63

for instance,

n = 3432, result 4

n = 45, result 2

n = 33215, result 5

n = -357, result 3

I guess I could just turn it into a string then get the length of the string but that seems convoluted and hack-y.

  • 5
    Getting the string length would fail in case of negative numbers. So get the length of the absolute value instead. ;-) – Wim ten Brink Jul 1 '09 at 12:50
  • 1
    char buff[100]; int r = sprintf(buff,"%s",n) - (r<0); – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 13:25
  • 1
    you mean decimal digits? decimal places are something that real numbers have, and integers don't, by definition. – Will Jul 1 '09 at 13:38
  • 1
    Uh ... Pax, is that a legal expression? Since r doesn't have a value before the assignment, the "(r < 0)" part seems scary. Or perhaps you meant that it should bne done as a second step, so it's just the notation that I'm not getting (I'm reading it as if it were C). – unwind Jul 1 '09 at 13:41
  • 3
    Must ... remember ... to ... unit ... test! char buff[100]; int r = sprintf(buff,"%d",n) - (n<0); – paxdiablo Jul 2 '09 at 4:33

20 Answers 20

97
floor (log10 (abs (x))) + 1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logarithm

  • 18
    Not when x is zero. – finnw Jul 1 '09 at 12:31
  • 40
    so check that it isn't zero before... – Nathan Fellman Jul 1 '09 at 12:44
  • 10
    This would be needlessly slow. Don't use expensive functions such as log10() without a reason. The fast, integer function is simple enough to bother writing it. – stormsoul Jul 1 '09 at 14:31
  • 27
    Geez .. are you people still running an 8088? Who cares about few extra clock cycles. It took Paz 100,000,000 iterations to make a measurable difference, and even that was negligible! 6 seconds! Whoop-dee-do .. get on with your life. Next year it'll be 3 seconds. – eduffy Jul 1 '09 at 15:07
  • 9
    It turns out that although simple division is faster for small values, logarithm scales much better. If you call the division algorithms with every int from MIN_INT to MAX_INT (and repeat that the same 100m times as Paz's examples), you end up with an average of 13.337 seconds per call. Doing the same with Logarithm is an average of 8.143 seconds, the recursion takes 11.971 seconds, and the cascading If statements ends up taking an average of 0.953 seconds. So, the Daily-WTF-looking solution is an order of magnitude faster, but in the long run, this is in second place. – Matt Poush Jul 1 '09 at 18:55
134

The recursive approach :-)

int numPlaces (int n) {
    if (n < 0) return numPlaces ((n == INT_MIN) ? MAX_INT: -n);
    if (n < 10) return 1;
    return 1 + numPlaces (n / 10);
}

Or iterative:

int numPlaces (int n) {
    int r = 1;
    if (n < 0) n = (n == INT_MIN) ? INT_MAX: -n;
    while (n > 9) {
        n /= 10;
        r++;
    }
    return r;
}

Or raw speed:

int numPlaces (int n) {
    if (n < 0) n = (n == INT_MIN) ? INT_MAX : -n;
    if (n < 10) return 1;
    if (n < 100) return 2;
    if (n < 1000) return 3;
    if (n < 10000) return 4;
    if (n < 100000) return 5;
    if (n < 1000000) return 6;
    if (n < 10000000) return 7;
    if (n < 100000000) return 8;
    if (n < 1000000000) return 9;
    /*      2147483647 is 2^31-1 - add more ifs as needed
       and adjust this final return as well. */
    return 10;
}

Those above have been modified to better process MININT. On any weird systems that don't follow sensible 2n two's complement rules for integers, they may need further adjustment.

The raw speed version actually outperforms the floating point version, modified below:

int numPlaces (int n) {
    if (n == 0) return 1;
    return floor (log10 (abs (n))) + 1;
}

With a hundred million iterations, I get the following results:

Raw speed with 0:            0 seconds
Raw speed with 2^31-1:       1 second
Iterative with 2^31-1:       5 seconds
Recursive with 2^31-1:       6 seconds
Floating point with 1:       6 seconds
Floating point with 2^31-1:  7 seconds

That actually surprised me a little - I thought the Intel chips had a decent FPU but I guess general FP operations still can't compete with hand-optimized integer code.

Update following stormsoul's suggestions:

Testing the multiply-iterative solution by stormsoul gives a result of 4 seconds so, while it's much faster than the divide-iterative solution, it still doesn't match the optimized if-statement solution.

Choosing the arguments from a pool of 1000 randomly generated numbers pushed the raw speed time out to 2 seconds so, while it appears there may have been some advantage to having the same argument each time, it's still the fastest approach listed.

Compiling with -O2 improved the speeds but not the relative positions (I increased the iteration count by a factor of ten to check this).

Any further analysis is going to have to get seriously into the inner workings of CPU efficiency (different types of optimization, use of caches, branch prediction, which CPU you actually have, the ambient temperature in the room and so on) which is going to get in the way of my paid work :-). It's been an interesting diversion but, at some point, the return on investment for optimization becomes too small to matter. I think we've got enough solutions to have answered the question (which was, after all, not about speed).

Further update:

This will be my final update to this answer barring glaring errors that aren't dependent on architecture. Inspired by stormsoul's valiant efforts to measure, I'm posting my test program (modified as per stormsoul's own test program) along with some sample figures for all methods shown in the answers here. Keep in mind this is on a particular machine, your mileage may vary depending on where you run it (which is why I'm posting the test code).

Do with it as you wish:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <time.h>

#define numof(a) (sizeof(a) / sizeof(a[0]))

/* Random numbers and accuracy checks. */

static int rndnum[10000];
static int rt[numof(rndnum)];

/* All digit counting functions here. */

static int count_recur (int n) {
    if (n < 0) return count_recur ((n == INT_MIN) ? INT_MAX : -n);
    if (n < 10) return 1;
    return 1 + count_recur (n / 10);
}

static int count_diviter (int n) {
    int r = 1;
    if (n < 0) n = (n == INT_MIN) ? INT_MAX : -n;
    while (n > 9) {
        n /= 10;
        r++;
    }
    return r;
}

static int count_multiter (int n) {
    unsigned int num = abs(n);
    unsigned int x, i;
    for (x=10, i=1; ; x*=10, i++) {
        if (num < x)
            return i;
        if (x > INT_MAX/10)
            return i+1;
    }
}

static int count_ifs (int n) {
    if (n < 0) n = (n == INT_MIN) ? INT_MAX : -n;
    if (n < 10) return 1;
    if (n < 100) return 2;
    if (n < 1000) return 3;
    if (n < 10000) return 4;
    if (n < 100000) return 5;
    if (n < 1000000) return 6;
    if (n < 10000000) return 7;
    if (n < 100000000) return 8;
    if (n < 1000000000) return 9;
    /*      2147483647 is 2^31-1 - add more ifs as needed
    and adjust this final return as well. */
    return 10;
}

static int count_revifs (int n) {
    if (n < 0) n = (n == INT_MIN) ? INT_MAX : -n;
    if (n > 999999999) return 10;
    if (n > 99999999) return 9;
    if (n > 9999999) return 8;
    if (n > 999999) return 7;
    if (n > 99999) return 6;
    if (n > 9999) return 5;
    if (n > 999) return 4;
    if (n > 99) return 3;
    if (n > 9) return 2;
    return 1;
}

static int count_log10 (int n) {
    if (n < 0) n = (n == INT_MIN) ? INT_MAX : -n;
    if (n == 0) return 1;
    return floor (log10 (n)) + 1;
}

static int count_bchop (int n) {
    int r = 1;
    if (n < 0) n = (n == INT_MIN) ? INT_MAX : -n;
    if (n >= 100000000) {
        r += 8;
        n /= 100000000;
    }
    if (n >= 10000) {
        r += 4;
        n /= 10000;
    }
    if (n >= 100) {
        r += 2;
        n /= 100;
    }
    if (n >= 10)
        r++;

    return r;
}

/* Structure to control calling of functions. */

typedef struct {
    int (*fnptr)(int);
    char *desc;
} tFn;

static tFn fn[] = {
    NULL,                              NULL,
    count_recur,    "            recursive",
    count_diviter,  "     divide-iterative",
    count_multiter, "   multiply-iterative",
    count_ifs,      "        if-statements",
    count_revifs,   "reverse-if-statements",
    count_log10,    "               log-10",
    count_bchop,    "          binary chop",
};
static clock_t clk[numof (fn)];

int main (int c, char *v[]) {
    int i, j, k, r;
    int s = 1;

    /* Test code:
        printf ("%11d %d\n", INT_MIN, count_recur(INT_MIN));
        for (i = -1000000000; i != 0; i /= 10)
            printf ("%11d %d\n", i, count_recur(i));
        printf ("%11d %d\n", 0, count_recur(0));
        for (i = 1; i != 1000000000; i *= 10)
            printf ("%11d %d\n", i, count_recur(i));
        printf ("%11d %d\n", 1000000000, count_recur(1000000000));
        printf ("%11d %d\n", INT_MAX, count_recur(INT_MAX));
    /* */

    /* Randomize and create random pool of numbers. */

    srand (time (NULL));
    for (j = 0; j < numof (rndnum); j++) {
        rndnum[j] = s * rand();
        s = -s;
    }
    rndnum[0] = INT_MAX;
    rndnum[1] = INT_MIN;

    /* For testing. */
    for (k = 0; k < numof (rndnum); k++) {
        rt[k] = (fn[1].fnptr)(rndnum[k]);
    }

    /* Test each of the functions in turn. */

    clk[0] = clock();
    for (i = 1; i < numof (fn); i++) {
        for (j = 0; j < 10000; j++) {
            for (k = 0; k < numof (rndnum); k++) {
                r = (fn[i].fnptr)(rndnum[k]);
                /* Test code:
                    if (r != rt[k]) {
                        printf ("Mismatch error [%s] %d %d %d %d\n",
                            fn[i].desc, k, rndnum[k], rt[k], r);
                        return 1;
                    }
                /* */
            }
        }
        clk[i] = clock();
    }

    /* Print out results. */

    for (i = 1; i < numof (fn); i++) {
        printf ("Time for %s: %10d\n", fn[i].desc, (int)(clk[i] - clk[i-1]));
    }

    return 0;
}

Remember that you need to ensure you use the correct command line to compile it. In particular, you may need to explicitly list the math library to get log10() working. The command line I used under Debian was gcc -o testprog testprog.c -lm.

And, in terms of results, here's the leader-board for my environment:

Optimization level 0:

Time for reverse-if-statements:       1704
Time for         if-statements:       2296
Time for           binary chop:       2515
Time for    multiply-iterative:       5141
Time for      divide-iterative:       7375
Time for             recursive:      10469
Time for                log-10:      26953

Optimization level 3:

Time for         if-statements:       1047
Time for           binary chop:       1156
Time for reverse-if-statements:       1500
Time for    multiply-iterative:       2937
Time for      divide-iterative:       5391
Time for             recursive:       8875
Time for                log-10:      25438
  • 3
    Recursive version seems to me like the cleanest, simplest, best self-documenting solution posted. – John Pirie Jul 1 '09 at 13:06
  • 4
    @moogs, you can use any of the solutions presented in this, or any other, answer here. The speed testing was really just an aside (that got out of hand). And in any case, you still have that time available to you - it's only my time that was possibly wasted here so feel free to use the fruits of my labor as you wish :-) – paxdiablo Jul 2 '09 at 2:34
  • 3
    A small performance tip - when you know some value is always non-negative, use unsigned types. They are slightly faster to multiply and divide. The compiler might guess for you that some variable is never negative and make this optimization automatically, but again, it might not. In more complex situations it never does. – stormsoul Jul 2 '09 at 10:46
  • 1
    Right. Someone in IRC made some performance tests, then he used unsigned and he god some really great boost. I urge you to try the unsigned world! :) – Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 2 '09 at 14:05
  • 1
    Nice answer =) I like the raw-speed version, but I think it can be improved by branching in a binary fashion to reduce the worst-case number of comparisons to four (disregarding the negative-test), obviously at the expense of readability. In that respect, one can tune a version of it specifically to the intended data range. – paddy Oct 26 '12 at 3:13
26

Binary search pseudo algorithm to get no of digits of r in v..

if (v < 0 ) v=-v;

r=1;

if (v >= 100000000)
{
  r+=8;
  v/=100000000;
}

if (v >= 10000) {
    r+=4;
    v/=10000;
}

if (v >= 100) {
    r+=2;
    v/=100;
}

if( v>=10)
{
    r+=1;
}

return r;
  • 4
    Why the downvote, this looks even more efficient than the divide-by-ten loops? – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 13:37
  • 1
    Downvote was not from me, but I suspect it was because this is less readable than Wayne Shephard's variation (and probably slower). – Brian Jul 1 '09 at 14:04
  • 5
    I see, but I don't think it's right to downvote something for being less helpful - the popup clearly states "This answer is not helpful". In that case, I would upvote the other and leave this one alone. This was a genuine improvement over the /10 iteration. Still, it's positive now so no harm, no foul. (This isn't directed at you Brian since, as you already said, you didn't do it). Just food for thought for whoever did. – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 14:12
  • 5
    My algorithm can be easily extended for longlong variable by having another if statement at the beginning if (v >= 10000000000000000LL) { r+=16; v/=10000000000000000LL; } and will be faster than all the approaches. – lakshmanaraj Jul 2 '09 at 7:11
26

The shortest answer: snprintf(0,0,"%+d",n)-1

  • 2
    How does this work? – Jorge Fernández Apr 13 '15 at 3:43
  • 2
    snprintf with n=0 does not store anything and allows a null buffer pointer; the return value is the number of characters that would have been written. The + modifier is used to print a sign (+ or -) even if the value is non-negative; subtracting one from the result discounts the sign from being counted as a digit. – R.. Apr 13 '15 at 5:29
  • 1
    From my (Debian Linux) system's man-page on snprintf: "Concerning the return value of snprintf(), SUSv2 and C99 contradict each other: when snprintf() is called with size=0 [size is the second argument above] then SUSv2 stipulates an unspecified return value less than 1, while C99 allows str to be NULL in this case, and gives the return value (as always) as the number of characters that would have been written in case the output string has been large enough." {SUS = Single UNIX Specification} – SlySven Jul 22 '16 at 21:59
  • 3
    @SlySven: SUSv2 is ancient and irrelevant. – R.. Jul 22 '16 at 22:26
  • Well Debian are known for being somewhat conservative and not being the fastest to take on-board new stuff. 8-P Thanks for your answer - I have used it in a FOSS project I'm coding for (and attributed it to here accordingly)...! – SlySven Jul 24 '16 at 4:29
8

Divide by 10 in a loop until the result reaches zero. The number of iterations will correspond to the number of decimal digits.

Assuming that you expect to get 0 digits in a zero value:

int countDigits( int value )
{
    int result = 0;
    while( value != 0 ) {
       value /= 10;
       result++;
    }
    return result;
}
  • floor(log10(abs(x)))+1 would be faster, but eduffy has already suggested that! :-) – Wim ten Brink Jul 1 '09 at 12:49
  • I'd be curious to see that timed. I'd almost think that an optimized series of if statements (based on maxint) may outperform a floating point logarithm (but I'm too lazy to test it myself). – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 12:52
  • It's never going to reach zero, is it? – John Pirie Jul 1 '09 at 12:53
  • @John Pirie: Why wouldn't it? I mean integer division and when applied iteratively to the same variable it will eventually give zero. – sharptooth Jul 1 '09 at 12:55
  • @JP, if you keep dividing an integer by 10, it will reach zero eventually. – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 12:56
6

You can do: floor (log10 (abs (x))) + 1 Or if you want to save on cycles you could just do comparisons

if(x<10)
  return 1;
if(x<100)
  return 2;
if(x<1000)
  return 3;
etc etc

This avoids any computationally expensive functions such as log or even multiplication or division. While it is inelegant this can be hidden by encapsulating it into a function. It isn't complex or difficult to maintain so I would not dismiss this approach on account of poor coding practice; I feel to do so would be throwing the baby out with the bath water.

  • 1
    or I could just throw up a dialog box and ask the user, heh – willc2 Jul 1 '09 at 13:26
  • 2
    And why the downvote here? This turns out to be blindingly fast. – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 13:37
  • large, chained if-blocks are code smell, and bad design. – abelenky Jul 1 '09 at 14:14
  • Says you! :-) – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 14:32
  • 2
    @David: Off the top of my head, logarithms take somewhere around 250-700 cycles depending on the cpu. Even if you figure each branch in this answer takes 25 cycles, you'd need 10-30 digits before it got slower than a logarithm, and that's the worst case. If your typical numbers are small, it's even better. – R.. May 18 '12 at 1:56
6

Constant-cost version that uses x86 assembly and a lookup table:

int count_bsr(int i) {
    struct {
            int max;
            int count;
    } static digits[32] = {
            { 9, 1 }, { 9, 1 }, { 9, 1 }, { 9, 1 },
            { 99, 2 }, { 99, 2 }, { 99, 2 },
            { 999, 3 }, { 999, 3 }, { 999, 3 },
            { 9999, 4 }, { 9999, 4 }, { 9999, 4 }, { 9999, 4 },
            { 99999, 5 }, { 99999, 5 }, { 99999, 5 },
            { 999999, 6 }, { 999999, 6 }, { 999999, 6 },
            { 9999999, 7 }, { 9999999, 7 }, { 9999999, 7 }, { 9999999, 7 },
            { 99999999, 8 }, { 99999999, 8 }, { 99999999, 8 },
            { 999999999, 9 }, { 999999999, 9 }, { 999999999, 9 },
            { INT_MAX, 10 }, { INT_MAX, 10 }
    };
        register const int z = 0;
        register unsigned log2;
        if (i < 0) i = -i;
        __asm__ __volatile__ (
                "bsr %1, %0;"  \
                "cmovz %2, %0;"\
                : "=r" (log2)  \
                : "rm" (i), "r"(z));
        return digits[log2].count + ( i > digits[log2].max );
}

Another one, with a smaller lookup table and a log10 approximation taken from here.

int count_bsr2( int i ) {
    static const unsigned limits[] =
            {0, 10, 100, 1000, 10000, 100000,
             1000000, 10000000, 100000000, 1000000000};
        register const int z = 0;
        register int l, log2;
        if (i < 0) i = -i;
        __asm__ __volatile__ (
                "bsr %1, %0;"  \
                "cmovz %2, %0;"\
                : "=r" (log2)  \
                : "rm" (i), "r"(z));
       l = (log2 + 1) * 1233 >> 12;
       return (l + ((unsigned)i >= limits[l]));
}

Both of these take advantage of the fact that on x86 -INT_MIN is equal to INT_MIN.

Update:

As per suggestion here are the timings for the count_bsr and a slightly faster 64-bit only count_bsr_mod routines compared to the binary search and binary chop algos using very nice paxdiablo's test program modified to generate sets with a random sign distribution. Tests were built with gcc 4.9.2 using "-O3 -falign-functions=16 -falign-jumps=16 -march=corei7-avx" options and executed on an otherwise quiescent Sandy Bridge system with turbo and sleep states off.

Time for               bsr mod:     270000  
Time for                   bsr:     340000  
Time for           binary chop:     800000  
Time for         binary search:     770000  
Time for     binary search mod:     470000  

Source for the test,

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <time.h>

#define numof(a) (sizeof(a) / sizeof(a[0]))

/* Random numbers and accuracy checks. */

static int rndnum[10000];
static int rt[numof(rndnum)];

/* All digit counting functions here. */

static int count_bchop (int n) {
    int r = 1;
    if (n < 0) n = (n == INT_MIN) ? INT_MAX : -n;
    if (n >= 100000000) {
        r += 8;
        n /= 100000000;
    }
    if (n >= 10000) {
        r += 4;
        n /= 10000;
    }
    if (n >= 100) {
        r += 2;
        n /= 100;
    }
    if (n >= 10)
        r++;

    return r;
}

static int count_bsearch(int i)
{
    if (i < 0)
    {
        if (i == INT_MIN)
            return 11; // special case for -2^31 because 2^31 can't fit in a two's complement 32-bit integer
        i = -i;
    }
    if              (i < 100000) {
        if          (i < 1000) {
            if      (i < 10)         return 1;
            else if (i < 100)        return 2;
            else                     return 3;
        } else {
            if      (i < 10000)      return 4;
            else                     return 5;
        }
    } else {
        if          (i < 10000000) {
            if      (i < 1000000)    return 6;
            else                     return 7;
        } else {
            if      (i < 100000000)  return 8;
            else if (i < 1000000000) return 9;
            else                     return 10;
        }
    }
}

// Integer log base 10, modified binary search.
static int count_bsearch_mod(int i) {
   unsigned x = (i >= 0) ? i : -i;
   if (x > 99)
      if (x > 999999)
         if (x > 99999999)
            return 9 + (x > 999999999);
         else
            return 7 + (x > 9999999);
      else
         if (x > 9999)
            return 5 + (x > 99999);
         else
            return 3 + (x > 999);
   else
         return 1 + (x > 9);
}

static int count_bsr_mod(int i) {
    struct {
            int m_count;
            int m_threshold;
    } static digits[32] =
    {
      { 1, 9 }, { 1, 9 }, { 1, 9 }, { 1, 9 },
      { 2, 99 }, { 2, 99 }, { 2, 99 },
      { 3, 999 }, { 3, 999 }, { 3, 999 },
      { 4, 9999 }, { 4, 9999 }, { 4, 9999 }, { 4, 9999 },
      { 5, 99999 }, { 5, 99999 }, { 5, 99999 },
      { 6, 999999 }, { 6, 999999 }, { 6, 999999 },
      { 7, 9999999 }, { 7, 9999999 }, { 7, 9999999 }, { 7, 9999999 },
      { 8, 99999999 }, { 8, 99999999 }, { 8, 99999999 },
      { 9, 999999999 }, { 9, 999999999 }, { 9, 999999999 },
      { 10, INT_MAX }, { 10, INT_MAX }
    };
        __asm__ __volatile__ (
            "cdq                    \n\t"
            "xorl %%edx, %0         \n\t"
            "subl %%edx, %0         \n\t"
            "movl %0, %%edx         \n\t"
            "bsrl %0, %0            \n\t"
            "shlq $32, %%rdx        \n\t"
            "movq %P1(,%q0,8), %q0  \n\t"
            "cmpq %q0, %%rdx        \n\t"
            "setg %%dl              \n\t"
            "addl %%edx, %0         \n\t"
                : "+a"(i)
                : "i"(digits)
                : "rdx", "cc"
        );
    return i;
}

static int count_bsr(int i) {
    struct {
            int max;
            int count;
    } static digits[32] = {
            { 9, 1 }, { 9, 1 }, { 9, 1 }, { 9, 1 },
            { 99, 2 }, { 99, 2 }, { 99, 2 },
            { 999, 3 }, { 999, 3 }, { 999, 3 },
            { 9999, 4 }, { 9999, 4 }, { 9999, 4 }, { 9999, 4 },
            { 99999, 5 }, { 99999, 5 }, { 99999, 5 },
            { 999999, 6 }, { 999999, 6 }, { 999999, 6 },
            { 9999999, 7 }, { 9999999, 7 }, { 9999999, 7 }, { 9999999, 7 },
            { 99999999, 8 }, { 99999999, 8 }, { 99999999, 8 },
            { 999999999, 9 }, { 999999999, 9 }, { 999999999, 9 },
            { INT_MAX, 10 }, { INT_MAX, 10 }
    };
        register const int z = 0;
        register unsigned log2;
        if (i < 0) i = -i;
        __asm__ __volatile__ (
                "bsr %1, %0;"  \
                "cmovz %2, %0;"\
                : "=r" (log2)  \
                : "rm" (i), "r"(z));
        return digits[log2].count + ( i > digits[log2].max );
}

/* Structure to control calling of functions. */

typedef struct {
    int (*fnptr)(int);
    const char *desc;
} tFn;

static tFn fn[] = {
 {   NULL,                              NULL },
 {   count_bsr_mod,  "              bsr mod" },
 {   count_bsr,      "                  bsr" },
 {   count_bchop,    "          binary chop" },
 {   count_bsearch,  "        binary search" },
 {   count_bsearch_mod,"    binary search mod"}
};
static clock_t clk[numof (fn)];

int main (int c, char *v[]) {
    int i, j, k, r;
    int s = 1;

    /* Test code:
        printf ("%11d %d\n", INT_MIN, count_bsearch(INT_MIN));
        //for (i = -1000000000; i != 0; i /= 10)
        for (i = -999999999; i != 0; i /= 10)
            printf ("%11d %d\n", i, count_bsearch(i));
        printf ("%11d %d\n", 0, count_bsearch(0));
        for (i = 1; i != 1000000000; i *= 10)
            printf ("%11d %d\n", i, count_bsearch(i));
        printf ("%11d %d\n", 1000000000, count_bsearch(1000000000));
        printf ("%11d %d\n", INT_MAX, count_bsearch(INT_MAX));
    return 0;
    /* */

    /* Randomize and create random pool of numbers. */

    int p, n;
    p = n = 0;
    srand (time (NULL));
    for (j = 0; j < numof (rndnum); j++) {
        rndnum[j] = ((rand() & 2) - 1) * rand();
    }
    rndnum[0] = INT_MAX;
    rndnum[1] = INT_MIN;

    /* For testing. */
    for (k = 0; k < numof (rndnum); k++) {
        rt[k] = (fn[1].fnptr)(rndnum[k]);
    }

    /* Test each of the functions in turn. */

    clk[0] = clock();
    for (i = 1; i < numof (fn); i++) {
        for (j = 0; j < 10000; j++) {
            for (k = 0; k < numof (rndnum); k++) {
                r = (fn[i].fnptr)(rndnum[k]);
                /* Test code:
                    if (r != rt[k]) {
                        printf ("Mismatch error [%s] %d %d %d %d\n",
                            fn[i].desc, k, rndnum[k], rt[k], r);
                        return 1;
                    }
                /* */
            }
        }
        clk[i] = clock();
    }

    /* Print out results. */

    for (i = 1; i < numof (fn); i++) {
        printf ("Time for %s: %10d\n", fn[i].desc, (int)(clk[i] - clk[i-1]));
    }

    return 0;
}
  • 1
    +1 for the most geeky answer. You should add performance figures to show how well it performs, especially compared to binary chop. – CoDEmanX Aug 16 '15 at 21:04
  • There is a bug in count_bsearch(): for the OP's semantics, it should return 10 for i == INT_MIN. – chqrlie Feb 19 '17 at 3:45
5

From Bit Twiddling Hacks :

Find integer log base 10 of an integer the obvious way

Note the ordering of comparisons in it.

4

I stumbled across this during a google search: http://www.hackersdelight.org/hdcodetxt/ilog.c.txt

A quick benchmark clearly showed the binary search methods winning. lakshmanaraj's code is quite good, Alexander Korobka's is ~30% faster, Deadcode's is a tiny bit faster still (~10%), but I found the following tricks from the above link give a further 10% improvement.

// Integer log base 10, modified binary search.
int ilog10c(unsigned x) {
   if (x > 99)
      if (x < 1000000)
         if (x < 10000)
            return 3 + ((int)(x - 1000) >> 31);
         // return 3 - ((x - 1000) >> 31);              // Alternative.
         // return 2 + ((999 - x) >> 31);               // Alternative.
         // return 2 + ((x + 2147482648) >> 31);        // Alternative.
         else
            return 5 + ((int)(x - 100000) >> 31);
      else
         if (x < 100000000)
            return 7 + ((int)(x - 10000000) >> 31);
         else
            return 9 + ((int)((x-1000000000)&~x) >> 31);
         // return 8 + (((x + 1147483648) | x) >> 31);  // Alternative.
   else
      if (x > 9)
            return 1;
      else
            return ((int)(x - 1) >> 31);
         // return ((int)(x - 1) >> 31) | ((unsigned)(9 - x) >> 31);  // Alt.
         // return (x > 9) + (x > 0) - 1;                             // Alt.
}

Note this is log 10, not number of digits, so digits = ilog10c(x)+1.

Doesn't support negatives, but that's easily fixed with a -.

4

Here is an unrolled binary search without any division or multiplication. Depending on the distribution of numbers given to it, it may or may not beat the other ones done with unrolled if statements, but should always beat the ones that use loops and multiplication/division/log10.

With a uniform distribution of random numbers encompassing the whole range, on my machine it averaged 79% of the execution time of paxdiablo's count_bchop(), 88% the time of count_ifs(), and 97% of the time of count_revifs().

With an exponential distribution (the probability of a number having n digits is equal to the that of it having m digits, where mn) count_ifs() and count_revifs() both beat my function. I'm not sure why at this point.

int count_bsearch(int i)
{
    if (i < 0)
    {
        if (i == INT_MIN)
            return 10; // special case for -2^31 because 2^31 can't fit in a two's complement 32-bit integer
        i = -i;
    }
    if              (i < 100000) {
        if          (i < 1000) {
            if      (i < 10)         return 1;
            else if (i < 100)        return 2;
            else                     return 3;
        } else {
            if      (i < 10000)      return 4;
            else                     return 5;
        }
    } else {
        if          (i < 10000000) {
            if      (i < 1000000)    return 6;
            else                     return 7;
        } else {
            if      (i < 100000000)  return 8;
            else if (i < 1000000000) return 9;
            else                     return 10;
        }
    }
}
  • That's funny... I wrote a comment about doing exactly this just before, after seeing the 'raw speed' version in paxdiablo's answer. Then I discovered you had written this answer about 15 minutes earlier. Oh well, +1 =) Note that you can change the boundaries to tweak the function's performance in favour of particular data ranges. – paddy Oct 26 '12 at 3:52
  • You've gotta be kidding me! What are the odds? All the other answers were posted over 3 years ago. Our stories are even a bit similar. I started programming in BASIC on an IBM XT when I was 8 years old. – Deadcode Oct 26 '12 at 3:58
  • I was looking at the "active posts" list. This showed up and looked interesting. I got down to paxdiablo's post, made a comment, then wandered off... Came back later and saw another modification so I got curious. It was yours. Do you think we're mutual doppelgangers? – paddy Oct 26 '12 at 4:04
  • There is a bug in count_bsearch(): for the OP's semantics, it should return 10 for i == INT_MIN. – chqrlie Feb 19 '17 at 3:40
2
    int n = 437788;
    int N = 1; 
    while (n /= 10) N++; 
  • What about negative numbers? – ChrisF Jul 1 '09 at 13:07
  • 1
    Will work okay for negative numbers too - will divide in a loop until n becomes zero and then the loop will stop. – sharptooth Jul 1 '09 at 13:16
  • 1
    negate it beforehand then, duh. – artificialidiot Jul 1 '09 at 13:18
  • No need for negation here. It will iterate until the result equals zero. – sharptooth Jul 1 '09 at 13:47
  • 1
    @ChrisF: The end-of-loop test expression in this code is an ASSIGNMENT operator, not a comparison! read it as: while(n = n/10, n!=0) - the last expression after a comma being the real end-of-loop test. – stormsoul Jul 1 '09 at 15:26
2
if (x == MININT) return 10;  //  abs(MININT) is not defined
x = abs (x);
if (x<10) return 1;
if (x<100) return 2;
if (x<1000) return 3;
if (x<10000) return 4;
if (x<100000) return 5;
if (x<1000000) return 6;
if (x<10000000) return 7;
if (x<100000000) return 8;
if (x<1000000000) return 9;
return 10; //max len for 32-bit integers

Very inelegant. But quicker than all the other solutions. Integer Division and FP logs are expensive to do. If performance isn't an issue, the log10 solution is my favorite.

  • That actually turns out to be the fastest method even for the worst case (2^32-1) - see my update fo timings. – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 13:33
  • But it is total code-smell, and not scalable or portable. – abelenky Jul 1 '09 at 14:13
  • 13
    I often suspect that "code smell" is a term trotted out by people who just don't like the code - it seems a very unscientific term. This code is perfectly readable (to me at least and to anyone else with half a brain if you add one simple comment line) and will outperform any other solution listed here (very important in the environment I was forged in). And the algorithm is scalable at O(log n) and portable if you just add more if statements to suit the environment you're working in. – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 14:27
  • 2
    The question is tagged C and math. Any solution is welcome, even the fastest. – Ben Jul 1 '09 at 14:44
  • 2
    It's fast because it is just one compare per digit. The Iterative solutions are one compare, one division, and one increment per digit. Integer division is expensive, 17 cycles on a C2D. log10 is well over 100 cycles. – Wayne Sheppard Jul 1 '09 at 15:27
2

Just a little adjust for C language:

floor( log10( abs( (number)?number:1 ) ) + 1 );
1

I know I'm late, but this code is +x10 faster than all other answers.

int digits(long long x)
{
    x < 0 ? x = -x : 0;
    return x < 10 ? 1 :
        x < 100 ? 2 :
        x < 1000 ? 3 :
        x < 10000 ? 4 :
        x < 100000 ? 5 :
        x < 1000000 ? 6 :
        x < 10000000 ? 7 :
        x < 100000000 ? 8 :
        x < 1000000000 ? 9 :
        x < 10000000000 ? 10 : 0;
}

...

int x = -937810;
printf("%d : %d digits\n", x, digits(x));

Out:

-937810 : 6 digits
0

DON'T use floor(log10(...)). These are floating-point functions, and slow ones, to add. I believe the fastest way would be this function:

int ilog10(int num)
{
   unsigned int num = abs(num);
   unsigned int x, i;
   for(x=10, i=1; ; x*=10, i++)
   {
      if(num < x)
         return i;
      if(x > INT_MAX/10)
         return i+1;
   }
}

Note that the binary search version some people suggested could be slower due to branch mispredictions.

EDIT:

I did some testing, and got some really interesting results. I timed my function together with all the functions tested by Pax, AND the binary search function given by lakshmanaraj. The testing is done by the following code snippet:

start = clock();
for(int i=0; i<10000; i++)
   for(int j=0; j<10000; j++)
      tested_func(numbers[j]);
end = clock();
tested_func_times[pass] = end-start;

Where the numbers[] array contains randomly generated numbers over the entire range of the int type (barring MIN_INT). The testing was repeated for each tested function on THE SAME numbers[] array. The entire test was made 10 times, with results averaged over all passes. The code was compiled with GCC 4.3.2 with -O3 optimization level.

Here are the results:

floating-point log10:     10340ms
recursive divide:         3391ms
iterative divide:         2289ms
iterative multiplication: 1071ms
unrolled tests:           859ms
binary search:            539ms

I must say I got really astonished. The binary search performed far better than I thought it would. I checked out how GCC compiled this code to asm. O_O. Now THIS is impressive. It got optimized much better than I thought possible, avoiding most branches in really clever ways. No wonder it is FAST.

  • Well, the fastest way turns out to be unrolling that loop into hand-optimized if statements. But you're dead right about the slowness of floating point. – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 14:34
  • @Pax: Floating point being slower than integer is one thing, and log10() and floor() being VERY slow is another. I was referring to the latter. – stormsoul Jul 1 '09 at 15:12
  • @Pax: Test this code and we'll see ;). – stormsoul Jul 1 '09 at 15:43
  • I'm going to vote this one up for the clever use of multiplication on the threshold rather than division on the value. I suppose you could invent a CPU where division was faster but I don't think I've ever seen one, and I'd probably fire the engineer that did it :-) – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 15:53
  • Leave it with me, @stormsoul, I'll get back to you in about 8 hours (it's midnight here in Oz). – paxdiablo Jul 1 '09 at 15:54
0

you can find number of digits in a number by using this formaula ceil (log10 (abs (x))) where ceil returns a integer number just greater than number

0

I guess, the simplest way would be:

 int digits = 0;
if (number < 0) digits = 1;
while (number) {
    number /= 10;
    digits++;
}

digits gives the answer.

  • 1
    This method will give incorrect results (off by one) for negative integers and this case of 0 it will count zero digits. – j b Oct 2 '14 at 10:18
0

A simple way to find the length (i.e number of digits) of signed integer is this:

while ( abs(n) > 9 )
{
    num /= 10;
    ++len;
}

Where n is the integer you want to find the length of and where len is equal to the number of digits in the integer. This works for both values of n (negative or positive).

The call on abs() is optional, if you are only working with positive integers.

0

For c#, here is a very fast and simple solution...

    private static int NumberOfPlaces(int n)
    {
       //fast way to get number of digits
       //converts to signed string with +/- intact then accounts for it by subtracting 1
       return n.ToString("+#;-#;+0").Length-1;
    }
-1
void main()
{     
    int a,i;
    printf("Enter the number :");       
    scanf("%d",&a);

    while(a>0)     
    {
        a=a/10;   
        i++;  
    }

    getch();
}

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