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I have 3 vectors in 3D space. Let's call them xaxis, yaxis, and zaxis. These vectors are centered about an arbitrary point somewhere in 3D space. I am interested in rotating the xaxis and yaxis vectors about the zaxis vector a number of degrees θ.

For the following code with values being arbitrary and unimportant:

double xaxis[3], yaxis[3], zaxis[3], point[3], theta;

How would I go about rotating xaxis and yaxis about the zaxis by theta degrees?

Future Note: These attempts do not work. See my answer for the proper solution, which was found with the help of BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft

My attempt at matrix-based rotation:

double rx[3][3];
double ry[3][3];
double rz[3][3];
double r[3][3];

rx[0][0] = 1;
rx[0][1] = 0;
rx[0][2] = 0;

rx[1][0] = 0;
rx[1][1] = cos(theta);
rx[1][2] = sin(theta);

rx[2][0] = 0;
rx[2][1] = -1.0 * sin(theta);
rx[2][2] = cos(theta);

ry[0][0] = cos(theta);
ry[0][1] = 0;
ry[0][2] = -1.0 * sin(theta);

ry[1][0] = 0;
ry[1][1] = 1;
ry[1][2] = 0;

ry[2][0] = sin(theta);
ry[2][1] = 0;
ry[2][2] = cos(theta);
//No rotation wanted on the zaxis
rz[0][0] = cos(0);
rz[0][1] = sin(0);
rz[0][2] = 0;

rz[1][0] = -1.0 * sin(0);
rz[1][1] = cos(0);
rz[1][2] = 0;

rz[2][0] = 0;
rz[2][1] = 0;
rz[2][2] = 1;

vtkMath::Multiply3x3(rx, ry, r); //Multiplies rx by ry and stores into r
vtkMath::Multiply3x3(r, rz, r); //Multiplies r by rz and stores into r

vtkMath::Multiply3x3(r, xaxis, xaxis);//multiplies a 3x3 by a 3x1
vtkMath::Multiply3x3(r, yaxis, yaxis);//multiplies a 3x3 by a 3x1

This attempt only worked when the plane was in the x-y plane:

double x, y;
x = xaxis[0];
y = xaxis[1];
xaxis[0] = x * cos(theta) - y * sin(theta);
xaxis[1] = x * sin(theta) + y * cos(theta);

x = yaxis[0];
y = yaxis[1];
yaxis[0] = x * cos(theta) - y * sin(theta);
yaxis[1] = x * sin(theta) + y * cos(theta);

Using the axis-angle approach given by BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft:

double c = cos(theta);
double s = sin(theta);
double C = 1.0 - c;

double Q[3][3];
Q[0][0] = xaxis[0] * xaxis[0] * C + c;
Q[0][1] = xaxis[1] * xaxis[0] * C + xaxis[2] * s;
Q[0][2] = xaxis[2] * xaxis[0] * C - xaxis[1] * s;

Q[1][0] = xaxis[1] * xaxis[0] * C - xaxis[2] * s;
Q[1][1] = xaxis[1] * xaxis[1] * C + c;
Q[1][2] = xaxis[2] * xaxis[1] * C + xaxis[0] * s;

Q[2][0] = xaxis[1] * xaxis[2] * C + xaxis[1] * s;
Q[2][1] = xaxis[2] * xaxis[1] * C - xaxis[0] * s;
Q[2][2] = xaxis[2] * xaxis[2] * C + c;

double x = Q[2][1] - Q[1][2], y = Q[0][2] - Q[2][0], z = Q[1][0] - Q[0][1];
double r = sqrt(x * x + y * y + z * z);

//xaxis[0] /= r;
//xaxis[1] /= r;
//xaxis[2] /= r;

xaxis[0] = x;// ?
xaxis[1] = y;
xaxis[2] = z;
  • 1
    If you're programming in 3D, use a library and matrices. If not, this belongs on math.stackexchange.com. – chris May 22 '12 at 21:08
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    My advice would be to find the rotation algorithm first. This, for instance, might be of help. – Eitan T May 22 '12 at 21:18
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    i don't understand. the x, y and z axes are the things you measure your 3 coordinates against. you seem to be calling arbitrary vectors "xaxis" etc. why? your whole problem description sounds like you are trying to sound "correct" without actually thinking about what you are doing and what things mean. if you could clarify what you actually want then i suspect the solution would be pretty easy, but at the moment it's just a confused mess. – andrew cooke May 22 '12 at 21:33
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    @Drise: So ultimately your problem is that you want to rotate a vector about another vector by a certain angle. This is called the axis-angle representation of the rotation, and there is a simple way to convert it to a matrix-rotation using a skew-symmetric matrix. For some reason they don't mention it in the skew-symmetric matrix article on wikipedia, but they do have it under the rotation matrix article. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 22 '12 at 21:36
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    @Drise: You should use a struct instead of an array, so you can write xaxis.x rather than xaxis[0]. Also, I think you meant to use zaxis everywhere you wrote xaxis. The setup for Q looks correct (though usually when dealing with matricies, we put the row number first, then the column number, not the other way around), but everything below that is not needed - the bottom-half of that section on wikipedia is describing how to go from rotation matrix --> axis-angle, which is irrelevant to you. What you're missing is multiplying the rotation matrix by the vector you want to rotate. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 22 '12 at 22:18
2

Thanks to BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft:

double c = cos(theta);
double s = sin(theta);
double C = 1.0 - c;

double Q[3][3];
Q[0][0] = zaxis[0] * zaxis[0] * C + c;
Q[0][1] = zaxis[1] * zaxis[0] * C + zaxis[2] * s;
Q[0][2] = zaxis[2] * zaxis[0] * C - zaxis[1] * s;

Q[1][0] = zaxis[1] * zaxis[0] * C - zaxis[2] * s;
Q[1][1] = zaxis[1] * zaxis[1] * C + c;
Q[1][2] = zaxis[2] * zaxis[1] * C + zaxis[0] * s;

Q[2][0] = zaxis[0] * zaxis[2] * C + zaxis[1] * s;
Q[2][1] = zaxis[2] * zaxis[1] * C - zaxis[0] * s;
Q[2][2] = zaxis[2] * zaxis[2] * C + c;

xaxis[0] = xaxis[0] * Q[0][0] + xaxis[0] * Q[0][1] + xaxis[0] * Q[0][2];
xaxis[1] = xaxis[1] * Q[1][0] + xaxis[1] * Q[1][1] + xaxis[1] * Q[1][2];
xaxis[2] = xaxis[2] * Q[2][0] + xaxis[2] * Q[2][1] + xaxis[2] * Q[2][2]; // Multiply a 3x3 by 3x1 and store it as the new rotated axis

yaxis[0] = yaxis[0] * Q[0][0] + yaxis[0] * Q[0][1] + yaxis[0] * Q[0][2];
yaxis[1] = yaxis[1] * Q[1][0] + yaxis[1] * Q[1][1] + yaxis[1] * Q[1][2];
yaxis[2] = yaxis[2] * Q[2][0] + yaxis[2] * Q[2][1] + yaxis[2] * Q[2][2]; // Multiply a 3x3 by 3x1 and store it as the new rotated axis
0

I see that following matrix multiplication is wrong!

As stated above it can be factored with xaxis[0]

xaxis[0] = xaxis[0] * Q[0][0] + xaxis[0] * Q[0][1] + xaxis[0] * Q[0][2];

xaxis[0] = xaxis[0] * (Q[0][0] + Q[0][1] + Q[0][2]);

This does not look like a matrix multiplication. It should be:

xaxis1[0] = xaxis[0] * Q[0][0] + xaxis[1] * Q[0][1] + xaxis[2] * Q[0][2];
xaxis1[1] = xaxis[0] * Q[1][0] + xaxis[1] * Q[1][1] + xaxis[2] * Q[1][2];
xaxis1[2] = xaxis[0] * Q[2][0] + xaxis[1] * Q[2][1] + xaxis[2] * Q[2][2]; // Multiply a 3x3 by 3x1 and store it as the new rotated axis

yaxis1[0] = yaxis[0] * Q[0][0] + yaxis[1] * Q[0][1] + yaxis[2] * Q[0][2];
yaxis1[1] = yaxis[0] * Q[1][0] + yaxis[1] * Q[1][1] + yaxis[2] * Q[1][2];
yaxis1[2] = yaxis[0] * Q[2][0] + yaxis[1] * Q[2][1] + yaxis[2] * Q[2][2]; // Multiply a 3x3 by 3x1 and store it as the new rotated axis
  • I'm not sure what the issue is here. It's been quite some time since I've used this code, but it did in fact work when I last used it. – Drise Oct 25 '17 at 20:03

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