2

Let's say I have a Thing class, and I need to use some specific date validation that is provided by MySpecificDateValidation class that extends Zend_Validate_Abstract.

In the Thing class, I was thinking about dependency injection and wondering if this code:

public function SetDateBegin($dateBegin) {
    $dateValidator = new MySpecificDateValidation();
    if ($dateValidator->isValid($dateBegin)) {
        $this->dateBegin = $dateBegin;
    } else {
        throw new Exception /*...*/;
    }
}

should be refactored to:

public function SetDateBegin($dateBegin, MySpecificDateValidation $dateValidator) {
    if ($dateValidator->isValid($dateBegin)) {
        $this->dateBegin = $dateBegin;
    } else {
        throw new Exception /*...*/;
    }
}

or there is something like a few dependency that you can live with?

5
  • 1
    Probably better to pass the validators into the object on creation and not into each function. Will be a lot less code to fling around unless you have a compelling reason to avoid the extra baggage if SetDateBegin is never called.
    – DampeS8N
    May 21, 2012 at 17:49
  • but, in other hand, if I have a dozen atributes with half-dozen different validators, this (passing on creation) will bring an extra weight in constructor, won't it? May 21, 2012 at 18:05
  • 1
    @RodrigoAoCubo if your class has that many dependencies it needs re-factoring, it is doing too much! Having said that, where you pass in your dependencies depends on your use case.
    – vascowhite
    May 21, 2012 at 18:06
  • maybe I had "hyperboled" it a bit, or made a confusion in the way I described it... I wasn't talking about 12 parameters in one method with 6 different validators together, but a class with about 12 setters with a sort of different validators, not the same for all. does it turns it in something less nasty? :) May 21, 2012 at 18:19
  • Lol, a bit less nasty, but not much :)
    – vascowhite
    May 21, 2012 at 18:33

1 Answer 1

4

Your second option will be much easier to unit test as you will be able to mock the validator and inject the mocked object instead of the real one.

If you try to unit test the first option you end up testing the Thing class plus anything it depends on, such as the validator. If a unit test fails, you then have to track the failure through all the dependencies.

The point of dependency injection is to allow you to isolate your classes from their dependencies so you test each class in isolation.

So, from a testing point of view, you should inject all dependencies, always.

2
  • Ok, I understand that it (unit testing) is the main benefit. I believe I'm still trying to get used to the idea and leaving old bad habits behind... May 21, 2012 at 18:09
  • @RodrigoAoCubo Unit testing isn't the main benefit, it is essentially the only benefit. Everything else can be done more efficiently other ways but only via DI can you do all of those things with relative ease and also still Unit test with ease.
    – DampeS8N
    May 21, 2012 at 18:48

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