270

Suppose you have a simple block of code like this:

app.get('/', function(req, res){
    res.send('Hello World');
});

This function has two parameters, req and res, which represent the request and response objects respectively.

On the other hand, there are other functions with a third parameter called next. For example, lets have a look at the following code:

app.get('/users/:id?', function(req, res, next){ // Why do we need next?
    var id = req.params.id;
    if (id) {
        // do something
    } else {
        next(); // What is this doing?
    }
});

I can't understand what the point of next() is or why its being used. In that example, if id doesn't exist, what is next actually doing?

  • 11
    Next simply allows the next route handler in line to handle the request. In this case, if the user id exists, it will likely use res.send to complete the request. If it doesn't exist, there is likely another handler that will issue an error and complete the request then. – Dominic Barnes May 22 '12 at 4:13
  • 1
    so you're saying I have an app.post('/login',function(req,res)) after app.get('/users',function(req,res)) it will call login being the next route in the app.js file by calling next()? – Menztrual May 22 '12 at 4:19
  • 2
    No, you should refer to this portion of the Express.js documentation: expressjs.com/guide.html#passing-route control – Dominic Barnes May 22 '12 at 4:25
  • 2
    Basically, the next route to be run will be another one that the URL for the request matches. In this case, if another route was registered via app.get("/users"), then it will be run if handler above calls next. – Dominic Barnes May 22 '12 at 4:26
  • 3
    Next is basically just a callback. – Jonathan Ong Apr 28 '13 at 8:39
245

It passes control to the next matching route. In the example you give, for instance, you might look up the user in the database if an id was given, and assign it to req.user.

Below, you could have a route like:

app.get('/users', function(req, res) {
  // check for and maybe do something with req.user
});

Since /users/123 will match the route in your example first, that will first check and find user 123; then /users can do something with the result of that.

Route middleware is a more flexible and powerful tool, though, in my opinion, since it doesn't rely on a particular URI scheme or route ordering. I'd be inclined to model the example shown like this, assuming a Users model with an async findOne():

function loadUser(req, res, next) {
  if (req.params.userId) {
    Users.findOne({ id: req.params.userId }, function(err, user) {
      if (err) {
        next(new Error("Couldn't find user: " + err));
        return;
      }

      req.user = user;
      next();
    });
  } else {
    next();
  }
}

// ...

app.get('/user/:userId', loadUser, function(req, res) {
  // do something with req.user
});

app.get('/users/:userId?', loadUser, function(req, res) {
  // if req.user was set, it's because userId was specified (and we found the user).
});

// Pretend there's a "loadItem()" which operates similarly, but with itemId.
app.get('/item/:itemId/addTo/:userId', loadItem, loadUser, function(req, res) {
  req.user.items.append(req.item.name);
});

Being able to control flow like this is pretty handy. You might want to have certain pages only be available to users with an admin flag:

/**
 * Only allows the page to be accessed if the user is an admin.
 * Requires use of `loadUser` middleware.
 */
function requireAdmin(req, res, next) {
  if (!req.user || !req.user.admin) {
    next(new Error("Permission denied."));
    return;
  }

  next();
}

app.get('/top/secret', loadUser, requireAdmin, function(req, res) {
  res.send('blahblahblah');
});

Hope this gave you some inspiration!

  • so it just reduces a ton of code in the one route? – Menztrual May 22 '12 at 4:32
  • 4
    why sometimes you return next() but sometimes don't – John Jun 9 '15 at 15:02
  • 6
    @John: the return value is actually ignored; I'm just wanting to return there to ensure I don't call next() again. It'd be the same if I just used next(new Error(…)); return;. – Ashe Jun 9 '15 at 23:47
  • 1
    @level0: the return value is ignored; you can consider it shorthand for next(new Error(…)); return;. If we pass a value to next, it's unilaterally considered an error. I haven't looked into the express code too much, but dig around and you'll find what you need :) – Ashe May 3 '16 at 22:33
  • 1
    @level0: (I've changed return next(…); to next(…); return; so it's less confusing.) – Ashe May 3 '16 at 22:34
72

I also had problem understanding next() , but this helped

var app = require("express")();

app.get("/", function(httpRequest, httpResponse, next){
    httpResponse.write("Hello");
    next(); //remove this and see what happens 
});

app.get("/", function(httpRequest, httpResponse, next){
    httpResponse.write(" World !!!");
    httpResponse.end();
});

app.listen(8080);
  • 3
    Very succinct! Thanks! But how do you make sure that the first .get is called and not the 2nd one? – JohnnyQ Feb 28 '17 at 14:27
  • 14
    @JohnnyQ It will be top to bottom execution – Tapash Mar 14 '17 at 7:07
44

Before understanding next, you need to have a little idea of Request-Response cycle in node though not much in detail. It starts with you making an HTTP request for a particular resource and it ends when you send a response back to the user i.e. when you encounter something like res.send(‘Hello World’);

let’s have a look at a very simple example.

app.get('/hello', function (req, res, next) {
  res.send('USER')
})

Here we do not need next(), because resp.send will end the cycle and hand over the control back to the route middleware.

Now let’s take a look at another example.

app.get('/hello', function (req, res, next) {
  res.send("Hello World !!!!");
});

app.get('/hello', function (req, res, next) {
  res.send("Hello Planet !!!!");
});

Here we have 2 middleware functions for the same path. But you always gonna get the response from the first one. Because that is mounted first in the middleware stack and res.send will end the cycle.

But what if we always do not want the “Hello World !!!!” response back. For some conditions we may want the "Hello Planet !!!!" response. Let’s modify the above code and see what happens.

app.get('/hello', function (req, res, next) {
  if(some condition){
    next();
    return;
  }
  res.send("Hello World !!!!");  
});

app.get('/hello', function (req, res, next) {
  res.send("Hello Planet !!!!");
});

What’s the next doing here. And yes you might have gusses. It’s gonna skip the first middleware function if the condition is true and invoke the next middleware function and you will have the "Hello Planet !!!!" response.

So, next pass the control to the next function in the middleware stack.

What if the first middleware function does not send back any response but do execute a piece of logic and then you get the response back from second middleware function.

Something like below:-

app.get('/hello', function (req, res, next) {
  // Your piece of logic
  next();
});

app.get('/hello', function (req, res, next) {
  res.send("Hello !!!!");
});

In this case you need both the middleware functions to be invoked. So, the only way you reach the second middleware function is by calling next();

What if you do not make a call to next. Do not expect the second middleware function to get invoked automatically. After invoking the first function your request will be left hanging. The second function will never get invoked and you will not get back the response.

  • So next() performs like a goto with a hard-wired label? That is, in your third snippet, once you call next(), res.send("Hello World !!!!"); would never be executed? I noticed that @Ashe always had a return; after next calls that had code in the same execution tree... Guess I could always just check in express, huh? /runs over to his text editor ;) – ruffin May 7 '18 at 14:49
  • @ruffin yes you can think of next akin to a goto. but next knows where to go to unlike goto which requires a label. Next will pass the control to the next middleware function. Also, you can name 'next' anything you like. It's just a label here. But the best practice is to use the name 'next' – Mav55 May 7 '18 at 15:02
  • 2
    Okay, looks like that's not accurate. I tried the code (pastebin here), and the code after the next() call is called. In this case, past the next() call is written to the console, and then I get a Error: Can't set headers after they are sent. error, as the second res.send is called, though unsuccessfully. The code flow does return after the next() call, which makes @Ashe's returns (or other logic management) important. – ruffin May 7 '18 at 15:13
  • 2
    @ruffin, yeah you are right. We need a return statement after the next() to skip the execution of the remaining statements. thanks for pointing out that. – Mav55 May 7 '18 at 18:33
  • one more question... is next() basically a synonym of the often used "done()" ? is it the same? – user2883596 Oct 11 '18 at 7:52
8

Next is used to pass control to the next middleware function. If not the request will be left hanging or open.

4

Calling this function invokes the next middleware function in the app. The next() function is not a part of the Node.js or Express API, but is the third argument that is passed to the middleware function. The next() function could be named anything, but by convention it is always named “next”.

2

Executing the next function notifies the server that you are done with this middleware step and it can execute next step in the chain.

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