4

In PHP I would like to know what will be the method called by SOAP. Here is a sample to understand...

$soapserver = new SoapServer();
$soapserver->setClass('myClass');
$soapserver->handle();

What I would like to know is the name of the method that will be executed in handle()

Thank you !!

3
  • why dont you take a look at http://php.net/manual/en/soapserver.handle.php
    – jugnu
    Commented May 22, 2012 at 15:40
  • @jugnu I've already seen it, and was hoping there was an other way than parsing the XML by hand to find the answer (then the XML will be parsed twice for the same request)
    – Guile
    Commented May 22, 2012 at 15:43
  • For people searching Google for debugging solutions for this lovely PHP extension, someone shared a blog post (on SO? the man pages?) with a fantastic, yet straightforward, extension of the SoapServer that offers a bevy of debugging information. Check it out: blog.mayflower.de/…
    – Eric L.
    Commented Jan 21, 2014 at 16:18

4 Answers 4

11

In my opinion, the cleanest and most elegant way to access the called operation's name in this situation would be using some kind of Wrapper or Surrogate design pattern. Depending on Your intent You would use either the Decorator or the Proxy.

As an example, let's say We want to dynamically add some additional functionality to our Handler object without touching the class itself. This allows for keeping the Handler class cleaner and, thus, more focused on its direct responsibility. Such functionality could be logging of methods and their parameters or implementing some kind of caching mechanism. For this We will use the Decorator design pattern. Instead of doing this:

class MyHandlerClass
{
    public function operation1($params)
    {
        // does some stuff here
    }

    public function operation2($params)
    {
        // does some other stuff here
    }
}

$soapserver = new SoapServer(null, array('uri' => "http://test-uri/"));
$soapserver->setClass('MyHandlerClass');
$soapserver->handle();

We'll do the following:

class MyHandlerClassDecorator
{
    private $decorated = null;

    public function __construct(MyHandlerClass $decorated)
    {
        $this->decorated = $decorated;
    }

    public function __call($method, $params)
    {
        // do something with the $method and $params

        // then call the real $method
        if (method_exists($this->decorated, $method)) {
            return call_user_func_array(
                array($this->decorated, $method), $params);
        } else {
            throw new BadMethodCallException();
        }
    }
}

$soapserver = new SoapServer(null, array('uri' => "http://test-uri/"));
$soapserver->setObject(new MyHandlerClassDecorator(new MyHandlerClass()));
$soapserver->handle();

If You want to control the access to the Handler's operations, for instance, in order to impose access rights use the Proxy design pattern.

0
1

I know this is an old post, but someone could make use of this solution. It should be possible to extract data from raw HTTP POST data. You cannot use $_POST, because it's empty but you can use predefined variable $HTTP_RAW_POST_DATA which contains string with SOAP request in XML format.

The method name should be in first node of <soapenv:Body> tag like this:

<!--
    ...
    XML header, SOAP header etc.
    ...
-->
<soapenv:Body>
   <urn:methodName soapenv:encodingStyle="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/encoding/">
      <param1 xsi:type="xsd:string" xs:type="type:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2000/XMLSchema-instance">param1 value</param1>
      <param2 xsi:type="xsd:string" xs:type="type:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2000/XMLSchema-instance">param2 value</param2>
   </urn:methodName>
</soapenv:Body>
<!--
    ...
-->

You could probably parse it with something like SimpleXML or maybe use some regular expresion to get methodName but remember that the string urn: is a namespace defined in the header and therefore it could be anything.

0

Although not the nicest way, you can use this http://danpolant.com/use-the-output-buffer-to-debug-a-soap-server/ somehow.

For the quick and very dirty approach (please use this only for a one-time debug and not in production code!): just assign a global variable with the name of each SOAP method in the method bodies and do whatever you want with it after the SoapServer does its job, as described in the above link. Something like this (untested code):

$method = "";
class test
{
    function call1()
    {
        global $method; $method = "call1";
    }
}
ob_start();
$soapserver = new SoapServer();
$soapserver->setClass('test');
$soapserver->handle();

$mystring = ob_get_contents(); // retrieve all output thus far
ob_end_clean ();               // stop buffering
log($mystring);                // log output
log($method);                  // log method
echo $mystring;                // now send it
4
  • Thank you! I am looking for a more dynamic solution for production though. Nevertheless that is a neat way to be fast and easy :-) Thx!
    – Guile
    Commented May 23, 2012 at 7:12
  • In this case, I think you will need to do a bit more digging, because, as far as I know, SoapServer does not provide this functionality. Anyway, there are lots of details about this class that are undocumented and 3 years ago, when I was using it, I ended up digging in the PHP code to get a grip on them. Commented May 23, 2012 at 7:36
  • By the way, in order to avoid the messy global variable in the solution that I provided, I think you could just use a static public member in myClass, which you overwrite each time a method is called. Afterwards, you can just use it like so: myClass::$myStatic. If you really want to implement advanced debugging, then maybe you should look into extending the SoapServer class, which is probably the best thing you can do: blog.mayflower.de/archives/… Commented May 23, 2012 at 7:41
  • I just saw an even simpler extension of the SoapServer class here: php.net/manual/en/soapserver.handle.php#94630 (comment by Artur Graniszewski) that you could use. Commented May 23, 2012 at 7:43
0

Usually (but not always, depends on the client) $_SERVER['HTTP_SOAPACTION'] is set and you can get the name of the called method from it.

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