6

I have a single class "Base", and a few tens of classes derived from Base. I would like to have a method that creates me the right class by an index. Like this:

class Base
{
};

class A : public Base
{
}

class B : public Base
{
}

class C : public Base
{
}

Type array = { A, B, C };

and then I could do new array[i];

How could this be achieved with C++(0x)? Usually I would use an the Abstract Factory Pattern. But since I have a LOT of derived classes, this would really slow down the program.

Since the derived classes will be used only once I also taught to use this:

Base *array = { new A, new B, new C };

But this would lead to huge memory consumption, not counting that not every class will always be used.

Any suggestion?

10
  • 3
    " since I have a LOT of derived classes, this would really slow down the program." Have you proved this? Because I highly doubt it. Commented May 23, 2012 at 15:17
  • What does this mean? Type array = { A, B, C };.
    – Pubby
    Commented May 23, 2012 at 15:18
  • @JohnDibling: have never been too famous for their speed. When I have a switch with too many cases, I prefer to use an array of functions... Commented May 23, 2012 at 15:20
  • @Pubby: it's obviously wrong. It was just an example of what I would like to do... An array of class types. Commented May 23, 2012 at 15:22
  • 1
    Wait, so you want new array[0] to create an A nad new array[1] to create a B?
    – Pubby
    Commented May 23, 2012 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

12

You cannot use an array of classes, but you can use an array of pointers to functions.

typedef std::unique_ptr<Base> (*Creator)();

template <typename T>
std::unique_ptr<Base> make() { return new T{}; }

Creator const array[] = { make<A>, make<B>, make<C> };

int main() {
    std::unique_ptr<Base> b = array[1]();

    b->foo();
}

For those worried by the cost of creating so many template functions, here is an example:

#include <stdio.h>

struct Base { virtual void foo() const = 0; };

struct A: Base { void foo() const { printf("A"); } };
struct B: Base { void foo() const { printf("B"); } };
struct C: Base { void foo() const { printf("C"); } };


typedef Base* (*Creator)();

template <typename T>
static Base* make() { return new T{}; }

static Creator const array[] = { make<A>, make<B>, make<C> };

Base* select_array(int i) {
    return array[i]();
}

Base* select_switch(int i) {
    switch(i) {
    case 0: return make<A>();
    case 1: return make<B>();
    case 2: return make<C>();
    default: return 0;
    }
}

LLVM/Clang generates the following output:

define %struct.Base* @select_array(int)(i32 %i) uwtable {
  %1 = sext i32 %i to i64
  %2 = getelementptr inbounds [3 x %struct.Base* ()*]* @array, i64 0, i64 %1
  %3 = load %struct.Base* ()** %2, align 8, !tbaa !0
  %4 = tail call %struct.Base* %3()
  ret %struct.Base* %4
}

define noalias %struct.Base* @select_switch(int)(i32 %i) uwtable {
  switch i32 %i, label %13 [
    i32 0, label %1
    i32 1, label %5
    i32 2, label %9
  ]

; <label>:1                                       ; preds = %0
  %2 = tail call noalias i8* @operator new(unsigned long)(i64 8)
  %3 = bitcast i8* %2 to i32 (...)***
  store i32 (...)** bitcast (i8** getelementptr inbounds ([3 x i8*]* @vtable for A, i64 0, i64 2) to i32 (...)**), i32 (...)*** %3, align 8
  %4 = bitcast i8* %2 to %struct.Base*
  br label %13

; <label>:5                                       ; preds = %0
  %6 = tail call noalias i8* @operator new(unsigned long)(i64 8)
  %7 = bitcast i8* %6 to i32 (...)***
  store i32 (...)** bitcast (i8** getelementptr inbounds ([3 x i8*]* @vtable for B, i64 0, i64 2) to i32 (...)**), i32 (...)*** %7, align 8
  %8 = bitcast i8* %6 to %struct.Base*
  br label %13

; <label>:9                                       ; preds = %0
  %10 = tail call noalias i8* @operator new(unsigned long)(i64 8)
  %11 = bitcast i8* %10 to i32 (...)***
  store i32 (...)** bitcast (i8** getelementptr inbounds ([3 x i8*]* @vtable for C, i64 0, i64 2) to i32 (...)**), i32 (...)*** %11, align 8
  %12 = bitcast i8* %10 to %struct.Base*
  br label %13

; <label>:13                                      ; preds = %9, %5, %1, %0
  %.0 = phi %struct.Base* [ %12, %9 ], [ %8, %5 ], [ %4, %1 ], [ null, %0 ]
  ret %struct.Base* %.0
}

Unfortunately, it is not quite intelligent enough to automatically inline the functions with a regular array code (known issue with the LLVM optimizer, I don't know if gcc does better)... but using switch it is indeed possible.

2
  • Well, this surely works, but it will instantiate a lot of functions make<A>, make<B>, etc... Isn't there any preprocessor trick that will work? :) Commented May 23, 2012 at 15:48
  • 1
    @AlfaOmega08: no preprocessor trick will work, sorry. As for generating different functions... yes it will, it is ineluctable since each class has its own constructor to call. I expanded the answer with a use of switch to help the compiler performing the necessary inlining; it should remove the code for the functions (no longer used) and the overhead of the function call. Commented May 23, 2012 at 16:04
5
typedef Base* BaseMaker();

template <class X> Base* make() {
  return new X;
}

BaseMaker* makers[] = { make<A>, make<B>, make<C> };

Base* b = makers[2]();
1
  • You are a genius guy!
    – Vassilis
    Commented Sep 28, 2018 at 21:48

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