78

For example, if I had "scissors" in variable and wanted to know the position of all occurrences of the letter "s", it should print out 1, 4, 5, 8.

How can I do this in JavaScript in most efficient way? I don't think looping through the whole is terribly efficient

4
  • 12
    You really don't want 1-based character indices, do you?
    – Phrogz
    May 22, 2012 at 21:27
  • 3
    Unless you have a large string, or a large number of strings, or this happens fairly often (like 100's of times a second), looping through the whole string will probably suffice. What matters is not how efficient it is, but whether it is fast enough.
    – mellamokb
    May 22, 2012 at 21:27
  • 2
    Notice that the position of the characters start at 0 (not at 1), this is confusing at the beginning but you will do it automatically with practice
    – ajax333221
    May 22, 2012 at 22:36
  • 1
    "I don't think looping through the whole is terribly efficient" - How could it be possible to test every character in a string without looping through the whole string? Even if there was a built in .indexOfAll() method it would have to loop behind the scenes...
    – nnnnnn
    Aug 9, 2016 at 21:58

14 Answers 14

115

A simple loop works well:

var str = "scissors";
var indices = [];
for(var i=0; i<str.length;i++) {
    if (str[i] === "s") indices.push(i);
}

Now, you indicate that you want 1,4,5,8. This will give you 0, 3, 4, 7 since indexes are zero-based. So you could add one:

if (str[i] === "s") indices.push(i+1);

and now it will give you your expected result.

A fiddle can be see here.

I don't think looping through the whole is terribly efficient

As far as performance goes, I don't think this is something that you need to be gravely worried about until you start hitting problems.

Here is a jsPerf test comparing various answers. In Safari 5.1, the IndexOf performs the best. In Chrome 19, the for loop is the fastest.

enter image description here

17
  • 2
    +1 By far the fastest solution. jsperf.com/javascript-string-character-finder
    – Tomalak
    May 22, 2012 at 21:43
  • 3
    LOL, we three all made our own JSPerf tests ;) Note that looping is faster on Chrome, but slower on Firefox and IE (according to my test).
    – Phrogz
    May 22, 2012 at 21:51
  • 1
    @Phrogz Ah, sorry. I meant "In Safari, indexOf is the fastest. Add it to your list of browsers where indexOf is the fastest"
    – vcsjones
    May 22, 2012 at 21:57
  • 3
    @Phrogz and vcsjones: you guys used str[i] like if it where 100% crossbrowser compatibility... charAt() much more reliable
    – ajax333221
    May 22, 2012 at 22:15
  • 1
    This is how you should really test it, isolating the exact thing you are measuring: jsperf.com/10710345/3
    – vsync
    Jan 16, 2014 at 13:26
31

Using the native String.prototype.indexOf method to most efficiently find each offset.

function locations(substring,string){
  var a=[],i=-1;
  while((i=string.indexOf(substring,i+1)) >= 0) a.push(i);
  return a;
}

console.log(locations("s","scissors"));
//-> [0, 3, 4, 7]

This is a micro-optimization, however. For a simple and terse loop that will be fast enough:

// Produces the indices in reverse order; throw on a .reverse() if you want
for (var a=[],i=str.length;i--;) if (str[i]=="s") a.push(i);    

In fact, a native loop is faster on chrome that using indexOf!

Graph of performance results from the link

5
  • As @vcsjones mentioned, you can .push(i+1) if you (insanely) want 1-based values.
    – Phrogz
    May 22, 2012 at 21:27
  • 1
    +1, but suggesting to use reverse after pushing stuff? use unshift()
    – ajax333221
    May 22, 2012 at 21:42
  • @ajax333221 Thanks for that; I haven't tested the speed of unshift(), but it might be slower for large arrays than a .push() and .reverse().
    – Phrogz
    May 22, 2012 at 21:53
  • @p true, push + reverse seems to perform better in these tests
    – ajax333221
    May 22, 2012 at 22:18
  • AWESOME. Thank you
    – R Claven
    Jun 29, 2017 at 17:54
13

benchmark

When i benchmarked everything it seemed like regular expressions performed the best, so i came up with this

function indexesOf(string, regex) {
    var match,
        indexes = {};

    regex = new RegExp(regex);

    while (match = regex.exec(string)) {
        if (!indexes[match[0]]) indexes[match[0]] = [];
        indexes[match[0]].push(match.index);
    }

    return indexes;
}

you can do this

indexesOf('ssssss', /s/g);

which would return

{s: [0,1,2,3,4,5]}

i needed a very fast way to match multiple characters against large amounts of text so for example you could do this

indexesOf('dddddssssss', /s|d/g);

and you would get this

{d:[0,1,2,3,4], s:[5,6,7,8,9,10]}

this way you can get all the indexes of your matches in one go

3
  • According to the benchmark I ran on chrome, vcsjones is still the fastest jsperf.com/javascript-string-character-finder/6 Nov 21, 2015 at 11:01
  • Yes on a very small string, but look what happens when you increase the haystack: jsperf.com/javascript-string-character-finder/7 . Theres no competition, In my scenario i needed something that was performant in matching against large sets of text not a tiny string.
    – Chad Scira
    Nov 22, 2015 at 0:01
  • 1
    Ah ok fair point :), perhaps you should add that graph to your answer to make it clear why your solution is in fact the most efficient. Nov 22, 2015 at 16:04
12
function charPos(str, char) {
  return str
         .split("")
         .map(function (c, i) { if (c == char) return i; })
         .filter(function (v) { return v >= 0; });
}

charPos("scissors", "s");  // [0, 3, 4, 7]

Note that JavaScript counts from 0. Add +1 to i, if you must.

2
  • 4
    +1 for functional fun, even if it's wicked inefficient in contrast to what the OP was asking for.
    – Phrogz
    May 22, 2012 at 21:28
  • @jezternz Probably not the fastest one, though. -- Actually, it's very slow. jsperf.com/javascript-string-character-finder
    – Tomalak
    May 22, 2012 at 21:42
7

More functional fun, and also more general: This finds the starting indexes of a substring of any length in a string

const length = (x) => x.length
const sum = (a, b) => a+b

const indexesOf = (substr) => ({
  in: (str) => (
    str
    .split(substr)
    .slice(0, -1)
    .map(length)
    .map((_, i, lengths) => (
      lengths
      .slice(0, i+1)
      .reduce(sum, i*substr.length)
    ))
  )  
});

console.log(indexesOf('s').in('scissors')); // [0,3,4,7]

console.log(indexesOf('and').in('a and b and c')); // [2,8]

0
7

In modern browsers matchAll do the job :

const string = "scissors";
const matches = [...string.matchAll(/s/g)];

You can get the values in several ways. For example :

const indexes = matches.map(match => match.index);
5
indices = (c, s) => s
          .split('')
          .reduce((a, e, i) => e === c ? a.concat(i) : a, []);

indices('?', 'a?g??'); // [1, 3, 4]
0
2

Here is a short solution using a function expression (with ES6 arrow functions). The function accepts a string and the character to find as parameters. It splits the string into an array of characters and uses a reduce function to accumulate and return the matching indices as an array.

const findIndices = (str, char) =>
  str.split('').reduce((indices, letter, index) => {
    letter === char && indices.push(index);
    return indices;
  }, [])

Testing:

findIndices("Hello There!", "e");
// → [1, 8, 10]

findIndices("Looking for new letters!", "o");
// → [1, 2, 9]

Here is a compact (one-line) version:

const findIndices = (str, char) => str.split('').reduce( (indices, letter, index) => { letter === char && indices.push(index); return indices }, [] );
1

using while loop

let indices = [];
let array = "scissors".split('');
let element = 's';
    
let idx = array.indexOf(element);
    
while (idx !== -1) {
   indices.push(idx+1);
   idx = array.indexOf(element, idx + 1);
}
console.log(indices);

1

Another alternative could be using flatMap.

var getIndices = (s, t) => {
  return [...s].flatMap((char, i) => (char === t ? i + 1 : []));
};

console.log(getIndices('scissors', 's'));
console.log(getIndices('kaios', '0'));

0
0

I loved the question and thought to write my answer by using the reduce() method defined on arrays.

function getIndices(text, delimiter='.') {
    let indices = [];
    let combined;

    text.split(delimiter)
        .slice(0, -1)
        .reduce((a, b) => { 
            if(a == '') {
                combined = a + b;
            } else { 
                combined = a + delimiter + b;
            } 

            indices.push(combined.length);
            return combined; // Uncommenting this will lead to syntactical errors
        }, '');

    return indices;
}


let indices = getIndices(`Ab+Cd+Pk+Djb+Nice+One`, '+');
let indices2 = getIndices(`Program.can.be.done.in.2.ways`); // Here default delimiter will be taken as `.`

console.log(indices);  // [ 2, 5, 8, 12, 17 ]
console.log(indices2); // [ 7, 11, 14, 19, 22, 24 ]

// To get output as expected (comma separated)
console.log(`${indices}`);  // 2,5,8,12,17
console.log(`${indices2}`); // 7,11,14,19,22,24
0

Just for further solution, here is my solution: you can find character's indexes which exist in a string:

findIndex(str, char) {
    const strLength = str.length;
    const indexes = [];
    let newStr = str;

    while (newStr && newStr.indexOf(char) > -1) {
      indexes.push(newStr.indexOf(char) + strLength- newStr.length);
      newStr = newStr.substring(newStr.indexOf(char) + 1);
    }

    return indexes;
  }

findIndex('scissors', 's'); // [0, 3, 4, 7]
findIndex('Find "s" in this sentence', 's'); // [6, 15, 17]

1
  • While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply.
    – Brian
    Apr 12, 2020 at 19:05
0
function countClaps(str) {
     const re = new RegExp(/C/g);

    // matching the pattern
    const count = str.match(re).length;

    return count;
}
//countClaps();

console.log(countClaps("CCClaClClap!Clap!ClClClap!"));
3
  • 1
    Please don't post only code as answer, but also provide an explanation what your code does and how it solves the problem of the question. Answers with an explanation are usually more helpful and of better quality, and are more likely to attract upvotes. May 4 at 10:21
  • 1
    The question is not about counting anything. May 4 at 13:23
  • If you have a new question, please ask it by clicking the Ask Question button. Include a link to this question if it helps provide context. - From Review
    – cachius
    May 8 at 15:06
-2

You could probably use the match() function of javascript as well. You can create a regular expression and then pass it as a parameter to the match().

stringName.match(/s/g);

This should return you an array of all the occurrence of the the letter 's'.

2
  • 4
    this will not give indexes.
    – vivex
    Feb 28, 2019 at 10:56
  • @vivex it will give indexed. The match function returns with additional properties in which you can see the index of the result on which it was matches. Jan 7, 2021 at 9:49

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