I'm setting up a new app using AngularJS as the frontend. Everything on the client side is done with HTML5 pushstate and I'd like to be able to track my page views in Google Analytics.

20 Answers 20

up vote 236 down vote accepted

If you're using ng-view in your Angular app you can listen for the $viewContentLoaded event and push a tracking event to Google Analytics.

Assuming you've set up your tracking code in your main index.html file with a name of var _gaq and MyCtrl is what you've defined in the ng-controller directive.

function MyCtrl($scope, $location, $window) {
  $scope.$on('$viewContentLoaded', function(event) {
    $window._gaq.push(['_trackPageView', $location.url()]);
  });
}

UPDATE: for new version of google-analytics use this one

function MyCtrl($scope, $location, $window) {
  $scope.$on('$viewContentLoaded', function(event) {
    $window.ga('send', 'pageview', { page: $location.url() });
  });
}
  • 12
    FWIW it should be _trackPageview and not _trackPageView ... spent 10 mins of head scratching :) – sajal Aug 16 '12 at 17:25
  • 118
    I would use $rootScope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess', ...) – bearfriend Jan 12 '13 at 14:31
  • 4
    @DavidRivers Hm, it's been a while, but just from glancing at this answer and my comment, it would seem that applying it to $rootScope would guarantee that it will not be removed by some other event or DOM change, and using routeChangeSuccess will fire every time the location bar changes, instead of just ever time you change your view source template. Does that make sense? – bearfriend Oct 17 '13 at 17:00
  • 5
    @dg988 during a $routeChangeSuccess event, you may NOT know upfront the page's title (which, for example, could be set inside a controller after it finished processing data from a RESTful service). This way alone with the URL of the page Google Analytics will track a title of the previous page. – Konstantin Tarkus Dec 3 '13 at 9:01
  • 41
    If you're using the GA new script, it's $window.ga('send', 'pageview', { page: $location.path() }); instead of the $window._gaq... part. Also, you may want to remove ga('send', 'pageview'); from your original GA code to prevent duplicates when you first land on a page. – CWSpear Dec 13 '13 at 5:25

When a new view is loaded in AngularJS, Google Analytics does not count it as a new page load. Fortunately there is a way to manually tell GA to log a url as a new pageview.

_gaq.push(['_trackPageview', '<url>']); would do the job, but how to bind that with AngularJS?

Here is a service which you could use:

(function(angular) { 

  angular.module('analytics', ['ng']).service('analytics', [
    '$rootScope', '$window', '$location', function($rootScope, $window, $location) {
      var track = function() {
        $window._gaq.push(['_trackPageview', $location.path()]);
      };
      $rootScope.$on('$viewContentLoaded', track);
    }
  ]);

}(window.angular));

When you define your angular module, include the analytics module like so:

angular.module('myappname', ['analytics']);

UPDATE:

You should use the new Universal Google Analytics tracking code with:

$window.ga('send', 'pageview', {page: $location.url()});
  • 6
    The other thing to note here is you need to include the "analytics" service somewhere. I did mine in app.run. – Nix Sep 5 '13 at 17:22
  • Would this need including in every module, or just the initial app? – designermonkey Nov 6 '14 at 11:08
  • 1
    @Designermonkey It should work if you include just in your main app module. If you have a totally independent module though which does not require your main module, you may need to include that again. Cheers! – Haralan Dobrev Nov 6 '14 at 12:04
  • If you're using a service, you should define your functions with the "this" keyword: source. For example, within the service it would be this.track = function($window.ga('send', 'pageview', {page: $location.url()}); This will allow you to use googleAnalytics.track(); within your app.run() function – zcoon May 25 '16 at 15:19
app.run(function ($rootScope, $location) {
    $rootScope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess', function(){
        ga('send', 'pageview', $location.path());
    });
});
  • 8
    Note: If you use minimzation/compilation you need to specify the parameter names: app.run(["$rootScope", "$location", function(... – dplass Jul 1 '14 at 15:15
  • This solution is excellent if you don't want to include GA code in every controller. – breez Dec 14 '14 at 11:56
  • 1
    Not so great if you have async code that dynamically changes your title, else its great. – Johan Sep 30 '15 at 9:49

Just a quick addition. If you're using the new analytics.js, then:

var track = function() {     
 ga('send', 'pageview', {'page': $location.path()});                
};

Additionally one tip is that google analytics will not fire on localhost. So if you are testing on localhost, use the following instead of the default create (full documentation)

ga('create', 'UA-XXXX-Y', {'cookieDomain': 'none'});
  • Oh man, thanks. I was getting weird errors, and noticed my snippet didn't even have _gaq in it, hehe. Silly Google: updating their code and all that! Haha. – CWSpear Dec 13 '13 at 5:19
  • 3
    Make sure you use $window to access the window (ga alone inside Angular is very likely to be undefined). Also, you may want to remove ga('send', 'pageview'); from your original GA code to prevent duplicates when you first land on a page. – CWSpear Dec 13 '13 at 5:22
  • 6
    Using ui-router you can send page views like this: $rootScope.$on('$stateChangeSuccess', function (event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams) { ga('send', 'pageview', { 'page': $location.path(), 'title': toState.name }); }); – pherris May 1 '14 at 9:46
  • 2
    To add: If you are using search parameters in your app you can track those using $location.url() – Ade Jun 13 '14 at 7:43
  • 2
    I upvoted this answer since using .path() is better than .url() because you normally want to exclude query string params. See: Google Analytics Configuration Mistake #2: Query String Variables – frodo2975 Feb 6 '15 at 15:36

I've created a service + filter that could help you guys with this, and maybe also with some other providers if you choose to add them in the future.

Check out https://github.com/mgonto/angularytics and let me know how this works out for you.

Merging the answers by wynnwu and dpineda was what worked for me.

angular.module('app', [])
  .run(['$rootScope', '$location', '$window',
    function($rootScope, $location, $window) {
      $rootScope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess',
        function(event) {
          if (!$window.ga) {
            return;
          }
          $window.ga('send', 'pageview', {
            page: $location.path()
          });
        });
    }
  ]);

Setting the third parameter as an object (instead of just $location.path()) and using $routeChangeSuccess instead of $stateChangeSuccess did the trick.

Hope this helps.

I've created a simple example on github using the above approach.

https://github.com/isamuelson/angularjs-googleanalytics

  • I added a fix to better report the path. so now if you have the route of /account/:accountId aka path is http://somesite.com/account/123 it now will report the path as /account?accountId=123 – IBootstrap Jan 4 '13 at 20:21
  • @IBootstrap what is the benefit of putting the route params in query string? – Pavel Nikolov Apr 23 '13 at 9:57
  • @IBootstrap I have the same question, what is the benefit of putting the route params in query string ? – nXqd Jun 6 '13 at 7:14
  • 1
    Not all routes are different pages and GA treat each route as different page. By converting the route to query string, you have the option to ignore parts of the query string. – IBootstrap Aug 21 '13 at 5:26

If someone wants to implement using directives then, identify (or create) a div in the index.html (just under the body tag, or at same DOM level)

<div class="google-analytics"/>

and then add the following code in the directive

myApp.directive('googleAnalytics', function ( $location, $window ) {
  return {
    scope: true,
    link: function (scope) {
      scope.$on( '$routeChangeSuccess', function () {
        $window._gaq.push(['_trackPageview', $location.path()]);
      });
    }
  };
});

The best way to do this is using Google Tag Manager to fire your Google Analytics tags based on history listeners. These are built in to the GTM interface and easily allow tracking on client side HTML5 interactions .

Enable the built in History variables and create a trigger to fire an event based on history changes.

In your index.html, copy and paste the ga snippet but remove the line ga('send', 'pageview');

<!-- Google Analytics: change UA-XXXXX-X to be your site's ID -->
<script>
  (function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){
  (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o),
  m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m)
  })(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga');
  ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXXXX-X');
</script>

I like to give it it's own factory file my-google-analytics.js with self injection:

angular.module('myApp')
  .factory('myGoogleAnalytics', [
    '$rootScope', '$window', '$location', 
    function ($rootScope, $window, $location) {

      var myGoogleAnalytics = {};

      /**
       * Set the page to the current location path
       * and then send a pageview to log path change.
       */
      myGoogleAnalytics.sendPageview = function() {
        if ($window.ga) {
          $window.ga('set', 'page', $location.path());
          $window.ga('send', 'pageview');
        }
      }

      // subscribe to events
      $rootScope.$on('$viewContentLoaded', myGoogleAnalytics.sendPageview);

      return myGoogleAnalytics;
    }
  ])
  .run([
    'myGoogleAnalytics', 
    function(myGoogleAnalytics) {
        // inject self
    }
  ]);
  • I like that selfinjection stuff :) Up – Sam Vloeberghs Sep 18 '15 at 6:40
  • Just out of curiosity, why do you set the page with the current path, and then submit it as a pageview? What is the difference of doing it that way instead of just $window.ga('send', 'pageview', {page: $location.url()});? – Fizzix Feb 29 '16 at 6:42
  • 1
    I can't remember TBH but by looking at it I would say it leaves flexibility for other actions or logging additional stuff elsewhere, and may be more accurate by explicitly telling ga of the current page, so ga can continue to functiona accurately, rather than JUST logging a pageview for some "arbitrary" page url. – ilovett Feb 29 '16 at 22:16
  • If you want realtime analytics to work in Google you should do "set". For why see documentation reference: developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/… – fuzzysearch Apr 1 '16 at 14:54

If you're using ui-router you can subscribe to the $stateChangeSuccess event like this:

$rootScope.$on('$stateChangeSuccess', function (event) {
    $window.ga('send', 'pageview', $location.path());
});

For a complete working example see this blog post

Use GA 'set' to ensure routes are picked up for Google realtime analytics. Otherwise subsequent calls to GA will not show in the realtime panel.

$scope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess', function() {
    $window.ga('set', 'page', $location.url());
    $window.ga('send', 'pageview');
});

Google strongly advises this approach generally instead of passing a 3rd param in 'send'. https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/analyticsjs/single-page-applications

I am using AngluarJS in html5 mode. I found following solution as most reliable:

Use angular-google-analytics library. Initialize it with something like:

//Do this in module that is always initialized on your webapp    
angular.module('core').config(["AnalyticsProvider",
  function (AnalyticsProvider) {
    AnalyticsProvider.setAccount(YOUR_GOOGLE_ANALYTICS_TRACKING_CODE);

    //Ignoring first page load because of HTML5 route mode to ensure that page view is called only when you explicitly call for pageview event
    AnalyticsProvider.ignoreFirstPageLoad(true);
  }
]);

After that, add listener on $stateChangeSuccess' and send trackPage event.

angular.module('core').run(['$rootScope', '$location', 'Analytics', 
    function($rootScope, $location, Analytics) {
        $rootScope.$on('$stateChangeSuccess', function(event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, options) {
            try {
                Analytics.trackPage($location.url());
            }
            catch(err) {
              //user browser is disabling tracking
            }
        });
    }
]);

At any moment, when you have your user initalized you can inject Analytics there and make call:

Analytics.set('&uid', user.id);

I am using ui-router and my code looks like this:

$rootScope.$on('$stateChangeSuccess', function(event, toState, toParams){
  /* Google analytics */
  var path = toState.url;
  for(var i in toParams){
    path = path.replace(':' + i, toParams[i]);
  }
  /* global ga */
  ga('send', 'pageview', path);
});

This way I can track different states. Maybe someone will find it usefull.

I found the gtag() function worked, instead of the ga() function.

In the index.html file, within the <head> section:

<script async src="https://www.googletagmanager.com/gtag/js?id=TrackingId"></script>
<script>
  window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || [];
  function gtag(){dataLayer.push(arguments);}
  gtag('js', new Date());
  gtag('config', 'TrackingId');
</script>

In the AngularJS code:

app.run(function ($rootScope, $location) {
  $rootScope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess', function() {
    gtag('config', 'TrackingId', {'page_path': $location.path()});
  });
});

Replace TrackingId with your own Tracking Id.

For those of you using AngularUI Router instead of ngRoute can use the following code to track page views.

app.run(function ($rootScope) {
    $rootScope.$on('$stateChangeSuccess', function (event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams) {
        ga('set', 'page', toState.url);
        ga('send', 'pageview');
    });
});

Developers creating Single Page Applications can use autotrack, which includes a urlChangeTracker plugin that handles all of the important considerations listed in this guide for you. See the autotrack documentation for usage and installation instructions.

Merging even more with Pedro Lopez's answer,

I added this to my ngGoogleAnalytis module(which I reuse in many apps):

var base = $('base').attr('href').replace(/\/$/, "");

in this case, I have a tag in my index link:

  <base href="/store/">

it's useful when using html5 mode on angular.js v1.3

(remove the replace() function call if your base tag doesn't finish with a slash /)

angular.module("ngGoogleAnalytics", []).run(['$rootScope', '$location', '$window',
    function($rootScope, $location, $window) {
      $rootScope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess',
        function(event) {
          if (!$window.ga) { return; }
          var base = $('base').attr('href').replace(/\/$/, "");

          $window.ga('send', 'pageview', {
            page: base + $location.path()
          });
        }
      );
    }
  ]);

I personally like to set up my analytics with the template URL instead of the current path. This is mainly because my application has many custom paths such as message/:id or profile/:id. If I were to send these paths, I'd have so many pages being viewed within analytics, it would be too difficult to check which page users are visiting most.

$rootScope.$on('$viewContentLoaded', function(event) {
    $window.ga('send', 'pageview', {
        page: $route.current.templateUrl.replace("views", "")
    });
});

I now get clean page views within my analytics such as user-profile.html and message.html instead of many pages being profile/1, profile/2 and profile/3. I can now process reports to see how many people are viewing user profiles.

If anyone has any objection to why this is bad practise within analytics, I would be more than happy to hear about it. Quite new to using Google Analytics, so not too sure if this is the best approach or not.

If you are looking for full control of Google Analytics's new tracking code, you could use my very own Angular-GA.

It makes ga available through injection, so it's easy to test. It doesn't do any magic, apart from setting the path on every routeChange. You still have to send the pageview like here.

app.run(function ($rootScope, $location, ga) {
    $rootScope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess', function(){
        ga('send', 'pageview');
    });
});

Additionaly there is a directive ga which allows to bind multiple analytics functions to events, like this:

<a href="#" ga="[['set', 'metric1', 10], ['send', 'event', 'player', 'play', video.id]]"></a>

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