8

In the following code, the functions foo1,foo2 and foo3 are intended to be equivalent. However when run foo3 does not terminate from the loop, is there a reason why this is the case?

template <typename T>
T foo1()
{
   T x = T(1);
   T y = T(0);
   for (;;)
   {
      if (x == y) break;
      y = x;
      ++x;
   }
   return x;
}

template <typename T>
T foo2()
{
   T x = T(0);
   for (;;)
   {
      T y = x + T(1);
      if (!(x != y)) break;
      ++x;
   }
   return x;
}

template <typename T>
T foo3()
{
   T x = T(0);
   while (x != (x + T(1))) ++x;
   return x;
}

int main()
{
   printf("1 float:  %20.5f\n", foo1<float>());
   printf("2 float:  %20.5f\n", foo2<float>());
   printf("3 float:  %20.5f\n", foo3<float>());
   return 0;
}

Note: This was compiled using VS2010 with /fp precise in release mode. Not sure how GCC etc would treat this code, any information would be great. Could this be an issue where in foo3, the x and x+1 values become NaN somehow?

14
  • 3
    Interesting issue. All three functions terminate as expected on gcc 4.2.1. I'm tempted to call it a bug in VS. May 23, 2012 at 5:52
  • 3
    Hmm. Smells like an overeager optimization (i.e., a compiler bug) to me. May 23, 2012 at 6:01
  • 2
    @MarkDickinson: Hangs for me under a debug build in VS2010
    – Ed S.
    May 23, 2012 at 6:09
  • 2
    If you compare the disassembly of the hanging version to the semantically equivalent T y = x + T(1); while(x != y) ++x; (which works) they look identical (at least, the important bits like the load and compare). May take a more experienced eye to figure out, but I'm still looking into it...
    – Ed S.
    May 23, 2012 at 6:20
  • 4
    BTW, the relevant passage from C99 (presumably there's something similar for C++) is in section 6.3.1.8, paragraph 2: "The values of floating operands and of the results of floating expressions may be represented in greater precision and range than that required by the type; the types are not changed thereby." So while the behaviour is surprising and annoying, it's not a compiler bug. May 23, 2012 at 7:19

1 Answer 1

13

What happens is most likely the following. On the x86 arch, intermediate calculations can be done with 80 bits of precision (long double is the corresponding C/C++ type). The compiler uses all 80 bits for the (+1) operation and for the (!=) operation, but truncates the results before storage.

So what your compiler really does is this:

while ((long double)(x) != ((long double)(x) + (long double)(1))) {
  x = (float)((long double)(x) + (long double)(1));
} 

This is absolutely non-IEEE-conforming and causes endless headaches for everyone, but this is the default for MSVC. Use /fp:strict compiler flag to disable this behaviour.

This is my recollection of the problem from about 10 years ago so please forgive me if this is somehow not entirely correct. See this for the official Microsoft documentation.

EDIT I was very surprised to learn that g++ by default exhibits exactly the same behaviour (on i386 linux, but not with e.g. -mfpmath=sse).

4
  • 4
    +1. Just using double rather than long double would be enough to cause problems here, but IIRC MS still likes to use the x87 FPU even for 64-bit builds, so long double seems more likely. May 23, 2012 at 6:43
  • 1
    Great knowledgeable answer but I notice that on VS2008 even with /fp:strict foo3() still doesn't terminate?
    – acraig5075
    May 23, 2012 at 6:56
  • 2
    @acraig5075: Agreed; I don't see how /fp:strict could help here. For /fp:precise, Microsoft's docs even specify that "Expression evaluation will follow the C99 FLT_EVAL_METHOD=2", confirming that intermediate values are computed to long double type. For /fp:strict, the documentation doesn't say, but I don't see any reason to assume a FLT_EVAL_METHOD=0 - like behaviour there. May 23, 2012 at 7:25
  • @acraig5075: strangely, g++ does it too on x86/x87 32-bit arch. So this is probably a common x87 behaviour. May 23, 2012 at 8:35

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