I've been reading on the gl.h header file included with my version of Visual Studio and it seems heavily outdated.

I do not want GLUT or any other middleware/utility library in between to do the dirty work for me, that includes GLEW. Could someone elaborate on why and how does one acquire/query for the modern feature set of the 4.0 specification and what's the idea behind GLEW in general?

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    You don't need GLEW if you are ok with writing code for getting function entry points yourself. – Mārtiņš Možeiko May 20 '12 at 3:42
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    "I do not want GLUT or any other middleware/utility library in between to do the dirty work for me, that includes GLEW." Why not? Do you think you'll gain something by writing hundreds if not thousands of lines of OpenGL initialization code? Believe me: it will not make you a better programmer. You will not achieve enlightenment by doing so. This will not bring you to Nirvana or a state of perfect bliss. Re-inventing the OpenGL Loading wheel is a waste of time, regardless of your skill level. Just use an existing library. – Nicol Bolas May 20 '12 at 6:13
up vote 15 down vote accepted

The gl.h shipping with MSVC++ covers only the functions exported by the opengl32.dll shipping with Windows. This DLL is mostly only a so called "trampoline" into the actual driver. But it only exports a very old version of OpenGL, namely OpenGL-1.1.

Any functionality beyond that must be accessed through the extension mechanism.

I do not want GLUT or any other middleware/utility library in between to do the dirty work for me, that includes GLEW.

GLUT is completely unrelated to GLEW

Could someone elaborate on why and how does one acquire/query for the modern feature set of the 4.0 specification and what's the idea behind GLEW in general?

You aquire the modern feature set through the already mentioned extension system.

There is a function ?glGetProcAddress (exact name depending on the OS environment, in Windows wglGetProcAddress). Using this function you retrieve function pointers to the procedures of extensions for the current OpenGL context (in GLX the function pointers are the same for all contexts, but in Windows they may differ).

Loading a extension goes about this:

typedef (*OGLEXTP_SOMEEXTENSIONFUNCTION)(...)
OGLEXTP_SOMEEXTENSIONFUNCTION oglextp_glSomeExtensionFunction = NULL;
#define glSomeExtensionFunction oglextp_glSomeExtensionFunction;


struct Extensions
{
    bool SomeExtensionFunction;
}

errorcode initGLExtensions(){
    Extensions available;

    GLubyte extensions = glGetStrings(GL_EXTENSIONS);
    parse_extension_string(extensions, available);

    if( available.SomeExtensionFunction ) {
        oglextp_glSomeExtensionFunction = wglGwtProcAddress("glSomeExtensionFunction");
        if( !oglextp_glSomeExtensionFunction )
             return errorcode;
    }
}

And you have to write the bulk code of this for each and every function. Nobody wants to write this. So the developers of GLEW came up with a set of scripts, that fetch the extension specifications from opengl.org and automatically create the whole extension loading and wrap this into a small library, that creates no additional dependencies.

If you want to use higher OpenGL functionality: Use GLEW. Not because it's mandatory, but because it's the most straightforward way to go about this.

  • GLUT and GLEW are related. They strip away the boilerplate, the dirty details. Some people, like myself, prefer understanding to ease of use. Thank you for an otherwise splendid answer! – Fractal Resurgence May 20 '12 at 18:07
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    @FractalResurgence: No they're not related. They're completely independent projects with different goals. GLUT provides a basic framework for simple OpenGL development, but there are many others. GLEW is a library that does the heavy lifting of OpenGL extension loading. You can use GLFW without GLUT and you can use GLUT without GLFW. Claiming GLUT and GLFW being related was as claiming Microsoft Word and Quark Express were related. – datenwolf May 20 '12 at 18:12
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    GLUT is useful for educational purposes, but it is garbage as a serious window manager. – TheBuzzSaw May 21 '12 at 22:25
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    @TheBuzzSaw: I know what you mean, but GLUT is not a Window manager, but a application framework. A window manager is that program, that manages window placement on the screen and draws their decoration, borders and title bars. – datenwolf May 21 '12 at 23:15
  • @datenwolf Nobody said they are similar in design, but in most general purpose. They deal with things people don't want to because of laziness or other reasons. They simplify and abstract their respective parts of the API and its connection to the underlying OS. They are related in purpose - simplification and abstraction. And that's all I meant by related. – Fractal Resurgence May 22 '12 at 2:35

Don't be afraid of GLEW. First, I've actually seen GLEW used in Nvidia OpenGL SDK examples. It's obviously a reliable tool with a friendly license. Second, you can statically link the library and vaporize it as a dependency. (Personally, I just add the source code to my project and #define GLEW_STATIC to make it work.)

You want to access OpenGL 4.0 extensions right? You may need to create a OpenGL 4.0 context and ask GLEW to bind corresponding functions.

Here is a sample with GLEW and GLFW copied from my project.

  ...

  if (!glfwInit()) {
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  glfwOpenWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_VERSION_MAJOR, 2);   // I requested OpenGL 2.1 context
  glfwOpenWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_VERSION_MINOR, 1);

  if(!glfwOpenWindow(640, 480, 8, 8, 8, 0, 24, 0, GLFW_WINDOW)) {  // get OpenGL context
    glfwTerminate();
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  if (glewInit() != GLEW_OK) {   // init glew, and bind gl* Extension functions
    glfwTerminate();
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  // now gl* extensions is available here

  ....

GLee is another library for loading OpenGL extensions, and it's pretty straightforward and easy to understand the source code (the code generator is a different story). So you can see how loading extension functions works.

Do use the SVN trunk, not the "released" version, since I worked with the author to add support for the OpenGL 4.x extensions.

What I like about GLee is that it only loads the extensions you use, in contrast to GLEW which loads 200+ different extensions, which slows down program startup and especially slows down OpenGL profiling.

  • Is it easy to turn GLEW to GLEE? And how a much performance did it gai n from changing libs? – xiaoyi May 20 '12 at 3:57
  • Thanks for the info! May I ask why is it so cryptic in design (OpenGL, I mean)? It seems like a rather ugly approach, overhead that should've been done by the Khronos Group (except the vendor-specific stuff that should be evaded anyways)? – Fractal Resurgence May 20 '12 at 4:08
  • @Fractal: I'm not really an expert, but the extension approach so far has prevented any bad ideas from making it into the core profile, since they go through a testing phase as an extension first. Also, hardware support varies tremendously... using extensions makes your program incompatible with older cards, so you have to explicitly choose to use those features. – Ben Voigt May 20 '12 at 4:31
  • "Do use the SVN trunk, not the 'released' version, since I worked with the author to add support for the OpenGL 4.x extensions." Isn't that cause for them making a, you know, release? Activity in SVN is nice and all, but if it's not in an actual release, it's not going to mean anything. There's a reason why the OpenGL wiki page says that it's defunct. If it's still being actively maintained, then it needs to also be actively released. – Nicol Bolas May 20 '12 at 6:17
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    @Nicol: For the purpose of this question, which is learning how extensions get loaded, simple code is better than neatly packaged. GLee doesn't release as binaries anyway, it's just a .c and .h file to compile alongside your own code. – Ben Voigt May 20 '12 at 13:42

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