60

I'm getting started developing for the iPhone and as such I am looking at different tutorials online as well as trying some different things out myself. Currently, I'm trying to create a countdown until midnight. To get the number of hour, minutes, and seconds, I do the following (which I found somewhere):

NSDate* now = [NSDate date];

int hour = 23 - [[now dateWithCalendarFormat:nil timeZone:nil] hourOfDay];
int min = 59 - [[now dateWithCalendarFormat:nil timeZone:nil] minuteOfHour];
int sec = 59 - [[now dateWithCalendarFormat:nil timeZone:nil] secondOfMinute];
countdownLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02d:%02d:%02d", hour, min,sec];

However, each place I use -dateWithCalendarFormat:timeZone: I get the following error:

warning: 'NSDate' may not respond to '-dateWithCalendarFormat:timeZone:'
(Messages without a matching method signature will be assumed to return 'id' and accept '...' as arguments.)
warning: no '-hourOfDay' method found
error: invalid operands to binary - (have 'int' and 'id')

This seems like something very simple. What am I missing?

Also, I've noticed at different places and at different times the asterisk (*) is located either right after the time NSDate* now or right before the variable NSDate *now. What is the difference in the two and why would you use one versus the other?

14 Answers 14

59

You have problems with iOS 4.2? Use this Code:

NSDate *currDate = [NSDate date];
NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc]init];
[dateFormatter setDateFormat:@"dd.MM.YY HH:mm:ss"];
NSString *dateString = [dateFormatter stringFromDate:currDate];
NSLog(@"%@",dateString);

-->20.01.2011 10:36:02

1
  • 5
    actually YY will output the year in 2 digits. YYYY will output the year in 4 digits.
    – Bot
    Jan 24 '12 at 20:10
48

You must use the following:

NSCalendar *gregorian = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar];
NSDateComponents *dateComponents = [gregorian components:(NSHourCalendarUnit  | NSMinuteCalendarUnit | NSSecondCalendarUnit) fromDate:yourDateHere];
NSInteger hour = [dateComponents hour];
NSInteger minute = [dateComponents minute];
NSInteger second = [dateComponents second];
[gregorian release];

There is no difference between NSDate* now and NSDate *now, it's just a matter of preference. From the compiler perspective, nothing changes.

2
  • Why do you have to use NSCalendar is this a recent change? There is a lot of code out there that is using NSDate for these things.
    – Jason
    Jul 1 '09 at 17:40
  • 2
    Jason: NSDate is still there. You're using NSCalendarDate (that's what -dateWithCalendarFormat:timeZone: returns), which is slated for deprecation and doesn't exist on the iPhone. Jul 2 '09 at 2:32
21

You can also use:


CFGregorianDate currentDate = CFAbsoluteTimeGetGregorianDate(CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent(), CFTimeZoneCopySystem());
countdownLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02d:%02d:%02.0f", currentDate.hour, currentDate.minute, currentDate.second];
CFRelease(currentDate); // Don't forget this! VERY important

I think this has the following advantages:

  1. No direct memory allocation.
  2. Seconds is a double instead of an integer.
  3. No message calls.
  4. Faster.
2
  • 1
    Opps you forgot to add "@" on your stringWithFormat. Anyways thanks for this.
    – drexsien
    Dec 14 '11 at 9:37
  • You have to release the reference returned from CFTimeZoneCopySystem(), otherwise you get a memory leak.
    – brutella
    Jul 31 '12 at 7:53
12

// you can get current date/time with the following code:

    NSDate* date = [NSDate date];
    NSDateFormatter* formatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
    NSTimeZone *destinationTimeZone = [NSTimeZone systemTimeZone];
    formatter.timeZone = destinationTimeZone;
    [formatter setDateStyle:NSDateFormatterLongStyle];
    [formatter setDateFormat:@"MM/dd/yyyy hh:mma"];
    NSString* dateString = [formatter stringFromDate:date];
5

Replace this:

NSDate* now = [NSDate date];
int hour = 23 - [[now dateWithCalendarFormat:nil timeZone:nil] hourOfDay];
int min = 59 - [[now dateWithCalendarFormat:nil timeZone:nil] minuteOfHour];
int sec = 59 - [[now dateWithCalendarFormat:nil timeZone:nil] secondOfMinute];
countdownLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02d:%02d:%02d", hour, min,sec];

With this:

NSDate* now = [NSDate date];
NSCalendar *gregorian = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar];
NSDateComponents *dateComponents = [gregorian components:(NSHourCalendarUnit  | NSMinuteCalendarUnit | NSSecondCalendarUnit) fromDate:now];
NSInteger hour = [dateComponents hour];
NSInteger minute = [dateComponents minute];
NSInteger second = [dateComponents second];
[gregorian release];
countdownLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02d:%02d:%02d", hour, minute, second];
3
  • fromDate:now doesn't work for me. The identifier now isn't defined or whatever. How do you initialize it with the current date?
    – i_am_jorf
    Oct 10 '11 at 16:47
  • Ah, [NSDate initWithTimeIntervalSinceNow:0] seems to be the way.
    – i_am_jorf
    Oct 10 '11 at 17:20
  • Actually [NSDate init] will create one with the current time.
    – i_am_jorf
    Oct 11 '11 at 15:29
4

You need to do something along the lines of the following:

NSDate *now = [NSDate date];
NSCalendar *calendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
NSDateComponents *components = [calendar components:NSHourCalendarUnit fromDate:now];
NSLog(@"%d", [components hour]);

And so on.

4

Also, I've noticed at different places and at different times the asterisk (*) is located either right after the time NSDate* now or right before the variable NSDate *now. What is the difference in the two and why would you use one versus the other?

The compiler doesn't care, but putting the asterisk before the space can be misleading. Here's my example:

int* a, b;

What is the type of b?

If you guessed int *, you're wrong. It's just int.

The other way makes this slightly clearer by keeping the * next to the variable it belongs to:

int *a, b;

Of course, there are two ways that are even clearer than that:

int b, *a;

int *a;
int b;
1
  • Yes, this is a good argument for either: always attach the * to the variable name; or never declare two variables on the same line. Personally, since I prefer to think of the "pointer to" as part of the type, I choose the latter solution, but people should definitely be aware of this issue. Jul 2 '09 at 3:15
1

Here's another way:

NSDate *now = [NSDate date];

//maybe not 100% approved, but it works in English.  You could localize if necessary
NSDate *midnight = [NSDate dateWithNaturalLanguageString:@"midnight tomorrow"]; 

//num of seconds between mid and now
NSTimeInterval timeInt = [midnight timeIntervalSinceDate:now];
int hours = (int) timeInt/3600;
int minutes = ((int) timeInt % 3600) / 60;
int seconds = (int) timeInt % 60;

You lose subsecond precision with the cast of the NSTimeInterval to an int, but that shouldn't matter.

1
  • On second look, the iPhone SDK may not have -(NSDate) dateWithNaturalLanguageString: (NSString *) str method so this may be a Leopard/Tiger only solution. Sorry Jul 1 '09 at 19:40
1

NSDate* now and NSDate *now are the same thing: a pointer to an NSDate object.

You probably want to use descriptionWithCalendarFormat:timeZone:locale: rather than dateWithCalendarFormat: — the latter returns an NSCalendarDate, which the docs say is scheduled to be deprecated at some point.

1

Original poster - the way you're determining seconds until midnight won't work on a day when daylight savings starts or ends. Here's a chunk of code which shows how to do it... It'll be in number of seconds (an NSTimeInterval); you can do the division/modulus/etc to get down to whatever you need.

NSDateComponents *dc = [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] components:NSDayCalendarUnit|NSMonthCalendarUnit|NSYearCalendarUnit fromDate:[NSDate date]];
[dc setDay:dc.day + 1];
NSDate *midnightDate = [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] dateFromComponents:dc];
NSLog(@"Now: %@, Tonight Midnight: %@, Hours until midnight: %.1f", [NSDate date], midnightDate, [midnightDate timeIntervalSinceDate:[NSDate date]] / 60.0 / 60.0);
0

There is no difference in the location of the asterisk (at in C, which Obj-C is based on, it doesn't matter). It is purely preference (style).

0

It took me a while to locate why the sample application works but mine don't.

The library (Foundation.Framework) that the author refer to is the system library (from OS) where the iphone sdk (I am using 3.0) is not support any more.

Therefore the sample application (from about.com, http://www.appsamuck.com/day1.html) works but ours don't.

1
  • Foundation is still part of the iPhone SDK. You really can't go without it. What's missing is NSCalendarDate, which has never been available on the iPhone (as far as I know). Aug 15 '09 at 18:22
0
CFGregorianDate currentDate = CFAbsoluteTimeGetGregorianDate(CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent(), CFTimeZoneCopySystem());
countdownLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02d:%02d:%2.0f", currentDate.hour, currentDate.minute, currentDate.second];

Mark was right this code is MUCH more efficient to manage dates hours min and secs. But he forgot the @ at the beginning of format string declaration.

1
  • 1
    Don't forget the 0 in front of the third 2, while you're at it. Otherwise, seconds fewer than 10 will come out as (for example) “:6”. Apr 8 '10 at 16:10
0
+ (NSString *)displayCurrentTimeWithAMPM 
{
    NSDateFormatter *outputFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
    [outputFormatter setDateFormat:@"h:mm aa"];

    NSString *dateTime = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@",[outputFormatter stringFromDate:[NSDate date]]];

    return dateTime;
}

return 3:33 AM

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