55

After parsing my file " s" contains AttributeGet:1,16,10106,10111

So I need to get all the numbers after colon in the attributeIDGet List. I know there are several ways to do it. But is there any way we can Directly convert List<String> to List<Integer>. As the below code complains about Type mismatch, so I tried to do the Integer.parseInt, but I guess this will not work for List. Here s is String.

private static List<Integer> attributeIDGet = new ArrayList<Integer>();

if(s.contains("AttributeGet:")) {
    attributeIDGet = Arrays.asList(s.split(":")[1].split(","));
}

13 Answers 13

65

No, you need to loop over the array

for(String s : strList) intList.add(Integer.valueOf(s));
  • 4
    What you wrote is effectively looping over the values. But it's an elegant solution, nonetheless. Just to add to that. With the new lambda methods. intList.addAll(strList.stream().map(Integer::valueOf).collect(Collectors.toList())); – frugalcoder Jun 7 '16 at 9:32
  • 1
    Or even strList.foreach(s->intList.add(Integer.valueOf(s)); – Heisenberg Jul 17 '16 at 18:35
  • 3
    Fast forward 5 years and there are now answers below that use Java 8 streams to do this in one line without using a loop. – Catfish Apr 7 '17 at 15:27
  • You can use Lambda to convert this list – realPK Jun 25 '19 at 22:08
54

Using Java8:

stringList.stream().map(Integer::parseInt).collect(Collectors.toList());
  • if send StringList to method (List<Interger>) can not. I think need create new List<Interger> and loop – Adam Jul 7 '17 at 9:28
  • Best answer for after J8. – Leon Dec 8 '17 at 10:54
  • @Jagadeesh: Integer::parseInt throws a NumberFormatException if the string is not an integer. You can filter out a non-integer elements using for example StringUtils::isNumeric from Apache Commons. – Dawid Stępień Sep 11 '19 at 8:46
10

Using lambda:

strList.stream().map(org.apache.commons.lang3.math.NumberUtils::toInt).collect(Collectors.toList());

9

Guava Converters do the trick.

import com.google.common.base.Splitter;
import com.google.common.primitives.Longs;

final Iterable<Long> longIds = 
    Longs.stringConverter().convertAll(
        Splitter.on(',').trimResults().omitEmptyStrings()
            .splitToList("1,2,3"));
8

No, you will have to iterate over each element:

for(String number : numbers) {
   numberList.add(Integer.parseInt(number)); 
}

The reason this happens is that there is no straightforward way to convert a list of one type into any other type. Some conversions are not possible, or need to be done in a specific way. Essentially the conversion depends on the objects involved and the context of the conversion so there is no "one size fits all" solution. For example, what if you had a Car object and a Person object. You can't convert a List<Car> into a List<Person> directly since it doesn't really make sense.

7

If you use Google Guava library this is what you can do, see Lists#transform

    String s = "AttributeGet:1,16,10106,10111";


    List<Integer> attributeIDGet = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    if(s.contains("AttributeGet:")) {
        List<String> attributeIDGetS = Arrays.asList(s.split(":")[1].split(","));
        attributeIDGet =
        Lists.transform(attributeIDGetS, new Function<String, Integer>() {
            public Integer apply(String e) {
                return Integer.parseInt(e);
            };
        });
    }

Yep, agree with above answer that's it's bloated, but stylish. But it's just another way.

4

Why don't you use stream to convert List of Strings to List of integers? like below

List<String> stringList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList("10", "30", "40",
            "50", "60", "70"));
List<Integer> integerList = stringList.stream()
            .map(Integer::valueOf).collect(Collectors.toList());

complete operation could be something like this

String s = "AttributeGet:1,16,10106,10111";
List<Integer> integerList = (s.startsWith("AttributeGet:")) ?
    Arrays.asList(s.replace("AttributeGet:", "").split(","))
    .stream().map(Integer::valueOf).collect(Collectors.toList())
    : new ArrayList<Integer>();
3

If you're allowed to use lambdas from Java 8, you can use the following code sample.

final String text = "1:2:3:4:5";
final List<Integer> list = Arrays.asList(text.split(":")).stream()
  .map(s -> Integer.parseInt(s))
  .collect(Collectors.toList());
System.out.println(list);

No use of external libraries. Plain old new Java!

  • I am getting this syntax error: Type mismatch: cannot convert from String to int inside map function. Can you plz help me with this – Sonal Maheshwari May 12 '14 at 15:30
  • @SonalMaheshwari What version of Java are you using (and on what environment)? I'm on 1.8.0_05 on Mac OS X. Can you also provide a SSCCE (on pastebin or an equivalent)? – javatarz May 13 '14 at 3:49
  • Best answer here – Kyle Bridenstine Sep 15 '17 at 16:14
  • Thanks @Mr.Tea :) – javatarz Sep 20 '17 at 13:38
2

You can use the Lambda functions of Java 8 to achieve this without looping

    String string = "1, 2, 3, 4";
    List<Integer> list = Arrays.asList(string.split(",")).stream().map(s -> Integer.parseInt(s.trim())).collect(Collectors.toList());
1

No, there is no way (that I know of), of doing that in Java.

Basically you'll have to transform each entry from String to Integer.

What you're looking for could be achieved in a more functional language, where you could pass a transformation function and apply it to every element of the list... but such is not possible (it would still apply to every element in the list).

Overkill:

You can, however use a Function from Google Guava (http://docs.guava-libraries.googlecode.com/git/javadoc/com/google/common/base/Function.html) to simulate a more functional approach, if that is what you're looking for.

If you're worried about iterating over the list twice, then instead of split use a Tokenizer and transform each integer token to Integer before adding to the list.

  • Using Function here is way overkill. – Louis Wasserman May 22 '12 at 17:12
  • I know, it won't achieve anything in terms of eficiency and it is overkill, I only wanted to point it out as a way of simulating a more "functional" approach. Unfortunately, you're only mimicking that behavior and usually end up with bloated code. – pcalcao May 22 '12 at 17:15
0

Here is another example to show power of Guava. Although, this is not the way I write code, I wanted to pack it all together to show what kind of functional programming Guava provides for Java.

Function<String, Integer> strToInt=new Function<String, Integer>() {
    public Integer apply(String e) {
         return Integer.parseInt(e);
    }
};
String s = "AttributeGet:1,16,10106,10111";

List<Integer> attributeIDGet =(s.contains("AttributeGet:"))?
  FluentIterable
   .from(Iterables.skip(Splitter.on(CharMatcher.anyOf(";,")).split(s)), 1))
   .transform(strToInt)
   .toImmutableList():
   new ArrayList<Integer>();
0

You can consider code in my repo.

https://github.com/mohamedanees6/JavaUtils/wiki/CollectionUtils

castStringCollection(Collection<T>,Class)

0

Using Streams and Lambda:

newIntegerlist = listName.stream().map(x-> 
    Integer.valueOf(x)).collect(Collectors.toList());

The above line of code will convert the List of type List<String> to List<Integer>.

I hope it was helpful.

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