ (static_cast<void>(indexes), value)..., std::forward<T>(value) };
}

}   // namespace detail

This constructs the first size - 1 arguments by copying the value we passed in. Here, we use our variadic parameter pack indexes just as something to expand. There are size - 1 entries in that pack (as we specified in the construction of make_index_sequence), and they have values of 0, 1, 2, 3, ..., size - 2. However, we do not care about the values (so we cast it to void, to silence any compiler warnings). Parameter pack expansion expands out our code to something like this (assuming size == 4):

return std::array<std::decay_t<T>, 4>{ (static_cast<void>(0), value), (static_cast<void>(1), value), (static_cast<void>(2), value), std::forward<T>(value) };

We use those parentheses to ensure that the variadic pack expansion ... expands what we want, and also to ensure we are using the comma operator. Without the parentheses, it would look like we are passing a bunch of arguments to our array initialization, but really, we are evaluating the index, casting it to void, ignoring that void result, and then returning value, which is copied into the array.

The final argument, the one we call std::forward on, is a minor optimization. If someone passes in a temporary std::string and says "make an array of 5 of these", we would like to have 4 copies and 1 move, instead of 5 copies. The std::forward ensures that we do this.

The full code, including headers and some unit tests:

#include <array>
#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

namespace detail {

template<std::size_t size, typename T, std::size_t... indexes>
constexpr auto make_array_n_impl(T && value, std::index_sequence<indexes...>) {
    // Use the comma operator to expand the variadic pack
    // Move the last element in if possible. Order of evaluation is well-defined
    // for aggregate initialization, so there is no risk of copy-after-move
    return std::array<std::decay_t<T>, size>{ (static_cast<void>(indexes), value)..., std::forward<T>(value) };
}

}   // namespace detail

template<typename T>
constexpr auto make_array_n(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, 0>, T &&) {
    return std::array<std::decay_t<T>, 0>{};
}

template<std::size_t size, typename T>
constexpr auto make_array_n(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, size>, T && value) {
    return detail::make_array_n_impl<size>(std::forward<T>(value), std::make_index_sequence<size - 1>{});
}

template<std::size_t size, typename T>
constexpr auto make_array_n(T && value) {
    return make_array_n(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, size>{}, std::forward<T>(value));
}



struct non_copyable {
    constexpr non_copyable() = default;
    constexpr non_copyable(non_copyable const &) = delete;
    constexpr non_copyable(non_copyable &&) = default;
};

int main() {
    constexpr auto array_n = make_array_n<6>(5);
    static_assert(std::is_same<std::decay_t<decltype(array_n)>::value_type, int>::value, "Incorrect type from make_array_n.");
    static_assert(array_n.size() == 6, "Incorrect size from make_array_n.");
    static_assert(array_n[3] == 5, "Incorrect values from make_array_n.");

    constexpr auto array_non_copyable = make_array_n<1>(non_copyable{});
    static_assert(array_non_copyable.size() == 1, "Incorrect array size of 1 for move-only types.");

    constexpr auto array_empty = make_array_n<0>(2);
    static_assert(array_empty.empty(), "Incorrect array size for empty array.");

    constexpr auto array_non_copyable_empty = make_array_n<0>(non_copyable{});
    static_assert(array_non_copyable_empty.empty(), "Incorrect array size for empty array of move-only.");
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Your non_copyable type is actually copyable by the means of operator=. – Hertz Feb 20 '16 at 19:23
  • 1
    I suppose non_copy_constructible would be a more accurate name for the object. However, there is no assignment anywhere in this code, so it doesn't matter for this example. – David Stone Feb 21 '16 at 1:24
  • Amazing solution! why this answer has low vote? – LongLT Jul 24 at 7:49
5

Another way of initializing the array to a common value, would be to actually generate the list of elements in a series of defines:

#define DUP1( X ) ( X )
#define DUP2( X ) DUP1( X ), ( X )
#define DUP3( X ) DUP2( X ), ( X )
#define DUP4( X ) DUP3( X ), ( X )
#define DUP5( X ) DUP4( X ), ( X )
.
.
#define DUP100( X ) DUP99( X ), ( X )

#define DUPx( X, N ) DUP##N( X )
#define DUP( X, N ) DUPx( X, N )

Initializing an array to a common value can easily be done:

#define LIST_MAX 6
static unsigned char List[ LIST_MAX ]= { DUP( 123, LIST_MAX ) };

Note: DUPx introduced to enable macro substitution in parameters to DUP

| improve this answer | |
4

For the case of an array of single-byte elements, you can use memset to set all elements to the same value.

There's an example here.

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1

1) When you use an initializer, for a struct or an array like that, the unspecified values are essentially default constructed. In the case of a primitive type like ints, that means they will be zeroed. Note that this applies recursively: you could have an array of structs containing arrays and if you specify just the first field of the first struct, then all the rest will be initialized with zeros and default constructors.

2) The compiler will probably generate initializer code that is at least as good as you could do by hand. I tend to prefer to let the compiler do the initialization for me, when possible.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1) Default initialiszation of POD's is not happening here. Using the list the compiler will generate the values at compile time and place them in a special section of the assembley that is just loaded as part of program initialization (like the code). So the cost is zero at runtime. – Martin York Jun 30 '09 at 20:20
  • 1
    I don't see where he is wrong? int a[100] = { } certainly is initialized to all 0, disregarding to where it appears, and struct { int a; } b[100] = { }; is too. "essentially default constructed" => "value constructed", tho. But this doesn't matter in case of ints, PODS or types with user declared ctors. It only matters for NON-Pods without user declared ctors, to what i know. But i wouldn't cast a down(!) vote because of this. anyway, +1 for you to make it 0 again :) – Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 30 '09 at 20:37
  • @Evan: I qualified my statement with "When you use an initializer..." I was not referring to uninitialized values. @Martin: That might work for constant, static, or global data. But I don't see how that would work with something like: int test(){ int i[10]={0}; int v=i[0]; i[0]=5; return v; } The compiler had better be initializing i[] to zeros each time you call test(). – Boojum Jun 30 '09 at 20:46
  • it could place data into the static data segment, and make "i" refer to it :) – Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 30 '09 at 20:52
  • True -- technically, in this case it could also elide "i" entirely and just return 0. But using the static data segment for mutable data would be dangerous in multi-threaded environments. The point that I was trying to make in answer to Martin was simply that you can't completely eliminate the cost of initialization. Copy a pre-made chunk from the static data segment, sure, but it's still not free. – Boojum Jun 30 '09 at 21:03
1

In C++, it is also possible to use meta programming and variadic templates. The following post shows how to do it: Programmatically create static arrays at compile time in C++.

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0

In the C++ programming language V4, Stroustrup recommends using vectors or valarrays over builtin arrays. With valarrary's, when you create them, you can init them to a specific value like:

valarray <int>seven7s=(7777777,7);

To initialize an array 7 members long with "7777777".

This is a C++ way of implementing the answer using a C++ data structure instead of a "plain old C" array.

I switched to using the valarray as an attempt in my code to try to use C++'isms v. C'isms....

| improve this answer | |
  • This is the second worst example of how to use a type I've ever seen... – Steazy Feb 5 '18 at 3:10
-2

Should be a standard feature but for some reason it's not included in standard C nor C++...

#include <stdio.h>

 __asm__
 (
"    .global _arr;      "
"    .section .data;    "
"_arr: .fill 100, 1, 2; "
 );

extern char arr[];

int main() 
{
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
        printf("arr[%u] = %u.\n", i, arr[i]);
    }
}

In Fortran you could do:

program main
    implicit none

    byte a(100)
    data a /100*2/
    integer i

    do i = 0, 100
        print *, a(i)
    end do
end

but it does not have unsigned numbers...

Why can't C/C++ just implement it. Is it really so hard? It's so silly to have to write this manually to achieve the same result...

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

/* did I count it correctly? I'm not quite sure. */
uint8_t arr = {
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
};    

int main() 
{
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
        printf("arr[%u] = %u.\n", i, arr[i]);
    }
}

What if it was an array of 1,000,00 bytes? I'd need to write a script to write it for me, or resort to hacks with assembly/etc. This is nonsense.

It's perfectly portable, there's no reason for it not to be in the language.

Just hack it in like:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

/* a byte array of 100 twos declared at compile time. */
uint8_t twos[] = {100:2};

int main()
{
    uint_fast32_t i;
    for (i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
        printf("twos[%u] = %u.\n", i, twos[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}

One way to hack it in is via preprocessing... (Code below does not cover edge cases, but is written to quickly demonstrate what could be done.)

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

open my $inf, "<main.c";
open my $ouf, ">out.c";

my @lines = <$inf>;

foreach my $line (@lines) {
    if ($line =~ m/({(\d+):(\d+)})/) {
        printf ("$1, $2, $3");        
        my $lnew = "{" . "$3, "x($2 - 1) . $3 . "}";
        $line =~ s/{(\d+:\d+)}/$lnew/;
        printf $ouf $line;
    } else {
        printf $ouf $line;
    }
}

close($ouf);
close($inf);
| improve this answer | |
  • you are printing in a loop, why can't you assign in a loop? – Abhinav Gauniyal Jan 13 '17 at 6:07
  • 1
    assigning inside a loop incurs runtime overhead; whereas hardcoding the buffer is free because the buffer is already embedded into the binary, so it doesn't waste time constructing the array from scratch each time the program runs. you are right that printing in a loop isnt a good idea overall though, it's better to append inside the loop and then print once, since each printf call requires a system call, whereas string concatenation using the application's heap/stack does not. Since size in this kind of program is a nonissue, it's best to construct this array at compile time, not runtime. – Dmitry Jan 13 '17 at 20:04
  • "assigning inside a loop incurs runtime overhead" - You do severely underestimate the optimizer. – Asu May 2 '17 at 20:38
  • Depending on the size of the array, gcc and clang will "hardcode" or trick the value in, and with larger arrays, directly just memset it, even with the "hardcoded" array. – Asu May 2 '17 at 20:48
  • On some target, the compiler will place a runtime-constructed array in ram, and moreover, you can't declare the array as const. A fill initialization would be actually very nice in such cases... – hl037_ Jul 17 at 13:21

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