10

Why does the following code return with a segmentation fault? When I comment out line 7, the seg fault disappears.

int main(void){
      char *s;
      int ln;
      puts("Enter String");
      // scanf("%s", s);
      gets(s);
      ln = strlen(s); // remove this line to end seg fault
      char *dyn_s = (char*) malloc (strlen(s)+1); //strlen(s) is used here as well but doesn't change outcome
      dyn_s = s;
      dyn_s[strlen(s)] = '\0';
      puts(dyn_s);
      return 0;
    }

Cheers!

marked as duplicate by Lundin c Jun 3 '16 at 9:39

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16

s is an uninitialized pointer; you are writing to a random location in memory. This will invoke undefined behaviour.

You need to allocate some memory for s. Also, never use gets; there is no way to prevent it overflowing the memory you allocate. Use fgets instead.

  • Thanks a lot Oli! Pardon me for being a pest, but, am I to understand that the addition of the line I mentioned, causes the undefined behavior to result in a seg fault. Could you help me visualize the causality a bit more? – ceod May 19 '12 at 20:19
  • @resonant_fractal: It's difficult to say. Undefined behaviour, by definition, means that your program could do anything, including failing in unpredictable ways. I could make guesses, but the only way to know for sure would be to look at the machine code that your compiler produced. – Oliver Charlesworth May 19 '12 at 20:21
  • Thanks a lot Oli! – ceod May 19 '12 at 20:22
  • because the strlen() function try to access a space that don't exists. same as strlen(NULL). Inside function there something like: size_t strlen(char *s) { char *p=s; while( *p++ ) < it causes the segmentation fault. – The Mask May 19 '12 at 20:38
  • @TheMask Thanks! But what about the malloc in line 8 using the same strlen expression? The whole program runs without any errors if i just remove line 7. Or are you guys getting something different? – ceod May 19 '12 at 21:17
3

Catastrophically bad:

int main(void){
      char *s;
      int ln;
      puts("Enter String");
      // scanf("%s", s);
      gets(s);
      ln = strlen(s); // remove this line to end seg fault
      char *dyn_s = (char*) malloc (strlen(s)+1); //strlen(s) is used here as well but doesn't change outcome
      dyn_s = s;
      dyn_s[strlen(s)] = '\0';
      puts(dyn_s);
      return 0;
    }

Better:

#include <stdio.h>
#define BUF_SIZE 80

int 
main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
      char s[BUF_SIZE];
      int ln;
      puts("Enter String");
      // scanf("%s", s);
      gets(s);
      ln = strlen(s); // remove this line to end seg fault
      char *dyn_s = (char*) malloc (strlen(s)+1); //strlen(s) is used here as well but doesn't change outcome
      dyn_s = s;
      dyn_s[strlen(s)] = '\0';
      puts(dyn_s);
      return 0;
    }

Best:

#include <stdio.h>
#define BUF_SIZE 80

int 
main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
      char s[BUF_SIZE];
      int ln;
      puts("Enter String");
      fgets(s, BUF_SIZE, stdin); // Use fgets (our "cin"): NEVER "gets()"

      int ln = strlen(s); 
      char *dyn_s = (char*) malloc (ln+1);
      strcpy (dyn_s, s);
      puts(dyn_s);
      return 0;
    }
  • Better still: char *dyn_s = malloc(ln + 1);. And note that fgets() leaves the terminating '\n' in the buffer; gets() discards it (but gets() is still catastrophically bad). – Keith Thompson May 19 '12 at 20:19
  • Cool! Thanks. Any great resources you have links to, wrt the behavior of commonly used IO functions? – ceod May 19 '12 at 20:26
  • And besides cast malloc() result removal,check if you have no received a NULL value. char *dyn_s = malloc(ln + 1); if(!dyn_s) { printf("No mem!\n"); exit(EXIT_FAILURE);} or can you get another segmentation fault. – The Mask May 19 '12 at 22:10
  • @resonant_fractal: check out: cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio – The Mask May 19 '12 at 22:12
  • @TheMask: Thank you!!! – ceod May 20 '12 at 6:56
1

Your scanf("%s", s); is commented out. That means s is uninitialized, so when this line ln = strlen(s); executes, you get a seg fault.

It always helps to initialize a pointer to NULL, and then test for null before using the pointer.

  • Thanks! Will do the NULL pointer initialization and testing more often. I don't think I get the scanf part. Shouldn't the scanf fail too? After all, the pointer is not initialized to anything and may point to some arbitrary and illegal location as the start position of the string, hence a seg fault? I commented it out since including it was also resulting in seg faults. Or have I failed to understand something? – ceod May 21 '12 at 18:45
  • This answer is wrong. If you initialize that pointer to NULL, that will also result in UB - NULL is never to be dereferenced, not even by scanf... – user529758 Sep 15 '12 at 10:12
  • I test my pointers to see if they are set to null. If initialized to null before using, then there is a reasonable chance the pointer is not already assigned to valid memory. – octopusgrabbus Sep 15 '12 at 13:53
1

Even better

#include <stdio.h>
int
main(void)
{
  char *line = NULL;
  size_t count;
  char *dup_line;

  getline(&line,&count, stdin);
  dup_line=strdup(line);

  puts(dup_line);

  free(dup_line);
  free(line);

  return 0;
}
  • Hi! I have never used the getline() and strdup() functions. I don't think i have seen them before either. Thanks for introducing them to me ;). Umm unfortunately your code runs into a seg fault! – ceod Oct 18 '12 at 9:58
  • Strange. Warning about implicit declaration, correct work for me. GNU/Linux system, gcc 4.6.3. – KAction Oct 18 '12 at 10:10
  • line should be initialized with NULL. Yeah, C can be cruel. – KAction Oct 18 '12 at 10:21
  • Cool! Thanks KAction! Been a little busy lately. I promise I'll look deeper into the inner machinations of your code sometime soon. Have a great weekend. Cheers! – ceod Oct 19 '12 at 12:19
1
char *s  does not have some memory allocated . You need to allocate it manually in your case . You can do it as follows
s = (char *)malloc(100) ;

This would not lead to segmentation fault error as you will not be refering to an unknown location anymore

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