61

I try to build fluid layout using percentages as widths. Do do so i tried this:

<div style="width:50%; display:inline-table;">A</div>
<div style="width:50%; display:inline-table;">B</div>

In that case they wont stand in one line, but if i remove line break between them, like this:

    <div style="width:50%; display:inline-table;">A</div><div style="width:50%;   display:inline-table;">B</div>

then it works fine. Where is the problem? How can i do someting like that but without using absolute position and float.

p.s. sorry for english. p.s.s. i hope i good explain my problem

1
  • Just add box-sizing (CSS3) to each DIV: box-sizing: border-box;
    – Zaur_M
    Aug 7, 2015 at 9:41

10 Answers 10

86

The problem is that when something is inline, every whitespace is treated as an actual space. So it will influence the width of the elements. I recommend using float or display: inline-block. (Just don't leave any whitespace between the divs).

Here is a demo:

div {
  background: red;
}
div + div {
  background: green;
}
<div style="width:50%; display:inline-block;">A</div><div style="width:50%; display:inline-block;">B</div>

7
  • Cool, seems work. But why this code doesnt need clear:both after ??
    – Chris
    May 22, 2012 at 9:02
  • does not work in IE7, please see my answer withh floats instead :) May 22, 2012 at 9:13
  • @OptimusCrime he was very explicit in the question. "How can i do someting like that but without using absolute position and float." +the fluid layout seams to be pretty important there.
    – meo
    May 22, 2012 at 9:28
  • Cute but if those divs have a border or padding it will not work. Jan 2, 2014 at 12:14
  • 3
    @RuiMarques you never heard of box-sizing: border-box do you :D
    – meo
    Mar 26, 2014 at 9:25
33

The problem is that if you have a new line between them in the HTML, then you get a space between them when you use inline-table or inline-block

50% + 50% + that space > 100% and that's why the second one ends up below the first one

Solutions:

<div></div><div></div>

or

<div>
</div><div>
</div>

or

<div></div><!--
--><div></div>

The idea is not to have any kind of space between the first closing div tag and the second opening div tag in your HTML.

PS - I would also use inline-block instead of inline-table for this

3
  • 2
    Beating my head against a wall for the last few hrs. Thanks... Solution 3 was it and now you wrote it I see it as well in the example code. Is there a write up anywhere about this little situation? Oct 12, 2014 at 11:30
  • 2
    Why do I find myself needing this answer again every few months... Oh right, because it's ignorant that it works like this! Jun 13, 2017 at 18:25
  • Amazing. Thank you! Apr 11, 2018 at 4:16
28

Wrap them around a div with the following CSS

.div_wrapper{
    white-space: nowrap;
}
2
  • 2
    Excellent. The cleanest result. May 22, 2017 at 17:03
  • This makes the child divs appear to the right of the parent div for me.
    – martin36
    Jun 9, 2018 at 14:41
22

Give this parent DIV font-size:0. Write like this:

<div style="font-size:0">
  <div style="width:50%; display:inline-table;font-size:15px">A</div>
  <div style="width:50%; display:inline-table;font-size:15px">B</div>
</div>
2
  • 1
    For that you can use word-spacing:-1em; OR letter-spacing:-1em; instead of font-size:0; :)
    – sandeep
    May 22, 2012 at 9:36
  • The em hack makes the 2 divs combined width < 100%.
    – Ashley
    Sep 25, 2014 at 15:07
17

How can i do something like that but without using absolute position and float?

Apart from using the inline-block approach (as mentioned in other answers) here are some other approaches:

1) CSS tables (FIDDLE)

.container {
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
}
.container div {
  display: table-cell;
}
<div class="container">
  <div>A</div>
  <div>B</div>
</div>

2) Flexbox (FIDDLE)

.container {
  display: flex;
}
.container div {
  flex: 1;
}
<div class="container">
  <div>A</div>
  <div>B</div>
</div>

For a reference, this CSS-tricks post seems to sum up the various approaches to acheive this.

1
  • In my opinion, the best 2 options. Thumb up!
    – dragoweb
    Oct 15, 2020 at 21:21
3

CSS Flexboxes

Simple modern solution. Better than HTML tables!

.container {
  display: flex;
}
.container div {
  flex: auto; /* also 1 or 50% */
}
<div class="container">
  <div>A</div>
  <div>B</div>
</div>

Alternative: CSS Grids

.container {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: 1fr 1fr; /* also 50% */
}
<div class="container">
  <div>A</div>
  <div>B</div>
</div>

1
<div id="wrapper" style="width: 400px">
    <div id="left" style="float: left; width: 200px;">Left</div>
    <div id="right" style="float: right; width: 200px;">Left</div>
    <div style="clear: both;"></div>
</div>

I know this question wanted inline block, but try to view http://jsfiddle.net/N9mzE/1/ in IE 7 (the oldest browser supported where I work). The divs are not side by side.

OP said he did not want to use floats because he did not like them. Well...in my opinion, making good webpages that does not look weird in any browsers should be the maingoal, and you do this by using floats.

Honestly, I can see the problem. Floats are fantastic.

1
  • 1
    i personally hate floats and think inline-block is a much cleaner way to go.. no additional markup. And you can make it work in IE to: display:inline; zoom: 1; et voilà
    – meo
    May 22, 2012 at 9:33
0

basically inline-table is for element table, I guess what you really need here is inline-block, if you have to use inline-table anyway, try it this way:

<div style="width:50%; display:inline-table;">A</div><!--
--><div style="width:50%; display:inline-table;">B</div>
1
  • inline block does not change the problem, its the whitespace, as soon something is inline, every space counts... thats why your trick with the comment is pretty nice, but I'm not sure if this works in IE
    – meo
    May 22, 2012 at 9:05
0

Sorry but all the answers I see here are either hacky or fail if you sneeze a little harder.

If you use a table you can (if you wish) add a space between the divs, set borders, padding...

<table width="100%" cellspacing="0">
    <tr>
        <td style="width:50%;">A</td>
        <td style="width:50%;">B</td>            
    </tr>
</table>

Check a more complete example here: http://jsfiddle.net/qPduw/5/

4
  • True, but so is using tables for layout, they are meant for data structure. Oct 15, 2017 at 8:21
  • CSS grid and flexbox replace using tables
    – qwr
    Aug 4, 2021 at 9:46
  • Yes dude, in my defense this answer is from 2014 and Grid was only available in browsers in 2017, so... ;) Aug 4, 2021 at 10:41
  • supposedly flexbox was available, though probably no IE support
    – qwr
    Aug 4, 2021 at 19:28
-1

The problem you run into when setting width to 50% is the rounding of subpixels. If the width of your container is i.e. 99 pixels, a width of 50% can result in 2 containers of 50 pixels each.

Using float is probably easiest, and not such a bad idea. See this question for more details on how to fix the problem then.

If you don't want to use float, try using a width of 49%. This will work cross-browser as far as I know, but is not pixel-perfect..

html:

<div id="a">A</div>
<div id="b">B</div>

css:

#a, #b {
    width: 49%;
    display: inline-block; 
}
#a {background-color: red;}
#b {background-color: blue;}
0

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