5

I need help ,

I´m receiving an homography from a server, so I want to normalize this homography to my app´s coordinate system, when I try to represent an object in coordinates, the server app generates the next 4 points:

received [96.629539, 217.31934; 97.289948, 167.21941; 145.69249, 168.28044; 145.69638, 219.84604]

and my app generates the next 4 points:

local [126.0098, 55.600437; 262.39163, 53.98035; 259.41382, 195.34763; 121.48138, 184.95235]

I you represent this points in graphic, R(received), P(local)

enter image description here

It looks like the generated square is rotated and scaled, so I would want to know if there is any way to apply this rotation an scale to the the server homography in order to by able to have the same homography than my apps homography.

Thanks, I you need more information please ask me.


Thank you very much for the quick answers, at the end I use other approximation, as simple as get the points from the server and the use findhomography to get the inverse homography.

homography=findHomography(srcPoints, dstPoints, match_mask, RANSAC, 10);

thanks!!!

3
  • I don't understand what you want to do. – Thomash May 23 '12 at 14:05
  • Sounds like perspective transformation? are you mapping one quadrilateral to another? – PeskyGnat May 23 '12 at 14:24
  • I want to apply a modification to an homography, to convert this homography to my unit/coordinates system. – Gustavo May 23 '12 at 14:27
4

I think I figured this out. Below is a bit more accurate plot of your two homographies. Where blue is the 'received' homography and red is the 'local' homography.

enter image description here

You can use the OpenCV function getAffineTransform to compute the affine transform that relates 3 point pairs (I had to reorganize your point pairs because they were in the wrong order). I ran this in numpy as follows:

r = array([[97.289948, 167.21941], [96.629539, 217.31934], [145.69638, 219.84604]], np.float32)
l = array([[126.0098, 55.600437], [121.48138, 184.95235], [259.41382, 195.34763]], np.float32)
A = cv2.getAffineTransform(r, l)

This gives us the following affine relation:

array([[  2.81385763e+00,  -5.32961421e-02,  -1.38838108e+02],
       [  7.88519054e-02,   2.58291747e+00,  -3.83984986e+02]])

I applied this back to r to see if I could get l to make sure it works like this:

# split affine warp into rotation, scale, and/or shear + translation matrix
T = mat(A[:, 2]).T
matrix([[-138.83810801],
        [-383.98498637]])

A = mat(A[:, 0:2])
matrix([[ 2.81385763, -0.05329614],
        [ 0.07885191,  2.58291747]])

# apply warp to r to get l
r = mat(r).T
A*r + T
# gives
matrix([[ 126.00980377,  121.48137665,  259.41381836],
        [  55.60043716,  184.9523468 ,  195.34762573]])
# which equals
l = mat(l).T
matrix([[ 126.00980377,  121.48137665,  259.41381836],
        [  55.60043716,  184.9523468 ,  195.34762573]], dtype=float32)

Also of note, you can produce a perspective transform as is shown by Markus Jarderot by using the OpenCV function getPerspectiveTransform.

Hope that helps!

2

If you plug in the points and transformations into Maple, you can get the results pretty quickly.

> with(LinearAlgebra);

> # The server coordinates
  pa := [[96.629539, 217.31934], [97.289948, 167.21941], [145.69249, 168.28044],
         [145.69638, 219.84604]]:

> # The local coordiantes
  pb := [[126.0098, 55.600437], [262.39163, 53.98035], [259.41382, 195.34763],
         [121.48138, 184.95235]]:

> # The placeholder variables for the transformation (last one is '1', because it
  # is scale-invariant)
  T := [seq]([seq](`if`(i = 3 and j = 3, 1, t[i, j]), j = 1 .. 3), i = 1 .. 3):
  V := convert(map(op, T)[1 .. -2], set):

> # Transformation function (Matrix multiplication + divide with 3rd coordinate)
  trans := (p, T) -> [
      (T[1, 1]*p[1]+T[1, 2]*p[2]+T[1, 3])/(T[3, 1]*p[1]+T[3, 2]*p[2]+T[3, 3]),
      (T[2, 1]*p[1]+T[2, 2]*p[2]+T[2, 3])/(T[3, 1]*p[1]+T[3, 2]*p[2]+T[3, 3])
  ]:

> # Transform pa, and construct the equation system
  pat := map(trans, pa, T):
  eqs := {op}(zip((p1, p2) -> op(zip(`=`, p1, p2)), pat, pb)):

> # Solve for the transform variables
  sol := solve(eqs, V):

> # Populate the transform
  eval(T, sol);

Output:

[[  .1076044020,   -3.957029830,    1074.517140  ],
 [ 4.795375318,      .3064507355,   -430.7044862 ],
 [ 0.3875626264e-3, 0.3441632491e-2,   1         ]]

To use this, multiply it with the server-points as T * <x, y, 1>.


void ServerToLocal(double serverX, double serverY, double *localX, double *localY)
{
    double w;
    w = 0.3875626264e-3 * serverX + 0.3441632491e-2 * serverY + 1.0;
    *localX = (.1076044020 * serverX - 3.957029830 * serverY + 1074.517140) / w;
    *localY = (4.795375318 * serverX + .3064507355 * serverY - 430.7044862) / w;
}

Another method can be read at http://alumni.media.mit.edu/~cwren/interpolator/

This one could be written in C, given a reasonable linear algebra library.

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