In python to comment-out multiple lines we use triple quotes

def x():
   """This code will 
      add 1 and 1 """
   a=1+1

but what if I have to comment out a block of code which already contains lot of other comment out blocks (triple quote comments). For example if I want to comment out this function fully..

"""
def x():
   """This code will 
      add 1 and 1 """
   a=1+1
"""

This doesn't work. How can I comment out such blocks of code.

  • 2
    If you have double quotes on the inside, you can use single quotes on the outside. ''' """comment""" '''. this works. – Josiah May 21 '12 at 9:23
up vote 10 down vote accepted

In python to comment-out multiple lines we use triple commas

That’s just one way of doing it, and you’re technically using a string literal, not a comment. And, although it has become fairly established, this way of writing comments has the drawback you observed: you cannot comment out nested blocks.1

Python doesn’t have nesting multiline comments, it’s as simple as that. If you want to comment out multiple lines allowing for nested comments, the only safe choice is to comment out each line.

Most editors have some command that makes commenting out or in multiple lines easy.


1 For a single level of nesting you can in fact use '''"""nested """''', or the other way round. But I wouldn’t recommend it.

  • However, the "comments" in the OP's examples are both docstrings, which might make this a bit confusing to someone coming from an environment where inline docs aren't available at runtime. – lvc May 21 '12 at 9:34
  • 3
    "Abusing" seems a little over-the-top, given that the technique has been endorsed by Guido himself: "Python tip: You can use multi-line strings as multi-line comments. Unless used as docstrings, they generate no code! :-)" – DSM May 21 '12 at 16:43
  • 2
    Using an editor to do this by prepending #'s to the beginnings of lines, even with Emacs or VIM, is a bad way to do it. The triple-quote method is a de facto standard for this and the OP's question is a legitimate one. – ely Nov 5 '12 at 20:01
  • @EMS I never doubted the question’s legitimacy. But this technique of quoting certainly isn’t a “de facto standard”. It appears to be used by some developers (Guido including, as a previous commenter noted) but that doesn’t make it a standard. What’s more, the question was about nested multiline comments. I challenge you to find the mistake in my answer to that question. Your assertion that it’s bad to use a text editor to comment out multiple lines is simply ridiculous. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 6 '12 at 11:26
  • Well, we disagree. Batch pasting columns of #'s is too cumbersome, even with things like rectangle pasting in Emacs. It also makes huge sections of code become a giant eyesore while you are commenting them out. There are a number of practical reasons why triple quoting a block is much more effective, which is why so many Python programmers use that technique. I don't agree that it's "ridiculous" at all. When I come across code where other have batch pasted #'s I just give a big eye roll. It's even worse if someone gets that code in a basic editor, like gedit, that makes column selection hard. – ely Nov 6 '12 at 14:18

What I often do in brief hack&slay situations is something like this below. It is not really a comment, and it does not cover all cases (because you need to have a block), but maybe it is helpful:

if 0:  # disabled because *some convincing reason*
  def x():
   """This code will 
      add 1 and 1 """
   a=1+1

Or, if you cannot or don't like to introduce indenting levels between the typical ones:

# disabled because *some convincing reason*
if 0:  # def x():
   """This code will 
      add 1 and 1 """
   a=1+1

You should use # for commenting, and at the beginning of each line. This is very easy if you're using eclipse + pydev.

Simply select the block of code to comment, and press Ctrl + \. The same goes for uncommentng as well.

I'm sure there are such easy ways in other editors as well.

I'm taking a Udacity python programming course building a search engine. They use the triple quotes to enclose a webpage's source code as a string in the variable 'page' to be searched for all the links.

page = '''web page source code''' that is searched with a page.find()

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